(S)mash the Potato Market – Cllr Gilligan

first_imgEmail Linkedin Advertisement WhatsApp Twitter NewsLocal News(S)mash the Potato Market – Cllr GilliganBy admin – January 28, 2010 595 center_img Could be developed into a plazaLIMERICK’S Potato Market, located on Merchant’s Quay, could soon face the wrecking ball-with Cllr John Gilligan the driving force in a plan to convert it into a plaza.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Regarded for some time now as the “Cinderella” market, it has been used in recent years solely as a car park and compared to the popular Milk Market, currently undergoing refurbishment and restoration.Cllr John Gilligan has submitted a notice of motion to City Council that the old, originally cobbled market square, be demolished.The councillor, who attended the recent Annual General Meeting of the Market Trustees, has also informed that body of his recommendation, which, he told the Limerick Post, was “very favourably received.”His move at this particular point in time is a calculated one as the market was on course to be made a protected structure and as such, it could not be demolished.“It has no architectural merit and has not been used adequately for years now – it is a fine space going to waste but would cost a fortune to do it up – I suggest that we take down the entire area and make it into a plaza, which would open up the whole square and make it a very attractive public area that could be used for a lot of civic events, public and open air concerts, exhibitions and significant happenings in the city”. Cllr Gilligan said that he would like to see the market structure removed “up to the river – this would provide a clear view of the river, the Sylvester O’Halloran Bridge, the Hunt Museum, the marina, etc.“There would be a clear view of the river quays between the County Courthouse and Athlunkard Boat Club, which is the very location the first Vikings to arrive in Limerick landed on and built a settlement on. We could use the cut stone of the pillars at the market’s entrance to build a commemorative stone to King Brian Boru, who built his palace on the site of St Mary’s Cathedral – we’ve no suitable or impressive monument to him”.Confirming that the entrance from the market to the Sylvester O””Halloran Bridge and walkway is now coming away from the wall, Cllr Gilligan said it would “cost a small fortune” to rebuild it.“This is an opportune time to seriously consider demolishing the Potato Market and from what I gather, the idea is receiving favourable consideration in City Hall,” he said. Print Facebook Previous articleHigh rates a deterrent, argue property agentsNext articleA noise to remember adminlast_img read more

How To: Grayson Highlands State Park

first_imgGrayson Highlands State Park is an easy portal to the vast 120,000-acre Mount Rogers National Recreation Area in Southwest Virginia. In fact, Grayson Highlands was originally called Mount Rogers State Park when it opened in 1965.  The Highlands  are an expansive windswept grassland with fields of rocky outcroppings, which offer spectacular views of the region’s tallest peaks. Grayson Highlands also boasts plush backcountry camping spots and the occasional sighting of wild ponies. The miniature horses often ask visitors for handouts; state park officials ask that you resist the temptation to feed them, which leads to nuisance and health problems for the horses.Summit RogersFrom Grayson Highlands you can easily bag the biggest peak in Virginia, 5,729-foot Mount Rogers. The biggest reward about topping Rogers isn’t standing at its summit, which is engulfed in forest, but the scenic eight-mile round-trip jaunt. Starting at Massie Gap, follow the Rhododendron Trail to the Appalachian Trail. Along the way you’ll cross the outcroppings of Wilburn Ridge, which offers panoramic views of the Highlands Range. In late spring and early summer, enjoy colorful thickets of wildflowers as you cross through Rhododendron Gap at the juncture with the A.T., which then goes on to the summit.Sleep UNDER THE STARSThe state park has 96 established campsites with nearby toilets, grill pits, and a general store with other creature comforts. But Grayson Highlands also affords an abundance of appealing backcountry slumber options. Just jump on the A.T. and you’ll run into a number of inviting open fields with grassy plots that are perfect for a night under the stars.Road to DamascusFor local eats and accommodations, head into the quaint little trail town of Damascus, located 20 miles west of the park on Route 58. Grab a quaint cottage at Creeper Trail Cottages (creepercottage.com), or work up an appetite with a bike ride (sundogoutfitter.com) on the Virginia Creeper Trail. Damascus sits midway along the 34-mile rail trail, which runs from Abingdon to Whitetop Station.last_img read more