(S)mash the Potato Market – Cllr Gilligan

first_imgEmail Linkedin Advertisement WhatsApp Twitter NewsLocal News(S)mash the Potato Market – Cllr GilliganBy admin – January 28, 2010 595 center_img Could be developed into a plazaLIMERICK’S Potato Market, located on Merchant’s Quay, could soon face the wrecking ball-with Cllr John Gilligan the driving force in a plan to convert it into a plaza.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Regarded for some time now as the “Cinderella” market, it has been used in recent years solely as a car park and compared to the popular Milk Market, currently undergoing refurbishment and restoration.Cllr John Gilligan has submitted a notice of motion to City Council that the old, originally cobbled market square, be demolished.The councillor, who attended the recent Annual General Meeting of the Market Trustees, has also informed that body of his recommendation, which, he told the Limerick Post, was “very favourably received.”His move at this particular point in time is a calculated one as the market was on course to be made a protected structure and as such, it could not be demolished.“It has no architectural merit and has not been used adequately for years now – it is a fine space going to waste but would cost a fortune to do it up – I suggest that we take down the entire area and make it into a plaza, which would open up the whole square and make it a very attractive public area that could be used for a lot of civic events, public and open air concerts, exhibitions and significant happenings in the city”. Cllr Gilligan said that he would like to see the market structure removed “up to the river – this would provide a clear view of the river, the Sylvester O’Halloran Bridge, the Hunt Museum, the marina, etc.“There would be a clear view of the river quays between the County Courthouse and Athlunkard Boat Club, which is the very location the first Vikings to arrive in Limerick landed on and built a settlement on. We could use the cut stone of the pillars at the market’s entrance to build a commemorative stone to King Brian Boru, who built his palace on the site of St Mary’s Cathedral – we’ve no suitable or impressive monument to him”.Confirming that the entrance from the market to the Sylvester O””Halloran Bridge and walkway is now coming away from the wall, Cllr Gilligan said it would “cost a small fortune” to rebuild it.“This is an opportune time to seriously consider demolishing the Potato Market and from what I gather, the idea is receiving favourable consideration in City Hall,” he said. Print Facebook Previous articleHigh rates a deterrent, argue property agentsNext articleA noise to remember adminlast_img read more

Fronts and habitat zones in the Scotia Sea

first_imgThe fronts in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) comprise the Southern ACC Front (SACCF), the Polar Front (PF) and Sub-Antarctic Front (SAF), which, together with the Southern Boundary (SB), separate zones with distinct water mass properties in the Southern Ocean. They are important for describing habitat ranges of oceanic species over the range of trophic levels and are also key habitat zones in their own right for a variety of species. Frontal positions were studied along a transect running S to N across the Scotia Sea during three hydrographic cruises in spring 2006, summer 2008 and autumn 2009. Subsurface data from these cruises and Argo data are here combined with Aviso satellite absolute dynamic topography data to locate these fronts, facilitating study of their ecological significance within the Scotia Sea. Northern and southern dynamic height limits are found for each front, as opposed to the more usual one dimensional line. Thus the SB was found between −132 to −116 dyn cm, the SACCF between −115 to −99 dyn cm and the PF between −71 to −45 dyn cm. Argo data allow the sensitivity of the dynamic heights found to be tested against seasonal, interannual and longitudinal effects and each is found to be small. Although the SAF lay beyond the northern extent of the transect we sampled along, Argo profiles allowed us to determine its limits as lying between −5 and +29 dyn cm. The dynamic height limits found are thus suitable for assessing the location, in relation to fronts, of any sample or tracked animal within this area. The chlorophyll distribution across the Scotia Sea is assessed relative to frontal positions and known iron sources. The physical conditions (sea surface temperature, sea ice and mixed layer depth) along the sampling transect are also presented, allowing the oceanographic conditions of the stations occupied across the Scotia Sea to be assessed.last_img read more