Utah Men’s Basketball Legend Wat Misaka Passes Away

first_img Tags: BAA/NBA/New York Knickerbockers/Utah basketball/Wat Misaka Written by November 21, 2019 /Sports News – Local Utah Men’s Basketball Legend Wat Misaka Passes Away Brad James FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailSALT LAKE CITY-Per a statement released Thursday, University of Utah men’s basketball legend Wataru “Wat” Misaka passed away at the age of 95 Wednesday in Salt Lake City.Misaka helped lead the Utes to national championships in 1944 and 1947 and became the first non-Caucasian player to play in the Basketball Association of America (the predecessor to the NBA) in 1947.Misaka is renowned as “the Jackie Robinson of basketball” and is a 1999 inductee into the Utah Sports Hall of Fame.He was also enshrined in the University of Utah’s Crimson Club Hall of Fame in 2011.Misaka was the point guard for the Utes’ 1944 NCAA Tournament championship team (Utah edged Dartmouth 42-40) and the 1947 NIT championship team (the Utes downed Kentucky 49-45).In between his two seasons of playing for the Utes, he was drafted into the military, rising to the rank of Staff Sergeant.Following his playing career, Misaka was drafted by the New York Knickerbockers in the 1947 BAA Draft with the 43rd overall selection.As the first player of Japanese descent to play in this association, he competed in three games and scored seven points during the 1947-48 season.In August 2018, he was honored by his hometown of Ogden with the “Kilowatt Court” at Liberty Park.He was the subject of the 2008 documentary: “Transcending: The Wat Misaka Story.”last_img read more

The Negotiator Awards comes closer…

first_imgThe excitement is mounting and calendars in estate agencies, lettings agencies, auctioneers and property industry suppliers’ offices across the UK are marked with a big star on 1stNovember!The standard of entries this year has been even higher than last year’s and the judges’ task is correspondingly greater, but they are now ‘on the job’ reviewing the entries – which is no easy task with hundreds of entries, from across the UK and from every size of business. Every entrant has a story to tell, success to report, special achievements to report.Our panel of judges, named below, all highly respected industry experts, are now taking time to read the entries, visit websites, check important details and form a view of each entry, eventually deciding on those that really impress, before the final judging round. The Negotiator Awards Judges 2016Once again, we have a fine panel of judges, carefully selected to build the best possible range of experience, skills and integrity.Katrine Sporle: The Property OmbudsmanPeter Bolton King: Global Property Standards Director, RICSNicholas Leeming: Chairman, Jackson-Stops and StaffMark Goddard: Managing Director, Property Services, Zoopla Property GroupJulian O’Dell: TM Training and DevelopmentCaroline Coskry: Group Managing Director, Oracle GroupFrances Burkinshaw: Freelance TrainerKatie Griffin: President Elect, NAEA and Director, Sawdye & HarrisNik Madan: President: ARLA and Group Lettings Development Director, Connells GroupSimon King: Partner Network Director, MovewithusDavid Sandeman, Managing Director, Essential Information GroupJeremy Tapp: Joint Managing Director, HomeflowJeremy Leaf: Director, Jeremy Leaf & Co.Robert Scarff: Estate Agency ConsultantRoger Southam, CEO, Chainbow Don’t delay, book your tickets today:Individual Place: £225 + VATTable of ten: £2025 + VATTable of twelve: £2250 + VATCall our ticket hotline on: 0844 745 3104. Joint Conference and Awards – Special Earlybird ticket prices.Make it a day by attending The Negotiator Conference and Expo, same day, same venue, starts at 9am, closes at 4.30pm (time to change into your evening finery!)Standard delegate rate for the day is £130 + VAT. Special Earlybird rate until 30th September 2016 (and not a day after!) For one joint ticket for the Conference and Expo as well as attending the Awards Dinner: £249 + VAT for one place.For 10 tickets for the conference and Expo PLUS a table of 10 for the evening Awards is £2241 + VAT.Call our ticket hotline on: 0844 745 3104.  Every year at The Negotiator Awards, the bookings grow. It’s not just about the champagne reception or the glittering guests in black tie and posh frocks. It’s not just about the superb dinner that follows. It isn’t even all about the entertainment and the legendary Property Party of the Year. It is, of course, about winning one of the iconic Negotiator Awards.The Negotiator Awards Judges 2016 Awards The Negotiator Awards 2016 events August 17, 2016The NegotiatorWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Hong Kong remains most expensive city to rent with London in 4th place30th April 2021 Home » News » The Negotiator Awards comes closer… previous nextThe Negotiator Awards comes closer…17th August 201601,675 Viewslast_img read more

New College to host new Institute of Charity

first_imgNew College this week announced the foundation of the Oxford Institute of Charity (OIC). The culmination of almost three years of discussion and planning, the OIC is a collaborative initiative between the college and Charity Futures, a charity sector think tank. Mr Young told Cherwell that the Institute is “designed to fill a gaping hole”. “The participation of New College in this collaboration is very significant for us. Charity Futures was established to look at the long-term future health of the charitable sector in the UK,” he added. The Institute was established to “promote the importance of research and study of study, both at post-graduate and undergraduate level, in universities more generally”, “deliver high calibre academic research to be used by the global community”, and to “develop networks and foster international links”. Bubb said: “When there are so many divisions in society, civil society is needed more than ever. And when charities themselves face challenges, research and study of charity is particularly timely. The new direction in research is due to a serious lack of academic research into the subject. With most academic effort focused on “the study of giving”, the resulting model of charity remains “poorly explained, with implications for issues ranging from the governance of charity (often poor) to the perceptions of charity (generally weak).” By furthering academic research into relatively unexplored areas, the Institute aims to “promote better, more sustainable, and effective performance of charity in the world.” Despite its new base in Oxford, the Institute also aims to promote their project in universities throughout the country, as highlighted by Bubb: “although the Oxford Institute of Charity, based at New College will be a research centre we hope that we will also look at the potential for study and teaching, in conjunction with other universities.” The Institute is set to open its doors in the summer of 2022 in a purpose-built home on a newly developed part of the college site. Work at the OIC begins next month with the development of a strategic fundraising plan. Before its launch, the Institute aims to secure a £30 million endowment that will provide a sustainable annual income. “My role is to give the Institute a solid foundation from which it can thrive and prosper long into the future. In practical terms this means establishing a firm financial base and securing an inspirational academic leader.” The Warden of New College, Miles Young, said: “Charity’s important role in our society is often undervalued, and I believe that one cause of that is that it is surprisingly little studied in Universities […] New College was founded as a charitable enterprise by William of Wykeham as far back as 1379, so this does seem an appropriate place to help remedy the academic neglect of the subject.” Research conducted will take an interdisciplinary approach, drawing on a broad range of academic knowledge and skills. The research will look at issues such as the history of charity, the relationship between charity and politics, and the ethics of charitable governance. The Director of Charity Futures, Sir Stephen Bubb, will assume the interim role of Acting Director. He will be tasked with commissioning the fundraising strategy, raising awareness of OIC in academic circles and in charities, and working collaboratively with the college to identify and appoint the first Academic Director. Its additional objectives include the digitisation of charity records to further wider research, and the organisation of conferences and summer schools for leading academics, philanthropists, corporate donors, and leaders of civil society from around the world. last_img read more

Decorations on Asbury Avenue Mark Start of Holiday Season

first_imgDecorative swags cross Asbury Avenue between Sixth and Seventh streets as work crews continue a holiday decorating project between Sixth and 14th streets in Ocean City, NJ. Decorative swags cross Asbury Avenue between Sixth and Seventh streets as work crews continue a holiday decorating project between Sixth and 14th streets in Ocean City, NJ.A blustery and cool day provided the perfect backdrop on Monday for the start of the  holiday decoration installation in the downtown shopping district.An outside company — Downtown Decorations Inc. — began wrapping lampposts with garland and bows. Work will continue this week with the decorations of City Hall with wreaths and bows, the hanging of cross-street swags on Asbury Avenue from Sixth Street to 14th Street, and the additional decoration of the Ninth Street Gateway, Route 52 Welcome Center and Ocean City Music Pier.The wrapping of lampposts in garland and bows is a first step in downtown decorating that will include cross-street swags and lights from Sixth Street to 14th Street.The decorations mark the start of an important season for the downtown that will include:Earlier Than The Bird Downtown Shopping Extravaganza: Downtown merchants invite customers to shop in their pajamas 8 a.m. to noon Saturday, Nov. 22, to get a jump start on holiday shopping. The event includes prizes and shopping discounts.Christmas in the Downtown: The downtown’s “Miracle on Asbury Avenue” celebration takes place 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, Nov. 28. The old-fashioned downtown Christmas event culminates with Santa descending from the roof of City Hall to visit with children.Free Horse and Carriage Rides: Weekends through Christmas (including Friday, Nov. 28) noon to 3 p.m. with pickup at Ninth Street and Asbury Avenue.Breakfast With Santa: A schedule of visits at Ocean City breakfast spots will be available soon.City Council invested $129,000 in grant money in 2012 to purchase reusable decorations for the downtown, the Ninth Street, the new Welcome Center on the Route 52 causeway and the Ocean City Music Pier.In their first year, the decorations took on additional meaning as they came to represent a quick recovery from Superstorm Sandy for many businesses. But the decorations continue to be an important attraction for visiting shoppers. At the time of the purchase, the city estimated it would spend about $19,000 each year putting up, taking down, storing and maintaining the decorations.Temporary silver mounting poles for the cross-street swags were installed last week.The Downtown Merchants Association is encouraging businesses to decorate with white lights in the windows to follow the theme, according to co-chairman Paul Cunningham.last_img read more

ABF criticises gas market as energy prices increase

first_imgAssociated British Foods said the market for gas is not operating as intended, as it complained of rising energy prices at its Annual General Meeting on December 9. Chairman Martin Adamson said the market for gas had “simply failed to operate in the way intended”. He commented: “For example, last week, despite sharply higher prices, the main gas pipeline from Europe operated at substantially below capacity and stocks consequently reduced further. If supplies to the industry had failed, this would have had serious consequences for the industry and customers alike.”The company, which operates businesses including AB Mauri, British Sugar and Allied Bakeries, said overall trading in the early part of the current year has been a little ahead of the previous year. But competition in all ABF markets is strong and the current trend in energy prices is a particular concern, said Mr Adamson.ABF spent a total of £1.5 billion on renewing plant and machinery over the year, expanding capacity and buying new businesses. Some £733m was spent on acquiring new businesses, of which the major part was in the yeast and bakery ingredients business that is now trading as AB Mauri.Mr Adamson also referred to the proposed reform of the EU sugar regime as he made his presentation to sharehol-ders. An agreement, reached by the Council of Ministers on November 24 in Brussels, is welcomed by British Sugar, as it is one of the most efficient producers in the EU, he said. “We envisage a continuing successful role for British Sugar which will be supported with investment, where appropriate, as it adapts to the new environment,” he commented.The outcome is expected to be slightly better at the end of the period of transition than the £40m reduction in profit, which was estimated in June 2005 in response to the Commission’s first proposals, he said.Trading in the current year for British Sugar UK and Poland has been difficult, added Mr Adamson. “We expect volatility to continue during the transition to the new EU regime. We continue to work on cost reductions in both the UK and Poland and the exploitation of new revenue opportunities including the manufacture of bioethanol in the UK,” he concluded.last_img read more

Herzl re-imagined

first_imgDerek Penslar, William Lee Frost Professor of Jewish History at Harvard University, has long studied modern Jewish history from a global perspective. In his new biography of  Theodor Herzl, Penslar examined how the founder of modern Zionism’s personal life influenced his political impact. He discussed “Theodor Herzl: The Charismatic Leader” with the Minda de Gunzburg Center for European Studies.Q&ADerek PenslarCenter for European Studies: Your new biography,  “Theodor Herzl: The Charismatic Leader,” focuses on how Herzl’s personal crises as much as broader anti-Semitism propelled him into a leadership role. Do you believe this is particular to Herzl and Zionism, or do you see this as a larger pattern, particularly for charismatic leaders?Penslar: I think this is true for great political leaders across the board, in particular leaders of nationalist movements or anti-colonial movements.One of the main arguments in the book is that charisma is dialogic. What made Herzl a great leader was a combination of his own internal drives and the fact that he was the right man in the right place at the right time. Charisma means nothing if there’s no one to be charismatic for — the charismatic is defined by their audience. At the fin de siècle, there was a certain type of European Jew who was looking for a great leader, someone to inspire them. There was a Jewish national idea in the air. And then along came Herzl. He very much was the right man in the right place at the right time, who also had qualities of genius and leadership. And it didn’t hurt that he was a strikingly handsome man with a nice beard.CES: Although Herzl was raised in comfortable circumstances in Budapest, he fabricated a more dramatic family history to his first biographer, giving his Eastern European family a higher-status history as converts under the Spanish Inquisition. Would you discuss this in terms of his capacity for re-invention and elaborate on how this shaped the leader he became?Penslar: It certainly is typical of Herzl to invent a more colorful past, but it was not uncommon in his era for Jews of Ashkenazi [Eastern European] origin to try to tie themselves to the Sephardic [Spanish or Portuguese] past because it was associated with distinction, with a kind of Jewish royalty. Ashkanazim often believed in Sephardic superiority. There are, even to this day, Jews with quintessentially Ashkenazic backgrounds who insist that a certain branch of their family is Sephardic. It’s seen as exotic and ennobling.CES: Herzl identified with the Prussian nobility and tried several times to join the military. Would you discuss how this failure to assimilate as he’d hoped led to his search for an alternative?William Lee Frost Professor of Jewish History Derek Penslar’s new book is about the life and times of Theodor Herzl, the founder of modern Zionism. Photo courtesy Minda de Gunzburg Center for European StudiesPenslar: There is a critique of Zionism that Zionism is the ultimate form of assimilation because it presents Jews as a nation, like other nations, and claims Jews must have a homeland as other nations have a homeland and have a national language as other people have national languages. This goal of turning Jews into “normal” people is a form of assimilation. There are ultra-Orthodox Jews who to this day say that the state of Israel is essentially a carbon copy of a gentile state. Herzl’s Zionism does reflect, in a way, the desire to be a good European. He envisions a state where people will speak European languages and consume European culture. Even when he becomes a Zionist, there’s a part of him that is still connected with the goal of assimilation.CES: You detail Herzl’s neuroses, drawing a picture of a needy and immature man. Would you talk about how he displaced these needs from his marriage and family to a larger stage?Penslar: Herzl was very needy, overly attached to his parents, and rather narcissistic, and he could not find satisfaction in the role of husband. To be a good husband, to be a good spouse, you have to give of yourself, and you have to really be there for the other person. Also, Herzl couldn’t really be comfortable in the role of parent because, as we all know, parents sacrifice for their children. He was willing to sacrifice himself – but to a cause of his own making. He created the political Zionist movement. He was its center, and he felt empowered and adored. That’s very different from the humdrum pleasures of being a husband or a father.CES: Herzl found himself — and his voice ­— as a journalist in Paris. Would you elaborate on how this period shaped him or shaped his writing of his seminal work, The Jewish State?Penslar: Herzl was a journalist through and through. Even as a teenager, when he started writing his first journalistic pieces, he was a master of description and quick analysis. He knows how to get his point across quickly, and he knows how to conjure up effective imagery. He was also very good at evoking emotion when he wrote about the working classes and the suffering of the poor. He wrote in a way that evoked feelings of compassion and pity. In the same way, in his Zionist writings, he eloquently expressed the needs of the Jewish people. His journalism trained him how to write an effective political manifesto. “[Herzl] very much was the right man in the right place at the right time, who also had qualities of genius and leadership.” CES: Herzl’s conflicting feelings about Jewishness ­— vacillating on whether it was a religion or a race — seems to have led to his embrace of Zionism. Would you talk about this conflict and how Zionism resolved it?Penslar: Even though he himself was not religiously observant and he knew that many Jews in his day were not religiously observant, Herzl still saw the Jewish religion as a unifying force. He wrote that what unites Jews might ultimately be a sense of ethnicity, but that it is often defined through religion. The religion is ultimately a bond, even if we’re not religious people. Herzl believed that Jews shared a common sense of relationship with the God of Israel. Herzl’s novel Altneuland about an ideal future Jewish homeland is peppered with references to God, although the homeland he envisions is entirely secular.The story of Moses mattered a great deal to Herzl, largely because he thought he was a second Moses. He did not believe that Jews could be defined in racial terms because Jews from different parts of the world look so different. I think he was actually on to something about modern Jewish identity, which often flees from religion yet still relies on it.CES: How do you view the role of charismatic leaders like Herzl in our current crisis? Are they useful in rallying support or mass action, or do they distract from necessary actions or experts? Do you see any Herzl-like leaders emerging in this current crisis?Penslar: You need charismatic leaders to get things started. An anti-colonial movement that’s trying to throw off colonial oppression needs a charismatic leader like Gandhi or, if you’re starting a national movement from scratch, like Herzl. Once you have a well-established state, you want competence. You want people like Angela Merkel or, with all due respect, Justin Trudeau, who has turned out to be a much better leader than I would’ve given him credit for.last_img read more

SMC gift campaign begins

first_imgThe Class Gift Campaign (CGC), a student effort led in conjunction with the Office of Annual Giving, organized the Week. Shelby Herms, Class of 2013 CGC representative, said students’ donations to the Annual Fund go to their class’s CCG account and immediately impact the lives of Saint Mary’s women. “Your gifts accumulate over four years so that you can make a lasting and memorable gift to Saint Mary’s at graduation,” Herms said. “The Class of 2012 donated to the renovation of Angela Athletic facilities, which is one of the options for this year’s gift, as well as a scholarship in our class’s name.” CGC will host a table in the Spes Unica Atrium to collect gifts every morning this week from 9 a.m. to noon, Herms said. The group will sell mugs that say ‘Once a Belle, Always a Belle’ at the CGC table in the Student Center Atrium today through Friday. Tag Week BINGO will be in the West Wing of the Noble Family Dining Hall on Thursday at dinner. While gifts of all amounts are welcomed, Herms said the CGC is pushing for Tribute Gifts of $20.13 in honor of the graduating class. A Tribute Gift is a donation from a student that honors someone who helped with her Saint Mary’s education. Each tribute will be published in the Commencement edition of The Observer and the honoree will be notified by email, Herms said. “I think that [the] Class Gift Campaign is great because it allows us to recognize the gifts of past Belles by giving back to the College like they did,” Herms said. “I never realized just how much it takes to make the Saint Mary’s experience possible.” Junior Maddy Martin, Class of 2014 CGC representative, said she knows how important Tag Week is this year because of the College’s recent Capital Campaign launch to raise funds. “We are really pushing each class to give to their class gift in order to reach our goal dollar amount,” Martin said. “In regards to actual class gifts, the senior class votes at the end of their senior year where they want the gift to go to,” Martin said past classes have donated to the Spes Unica building and the restoration of the Sister Madeleva painting. The Class of 2012’s gift of more than  $20,000 was the largest class gift to date, she said. “I don’t think students realize how much it costs to keep this school running,” Martin said.  “We take for granted electricity and water bills because they are always taken care of for us. It is important for students to have this realization of just how much the College spends to keep us on campus because they are more likely to give back to the school.” Junior Lauren Bruner, Class of 2014 CGC co-chair, said although asking students for money is difficult, it is important to give back to the College. “Many students, including myself, would not be here without scholarships, which shows how vital donations are,” Bruner said. “It’s rewarding to be able to give back to the College and see your gift on campus.” Junior Jillian Fata said it is important for students to recognize the changes the College can make through the campaign.  Past gifts have gone to big project, but they have also gone directly to scholarships, meaning that a future Belle can have the same opportunities that we are fortunate enough to have every day,” Fata said. Class giving is a  important part of being a student as well as an alumna, Herms said. Last year, 7,450 alumnae and friends of the College made a gift to help with the College’s expenses. Twenty percent of the College’s budget is a result of this support, Herms said. “They contributed $10.5 million in gifts to support all aspects of our education – touching every corner of campus, from building new building), to installing wireless internet, to providing toilet paper and hand soap in our bathrooms,” Herms said. We need the help to continue providing the Saint Mary’s experience, and making a gift is a way to say thank you to all of the alumnae who have made your education possible!”,Monday marked the beginning of Saint Mary’s annual Tag Week, which aims to inform students about the costs of running the College and the importance of donations to the school. The Class Gift Campaign (CGC), a student effort led in conjunction with the Office of Annual Giving, organized the Week. Shelby Herms, Class of 2013 CGC representative, said students’ donations to the Annual Fund go to their class’s CCG account and immediately impact the lives of Saint Mary’s women. “Your gifts accumulate over four years so that you can make a lasting and memorable gift to Saint Mary’s at graduation,” Herms said. “The Class of 2012 donated to the renovation of Angela Athletic facilities, which is one of the options for this year’s gift, as well as a scholarship in our class’s name.” CGC will host a table in the Spes Unica Atrium to collect gifts every morning this week from 9 a.m. to noon, Herms said. The group will sell mugs that say ‘Once a Belle, Always a Belle’ at the CGC table in the Student Center Atrium today through Friday. Tag Week BINGO will be in the West Wing of the Noble Family Dining Hall on Thursday at dinner. While gifts of all amounts are welcomed, Herms said the CGC is pushing for Tribute Gifts of $20.13 in honor of the graduating class. A Tribute Gift is a donation from a student that honors someone who helped with her Saint Mary’s education. Each tribute will be published in the Commencement edition of The Observer and the honoree will be notified by email, Herms said. “I think that [the] Class Gift Campaign is great because it allows us to recognize the gifts of past Belles by giving back to the College like they did,” Herms said. “I never realized just how much it takes to make the Saint Mary’s experience possible.” Junior Maddy Martin, Class of 2014 CGC representative, said she knows how important Tag Week is this year because of the College’s recent Capital Campaign launch to raise funds. “We are really pushing each class to give to their class gift in order to reach our goal dollar amount,” Martin said. “In regards to actual class gifts, the senior class votes at the end of their senior year where they want the gift to go to,” Martin said past classes have donated to the Spes Unica building and the restoration of the Sister Madeleva painting. The Class of 2012’s gift of more than  $20,000 was the largest class gift to date, she said. “I don’t think students realize how much it costs to keep this school running,” Martin said.  “We take for granted electricity and water bills because they are always taken care of for us. It is important for students to have this realization of just how much the College spends to keep us on campus because they are more likely to give back to the school.” Junior Lauren Bruner, Class of 2014 CGC co-chair, said although asking students for money is difficult, it is important to give back to the College. “Many students, including myself, would not be here without scholarships, which shows how vital donations are,” Bruner said. “It’s rewarding to be able to give back to the College and see your gift on campus.” Junior Jillian Fata said it is important for students to recognize the changes the College can make through the campaign.  Past gifts have gone to big project, but they have also gone directly to scholarships, meaning that a future Belle can have the same opportunities that we are fortunate enough to have every day,” Fata said. Class giving is a  important part of being a student as well as an alumna, Herms said. Last year, 7,450 alumnae and friends of the College made a gift to help with the College’s expenses. Twenty percent of the College’s budget is a result of this support, Herms said. “They contributed $10.5 million in gifts to support all aspects of our education – touching every corner of campus, from building new building), to installing wireless internet, to providing toilet paper and hand soap in our bathrooms,” Herms said. We need the help to continue providing the Saint Mary’s experience, and making a gift is a way to say thank you to all of the alumnae who have made your education possible!”last_img read more

Broadway’s Violet to Record Cast Album

first_img Violet View Comments Kelli O’Hara Star Files Show Closed This production ended its run on Aug. 10, 2014 Derek Klena Cross-country road trip essentials: snacks, a map and Sutton Foster’s voice. PS Classics will record the cast album of the Roundabout production of Violet on April 7. The two-disk set will be released on June 3 and is currently available for pre-order on the PS Classics website. Two-time Tony winner Foster, Colin Donnell, Alexander Gemignani and Joshua Henry lead the cast in the Jeanine Tesori and Brian Crawley musical. Leigh Silverman directs the Broadway production.Violet follows a young woman’s Greyhound bus trip from North Carolina to Oklahoma. She travels in the hopes that a televangelist can heal her disfigured face. The musical follows her quest for beauty amidst the race and image-obsessed landscape of the 1960s.Violet begins preview performances on March 28 prior to an April 20 official opening at the American Airlines Theatre. Additional cast members include Annie Golden, Ben Davis, Austin Lesch, Anastacia McCleskey, Charlie Pollock, Emerson Steele and Rema Webb. Sutton Foster View All (4) Steven Pasquale Related Showslast_img read more

Spanish Judge Releases Alleged FARC Member

first_img On 16 February, a Spanish judge decided to release an alleged FARC member detained two days earlier in Madrid on suspicion of being a “liaison” for the Colombian guerrilla group in Europe, judicial sources reported. Judge Santiago Pedraz of the National High Court, Spain’s chief criminal court, decided to release Leyla Yolita O.M., 39, believing that she is not a flight risk, contrary to the opinion of the public prosecutor’s office, and taking into account the fact that she has refugee status. “There are no grounds for granting the precautionary measure of pretrial detention; the flight risk may be characterized as non-existent, given that she has refugee status in Spain and not in a third country to which she might flee,” the judge affirmed in his ruling, to which AFP had access. Nevertheless, Pedraz prohibited the detainee from leaving Spain and ordered her to keep the authorities informed of her whereabouts. On the day of the ruling, Leyla Yolita appeared before the judge, where she denied belonging to the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) and affirmed that she only belongs to the Communist Party and that she is “politically persecuted by her country,” the sources added. Leyla Yolita was detained in Madrid as part of “Operation Cali,” on suspicion of being a “member of the FARC-EP terrorist organization,” according to a police statement. According to Spanish law-enforcement authorities, the detainee “was responsible for specific liaison, support, and intermediary functions in Europe,” for which she was “in contact with members of this terrorist organization” and facilitated “their intervention in international forums.” “She was sought by Colombian judicial authorities for membership in that terrorist gang and for carrying out activities on behalf of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Columbia,” an organization included on the European Union (EU) lists of terrorist groups. By Dialogo February 17, 2011last_img read more

CIS-13: What Peru did when Continuing Promise 2013 was cancelled and how the U.S. supported

first_img Engineers from the Peruvian Peace Keeping and Disaster Response Engineering Company inaugurated a science laboratory for an elementary school servicing 2,500 students ages 6-16, culminating four weeks of training in preparation for an upcoming milestone deployment in 2014. The science laboratory in Talara, Peru represents the final chapter of the Peruvian Government’s “Campaña Inclusión Social Talara 2013” (CIS-13), a mission that replaced the U.S. Southern Command’s (SOUTHCOM) scheduled deployment the USNS COMFORT, a humanitarian civic assistance mission known as Continuing Promise 2013 (CP-13), in which free medical services were offered aboard the hospital ship as well as in local medical centers in the towns along its route. For several months the northern coast of Peru eagerly prepared to host the USNS COMFORT, a familiar visitor to Central and South American shores that last visited Peru in 2010. After months of careful preparation to include meetings and medical patient screening, news of CP-13’s cancellation in late April due to the U.S. Government’s sequestration disappointed many Peruvians. The cancellation was particularly troubling for Talara, a province known for its sharp contrast of wealthy petroleum companies and the poor living next to them. Continuing Promise, for many Peruvians became known as “Promesa Incumplida” or Broken Promise. As the Peruvian government scrambled to find an alternative, SOUTHCOM prepared to support Peru through the Humanitarian Assistance Program (HAP), which actively supports the Peruvian government with assistance in building disaster response capability and delivering carefully targeted humanitarian assistance to troublesome emergency zones and regions in-country. Although the mission the Peruvians eventually crafted for Talara did not come bundled on a hospital ship anchored a mile out to sea, the Peruvian version delivered valuable assistance with similar CP-13-type elements: Disaster Response Subject Matter Expert Exchanges (SMEEs), a disaster response field exercise, a five-day medical capability mission (MEDCAP), and an engineering capability development mission (ENCAP). When the dust settled, over 600 Peruvian personnel from the local, regional and nation levels participated in various SMEEs and 5,000 patients received medical care. In addition, the Peruvian government delivered two small construction projects and a myriad donations ranging from small kitchens to scholarships for the under-privileged. SOUTHCOM supported the effort with $350,000 towards the purchase of construction materials, medical supplies, personnel deployment and logistics support. Navy Forces South sent ten medical personnel and five engineers. Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences (USUHS) sent eight medical professionals and six students. Twelve additional personnel participated in the Disaster Response SMEEs from Army Southern Command, Defense Threat Reduction Agency, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and U.S. Southern Command. Other U.S. agencies also collaborated; USAID/OFDA sent four observers and a guest lecturer, and the Peace Corps volunteered six translators. In all, the U.S. foot print at any given moment included around 50 personnel while the Peruvians numbered around 300 – a much more favorable optic for the Peruvian government than CP-13’s 1,000 U.S. and 200 Peruvian. CIS-13 was a trailblazing and unique mission for Peru and likewise for the U.S. in its evolving supportive role. It was the first time the Peruvian Ministry of Defense organized and executed a humanitarian aid mission of this complexity and magnitude, doing so in less than 90 days. From the U.S. perspective, CIS 13 made a lot of sense not only from a geo-political standpoint, but also a financial one. Although Peru is a country accustomed to receiving foreign aid instead of providing it, it is also a country attempting to forge a new identity after two decades of continued economic growth. Peru desires to become a partner nation instead of an aid recipient, which is exactly the bilateral relationship the U.S wants to foster. Peru has consolidated its democratic rule and is looking to play a greater role in the region. For Peru’s leadership, delivering governance to areas outside of Lima is not only a priority for national sovereignty but also for prestige. Despite its many challenges, CIS-13 was a better fit for Peru than CP-13 for the following reasons: The Peruvians took ownership of the mission, it was tailored to Peruvian requirements, and most importantly, it was less costly to support. A key lesson to take away is that a small, yet consistent, U.S. footprint throughout the planning process gave the Peruvians confidence to take ownership of the plan and execute it. A larger U.S. contingent would have overshadowed the Peruvian efforts and made them turn to the U.S. when things became difficult. This sensation of control and comfort provided by a small U.S. foot print gave the Peruvians the flexibility to plan to the level of their resources instead of trying to meet a particular U.S. standard. One of the most valuable takeaways was the subject matter engagements between the U.S. doctors and the Peruvian medical students. Representing the younger generation of doctors, the Peruvian medical students were eager to learn best practices whereas an older Peruvian doctor, with his own practice in Lima and accustomed to doing things a certain way, may not. That young Peruvian medical student could become a future surgeon in a Peruvian hospital or choose to come to the U.S. to continue his/her education. It’s worth contrasting the price of this type of targeted engagement with engagements that emphasize sheer volume of surgical procedures, especially in the context of developing a long-term Peruvian medical capability. The Peruvian medical students who were initially invited to participate and act as translators ended up being the most valuable part of the medical exchange. COL John E. Atwood, a U.S. Army cardiologist, was so enthused about his engagement with the medical students that he took the time to write the Security Cooperation Office a letter in which he would recount, “Angel David Cueva Parra (Peruvian medical student) functioned as both an interpreter and diagnostician at the level of a physician…he made a great contribution to my ability to work effectively and efficiently.” Exchanges such as these further highlight that some of the highest impact activities of any humanitarian mission (CIS-13 included) are not expensive at all. Missions like CIS-13 are a good fit for countries like Peru: a country attempting to forge a new identity and now capable of providing aid. CIS-13 was a Peruvian-led and tailored mission that delivered a tremendous impact at a fraction of the cost of CP-13. The National University of Piura is a true cauldron of future professionals. It’s Medical School is accredited, from which Angel David Cueva Parra is graduating, who is currently focusing on his specialty studies. By Dialogo November 15, 2013last_img read more