Limerick pride Festival 2017 gives youth a voice

first_imgAdvertisement This year’s Pride festival will run from Monday, July 10 to Sunday, July 16, the week-long festival will include workshops, support meetings and discussions as well as evening events in venues throughout the city. NewsLocal NewsLimerick pride Festival 2017 gives youth a voiceBy Cian Reinhardt – June 13, 2017 1108 Friends of Pride pictured at the launch of Limerick LGBT Pride Festival 2017 at the clayton Hotel. limerick Pride 2017 runs from July 10-16 with the parade on July 15. picture: Cian Reinhardt/ilovelimerickThe countdown to Limerick LGBTQ Pride Festival 2017 officially began with the launch at the Clayton Hotel in Limerick City on Monday, June 12 with the message of giving the youth of Limerick a voice. Limerick on Covid watch list RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Local backlash over Aer Lingus threat The annual Limerick LGBTQ Pride Parade on Saturday, July 15, will bring some pizzazz, music and colour to Limerick City Centre, gathering at City Hall at 1.30pm the Parade will make its way at 2.30pm sharp up O’Connell Street, across Mallow Street to Henry Street, past Arthurs Quay Park and returning to City Hall. After the parade people will gather at the Hunt Museum for the PrideFest party which includes special guests Hands in Harmony Deaf Community Choir and drag performances from Shyanne O’Shea and Charnell Clearwater among other performers. TAGSFestivalLGBT LimerickLimerick PrideNewspride festival 2017 WhatsApp Previous articleMinister Simon Harris officially opens Emergency DepartmentNext articleWav Mastering founder celebrates 30 vibrant years in music industry Cian Reinhardthttp://www.limerickpost.ieJournalist & Digital Media Coordinator. Covering human interest and social issues as well as creating digital content to accompany news stories. [email protected] Facebook Unstoppable Sean shows that all things are possible Shannon Airport braced for a devastating blow  That night after PrideFest, X-Factor star Saara Aalto will headline the Pride Climax Party at Dolans Warehouse with support from Limerick singer/songwriter Doreen Grimes. Email Vicky calls for right to die with dignity Print Speaking at the launch Lou McCormack, Chairperson Limerick LGBTQ Pride 2017 said, “There is something for everyone culminating in the annual Pride Parade and the PrideFest party directly after the Parade at the Hunt Museum.  We want to welcome everyone to join us in celebrating LGBTQ culture in Limerick and show Limerick for the truly open and accepting city that she is.” Linkedin Population of Mid West region increased by more than 3,000 in past year Friends of Pride pictured at the launch of Limerick LGBT Pride Festival 2017 at the clayton Hotel. limerick Pride 2017 runs from July 10-16 with the parade on July 15. picture: Cian Reinhardt/ilovelimerickRichard Lynch, PRO Limerick LGBTQ Pride 2017 said, “our theme this year is Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgendered (LGBTQ) Youth. Ireland voted YES to same-sex marriage in 2015, a new generation has spoken who were responsible for that historic victory. This generation is our future leaders and we want to give them a platform as the voice of a new Ireland.” Twitterlast_img read more

Dicamba Battle Lines Drawn

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Emily UnglesbeeDTN Staff ReporterARLINGTON, Va. (DTN) — At a state pesticide regulatory meeting this week, some state officials threatened to stop reporting their dicamba damage incidents to the EPA during the 2019 growing season, after their past reporting efforts did not bring about substantial changes to agency’s dicamba registrations.“They felt like they provided a lot of information [in 2018], and it took a lot of their staff time to generate that information, but they don’t feel that was reflected in any of the dicamba label statements, so states are kind of questioning whether that was a good use of their time,” explained Rose Kachadoorian, president of the Association of American Pesticide Control Officials (AAPCO), who led the meeting of the organization’s State FIFRA Research and Evaluation Group (SFIREG) in Arlington, Virginia, on June 3-4.Last year, state officials participated in weekly phone calls with the EPA and submitted an array of data on dicamba injury reports. This year, EPA is proposing that state regulators continue to collect injury data throughout the growing season and then use it to answer a single, end-of-the-season survey for the federal agency to review.Brian Verhougstraete, a Michigan pesticide regulator, represented the EPA Region 5 states of Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio and Wisconsin at the meeting. He said several of those states may not cooperate with the proposed survey at all, based on their experience of reporting injury data in 2018.“To be quite blunt: What did we get out of it?” he said. “The way most states saw it is we got more…labels with vague and unenforceable terms, and we also now have a bunch of extra work on our certification programs. There will be some serious thoughts by states on whether they will participate — and they may not even have the time, because they’ll be too busy with [dicamba] investigations.”While dropping these communication efforts might save time for states, it will also leave EPA with fewer independent sources of information on off-target dicamba injury. In the past, the agency has relied primarily on Extension scientists, state regulators and dicamba registrants to supply information on injury reports and causes.Several state pesticide regulators also objected to the questions EPA is asking on a draft version of the 2019 end-of-the-season survey on dicamba injury. Many of the proposed questions are aimed at helping EPA write better labels, but none address the extensive time and resources required to address dicamba injury in some states, Kachadoorian told DTN. Nor do any of the questions evaluate the potential human health impacts of state pesticide regulators neglecting their routine inspections to focus solely on a barrage of dicamba complaints, she said.“There is a price tag to this registration, and that price tag is not being borne by the pesticide registrants or the EPA, but by the state’s budgets,” she said. “It is a possibility” that some states will not respond at all to the agency’s survey this year if EPA continues to ignore these issues, she added.“But we hope that if [EPA] adds more questions that will actually benefit states by documenting their efforts and the cost to their state, that they’ll be more apt to do it,” she said.2019 DICAMBA APPLICATIONS LOOM OVER DISTRESSED STATE AGENCIESWith only 39% of soybeans planted in the U.S. as of June 3, dicamba applications have been minimal in most states, but some regulators are already a year or more behind any future injury complaints, noted Tim Creger, a Nebraska pesticide regulator who represented the EPA Region 7 states of Iowa, Kansas, Missouri and Nebraska at the meeting.The Missouri Department of Agriculture, which is still processing dicamba injury complaints from 2016, only recently started processing 2017 cases, and has not touched their 2018 workload of 220 complaints yet, Creger noted in his written notes submitted to the meeting. Regulators in Kansas and Iowa are only halfway through processing their 2018 dicamba injury complaints, he added.“One of the primary take-home messages we’ve seen in the last two years on dicamba is it’s become extremely difficult to keep field staff employed when they get burned out on dicamba investigations,” Creger told the meeting participants. “We had one state that lost nine inspectors in the last 18 months because of dicamba, and now they’ve had to almost fully restock their entire field staff,” he said of the Missouri Department of Agriculture.Creger said many of the Region 7 states are using a “triage” mindset when it comes to addressing dicamba injury complaints in 2019. The Nebraska Department of Agriculture will now require photographic evidence of 20% leaf damage or greater after the V4 growth stage before regulators respond to most crop injury reports, he said. Non-crop injury reports will be handled on a case-by-case basis.“You would like to think everyone is treated equally, but resources are limited,” he said. “People don’t get treated equally, and it’s become a very difficult, untenable situation for us.”Verhougstraete also said some Region 5 state officials witnessed companies mismanaging the dicamba training sessions that were required for applicators to use dicamba this year. Some were described as “sales pitches,” or only lasted 30 minutes instead of the advertised two hours, with people openly wandering in and out of the sessions.“Is that not fair when states are being held to a higher standard when it comes to ensuring applicators are getting certification training?” he asked EPA representatives in attendance. “Shouldn’t the registrants be held to the same standard?”See more on the meeting from AAPCO here: https://aapco.org/…Emily Unglesbee can be reached at [email protected] her on Twitter @Emily_Unglesbee(PS/BAS)© Copyright 2019 DTN/The Progressive Farmer. All rights reserved.last_img read more

After Effects Video Tutorial: Storm Clouds in Trapcode Particular

first_imgLearn how to create realistic clouds in this Trapcode tutorial.Trapcode Particular is a powerful third party plugin that offers functionality beyond the capabilities of the built-in particle generators in After Effects. One such: Particular can generate particles based on pictures, layers, and compositions. This is admittedly my favorite Particular feature, as it allows you to create some stunning results.We previously posted 10 Amazing Trapcode Particular Tutorials. While this list definitely features some of the best Trapcode tutorials online, we found another this week that deserves to be featured. The following tutorial was released by Ramiro Fernandez and demonstrates how to create realistic storm clouds using Particular.  Concepts covered include:Using images as particlesCreating particle environmentsCompositing cloudsGenerating rainObviously, this tutorial requires Trapcode Particular to work. It is available to purchase or as a free trial on the Red Giant Software site.We would have done without the instrumental track under the tutorial – it’s a bit distracting – but the Particular technique is great. Learn how to create storm clouds in Particular:Have any tips for making this effect better? Share in the comments below.last_img read more

Early life stress linked to depression

Early life stress linked to depression

first_imgEarly life stress is a major risk factor for later episodes of depression and people who are abused or neglected as children are almost twice as likely to experience depression later in life, says a new study.There may also be diminished processing of reward in the brain and associated reductions in a person’s ability to experience positive emotions. Researchers at Duke University and the University of Texas Health Sciences Centre at San Antonio recruited 106 adolescents, between the ages of 11-15, who underwent an initial magnetic resonance imaging scan, along with measurements of mood and neglect. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’The researchers focused on the ventral striatum, a deep brain region that is important for processing rewarding experiences as well as generating positive emotions, both of which are deficient in depression. “Our analyses revealed that over a two-year window during early to mid-adolescence, there was an abnormal decrease in the response of the ventral striatum to reward only in adolescents who had been exposed to emotional neglect,” said first author Jamie Hanson.Emotional neglect is a form of childhood adversity where parents are persistently emotionally unresponsive and unavailable to their children, researchers said. This study suggests that, in some people, early life stress compromises the capacity to experience enthusiasm or pleasure.last_img read more