EXCLUSIVE: first trailer for Lions RAW DVD

first_imgYou’ve seen them win, now see what they were like behind the scenes: Check out the exclusive first trailer for RAWRUGBY WORLD can exclusively reveal the first trailer for the 2013 British and Irish Lions’ fly on the wall documentary, RAW.Out on October 28, this no-holds-barred first-hand look at the victorious tourists training, interacting and ultimately winning is a must for any Lions fan. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS You can pre-order your copy here.If you like this, how about you buy the November edition of Rugby World where Matt Dawson talks us through dice, drinks and high jinks from Australia!last_img read more

Hotshots: Ayr back Emily Irving

first_imgRW verdict: Irving has come a long way in a short time and is highly rated within the Scotland set-up.Want to keep up to date with the latest Hotshots? Why not subscribe to Rugby World? Click here for the latest deals, or find out how to download the digital edition here. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS What is your next aim?I have been told I will play for Scotland this year. I have trained with the sevens and national squads this season, but couldn’t play in the World Cup qualifiers because I wasn’t 18 until September.Do you miss out on things other 18-year-olds do? The social side of rugby is brilliant, but if I want to take my career further I have to be sensible about it.center_img When did you first play rugby? In March 2012. I played football from when I was three until about 13, then in my last year at school I was asked to play in a charity rugby match against the boys’ team. After that the local development officer, Stuart Fenwick, took some of us to play in a tournament in Edinburgh.Did you learn quickly? Yes. I think it helped that I’d played so much football.Which positions have you played in rugby? Last year I was playing stand-off and this season I play inside-centre for Ayr and wing for Scotland U20.last_img read more

Five things we’ve learnt: Ireland v Italy

first_img Sea of green: The Olympic Stadium ressembled a home game for Ireland Okay, so we didn’t really learn this because we knew it already but Iain Henderson‘s worth to the side is growing by the week. He’s the new Eben Etzebeth. He’s been Ireland’s best carrier in the tournament and his sheer brutish strength is astonishing. He also showcased his ability to hold players up to enforce a choke tackle turnover- so beloved of Les Kiss. To think it was only three weeks ago he wasn’t certain to be in the team.Sean O’Brien needs to ImproveHe was credited with the most carries over the gain line, but they can’t have been very far over the gain line. Sean O’Brien doesn’t look at his explosive ball-carrying breakdown-demolishing best. Ireland really need him to be because we don’t really have any other players who can do what he does. However, we do have Chris Henry available and he brings something different, but no less useful: nuisance value. Ireland won a six nations with O’Brien injured and it was Henry who took his place, and excelled, so we doubt that Schmidt is afraid to use the Ulsterman if it’s the best pick. O’Brien needs to rediscover his mojo.The Monday video review will be grim Ireland edged past a resiliant Italian side yesterday but there are plenty of things to work on, including sloppy handling and poor discipline. Thank goodness for Iain Henderson By Whiff of CorditeIreland and Italy served up a steaming dose of Six Nations mediocrity on Sunday, bringing a series of scratches to a sprakling weekend of quicksilver rugby…from the Southern Hemisphere nations. While it would be churlish to quibble over qualification for the quarter-finals, since it equates to the best we have ever achieved, and also given we have recent experience of not doing so, but this was not a performance or a scoreline for the ages. If Italy had a hooker who could throw, we may very well be having a different conversation today. But what have we learnt?Highlight: Peter O’Mahony’s tackle on Josh Furno was superbIreland can still be wretchedJoe Schmidt has worked hard to make Ireland more consistent. He inherited a team that was best known for its wildly fluctuating performance level, the best example being thumped by New Zealand by 60 points, a week after narrowly losing at the death in Christchurch, and over two years has brought them to a place where they usually perform to a decent base level. They won’t always win, but at least we know they’ll show up. So it’s somewhat reassuring to see they can still be truly, utterly awful when the occasion demands it. This was a rotten performance with shapeless attack, a poor aerial game and an ocean of turnovers. If Italy had a lineout the result might have been different.Ireland will be better against FranceGames the week before a crunch match can be like that. Everyone wants the game out of the way so they can focus on the big one. And it’s hard to imagine Ireland playing this badly when minds are sharply focused against France. There’s also the distinct possibility that Ireland want to reveal as little as possible before their most important pool match. Expect to hear plenty of suggestions for changes to the team, but barring the return of Rob Kearney and Jared Payne, it’s likely to be the same team that takes on the French. And so it should be; the best XV is on the pitch. Conor Murray and Sean O’Brien are unlikely to play so poorly two weeks in a row, are they?Return: Ireland are hoping Rob Kearney will be fit for France at the weekendIain Henderson is the mancenter_img Video nasty: Anyone who made mistakes in the game will be under scrutinySchmidt’s Monday video reviews have become notorious and this one should go on until the early hours of Tuesday morning. It was that sloppy. None of the starting team will be looking forward to this one. After Simon Zebo put a kick past the dead ball line, he looked like a man who had already fast-forwarded to the video session in his mind. And the likes of Shane Horgan have been vocal about the emphasis Schmidt puts on his teams being aerially dominant. It’s hard to recall more than one kick that they won back. Throw in the multiple knock ons, indiscipline and mediocre mauling and the players are looking at a long, painful session. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

Analysis: Guy Thompson embodies grit and graft of Wasps

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Those are the attributes that are hardening Wasps into resilient Premiership contenders and driving Thompson’s claim for an England place.Images courtesy of BT Sport Guy Thompson began September 3, the first day of the Championship season, sitting on the fence. With Jersey travelling to newly-promoted Richmond, two of his previous teams were in action. Via the accepted modern medium of Twitter, the 29 year-old wished luck to both sides.As it happened, Jersey ran out 41-16 winners. Regardless of that result, Thompson spent the next day with current employers Wasps. Starting at openside flanker, he helped carve out a 25-20 victory over Exeter Chiefs at the Ricoh Arena.Three weeks later, Dai Young’s men are four from four and top of the Premiership tree. Their glittering backline and Galacticos recruitment policy get spoken about a great deal, but the back row has been a real strength.Alongside Nathan Hughes, a one-man highlight reel, Wasps also boast Thomas Young and Academy graduate Sam Jones – two dynamic, honest grafters. Thompson also fits that mould and, as demonstrated by his rampaging try against Toulon in January when he barrelled through Juan Smith and Duane Vermeulen, he cares very little for reputations.While James Haskell recovers from injury, these figures are bringing toughness to the tackle area and breakdown. Each of them carries like a locomotive too. Saturday’s 20-15 defeat of Northampton Saints was Wasps’ most significant victory yet, owing far more to tenacity than fluid phase-play.In front of a watching Steve Borthwick, Thompson was excellent. Given Haskell and Jack Clifford will be absent for the autumn internationals, he did his hopes of snatching an England cap no harm. Here is a run-down of Thompson’s display.Isolated, not destroyedIf forwards are comfortable in space, it is far easier for their team to impart width in attack. For instance, the manner in which New Zealand‘s forwards fill the field allows them to stretch defences on each flank and push opponents past breaking point.Already this season, Thompson has shown his penchant for linking with backs in the 15-metre channel and marauding forward to munch up metres. But besides offering themselves as carrying outlets and in an expansive structure, forwards stationed out wide are also vital for ball retention.On Saturday, Saints went ahead early on thanks to a slick team try finished by George North. However, Wasps hauled their way back. We join the match as Nic Groom finds Harry Mallinder. Take note of Thompson’s initial position, on the right of the defensive line:Mallinder clears and Elliot Daly begins to retreat……so when Christian Wade recovers the ball, the young centre is past the halfway line:Wade counters, stepping off his left foot towards the right touchline. Seeing a strong Northampton chase, Thompson arcs around in support:Wade looks to beat Louis Picamoles. Although the France number eight is agile enough to make the tackle, Wade slips an offload to Daly. However, George Pisi skates across rapidly……and engulfs Daly in a strong challenge. Thankfully for Wasps, Thompson has tracked the attack well:When Daly hits the ground, Pisi, Picamoles and Tom Wood look to contest for the ball:But Thompson adopts a lower position than Pisi, thrusting his head under the Samoan centre’s chest while just about supporting his own bodyweight. Daly helps out by placing the ball towards arriving scrum-half Joe Simpson:When the power from Picamoles and Wood comes through, Thompson is forced upwards into a weaker position and the ball is threatened……but then Pisi loses balance and falls through on to Simpson:Referee Luke Pearce is quick to identify an offence that has been highlighted in officials’ directives for this campaign……and Wasps emerge from a potentially tricky situation with a penalty, largely due to Thompson’s technique and strength at the attacking breakdown. Not long afterwards, his defensive capabilities were called upon.Scrapping and spoilingAfter this game, Thompson explained that Wasps had expected a thoroughly “direct” challenge from an outfit that “base themselves on big collisions from big players”. The assessment was proved astute. Saints deployed a robust, confrontational approach.Here, during a prolonged period of possession five metres out from the Wasps line, Groom launches loosehead prop Alex Waller: Panning out, we can see that Thompson, initially stationed on the right of the previous ruck, is edging to his left:After Wade and the irrepressible Matt Symons combine to stop Waller, Thompson circles around to the left of the breakdown with James Gaskell…He adopts the role of guard, pushing Gaskell out further so Wasps’ defensive line is not overly bunched:From a wider angle, we can see Wasps’ arrangement. The entire back row, plus Gaskell, are in place on the left side of the ruck. Ken Pisi storms back against the grain……but Jones steps up to make a dominant tackle and Thompson swoops towards the ball. It is worth taking note of the clock at this point as the breakdown begins:Rather than moving the ball away, Groom must resource the ruck to nullify Thompson’s threat:Thompson forces Groom to the ground, meaning Kieran Brookes has to charge in……hitting the flanker as he steps through the tangle of bodies in an attempt to disrupt the platform of stand-in scrum-half Ben Foden:When Foden does release the pass to Stephen Myler, three seconds have elapsed. Myler is outnumbered by Wasps defenders that have been allowed precious time to organise themselves:Northampton’s fly-half throws the ball back left to North. Meanwhile, next to Tommy Taylor, Thompson gets to his feet:Hooker Taylor, already proving to be an excellent signing for Wasps, brings down North. Thompson, standing again, is alert……and pounces before the ruck forms in plain view of Pearce. Start the breakdown clock once more:As tackler Taylor rolls away, he impedes Waller, who is looking to clear the ruck. Sam Dickinson cannot shift Thompson, so Northampton’s recycling speed is sapped. Gaskell moves back into the guard role, helping Wasps to set their defensive structure:  Eventually Thompson is shunted off the ball. He obviously feels he has earned a penalty:Even so, his interference has caused the ruck to last between four and five seconds. Because of this, Wasps have men on their feet in a strong-looking line when Groom hits first-receiver Foden:One phase later, after a run from Courtney Lawes, Myler is faced with a sturdy set of tacklers.He conducts a classic shield play, passing  to Mallinder behind the decoy line of Picamoles:And when Mallinder drops off an inside pass to blindside wing Ken Pisi, a sizeable gap has been manipulated. It appears Wasps’ resistance might finally have been broken:However, Jake Cooper-Woolley and Danny Cipriani readjust brilliantly to shut the door and force a knock-on:So far this season, there has been a steel about Wasps. And they still have the style to score tries from nothing.Smash and grabEven deep inside the Wasps 22, this scrum delineates the effect of having two playmakers at fly-half and inside centre. The presence of Cipriani on the blindslide to complement Jimmy Gopperth on the openside requires North to ensure both touchlines are covered:Here are the respective starting positions of Gopperth, Thompson and Cipriani at the scrum. These are the three players to slice open Saints:Simpson feeds the scrum……and a decent shove from Northampton means Hughes is under pressure on picking up the ball. He releases an offload to Simpson as Wood and Picamoles break from the scrum:Still though, Simpson manages to release the ball to Cipriani……who sees that North is pressing flat and drops the ball to boot:The grubber is weighted wonderfully, allowing Cipriani and Wade to chase. Thompson and Gopperth make tracks upfield – showing pace and anticipation to get into open space:When Cipriani regathers, both Thompson and Gopperth are into their stride:Thompson collects an acrobatic flick from Cipriani that takes out Foden……and calmly draws a scrambling Ken Pisi to send Gopperth under the posts:As well as athleticism, this score accentuates a considerable degree of instinctive rugby intelligence in reacting to an unexpected attack from Cipriani. Wasps went ahead. Soon though, they needed to withstand more Northampton pressure. Turnover assistWe begin this passage with Saints in the fifth phase of a foray that has brought them on to Wasps’ five-metre line again. Mallinder locates Dickinson with another inside pass while Thompson, some 15 metres infield, looks over at the action:Rather than gravitate towards the tackle area though, Thompson keeps his discipline and retains the integrity of Wasps’ defensive structure. Symons fells Dickinson……and Jamie Gibson picks from the next breakdown, attacking the left fringe where Wade and Cipriani stop him:Now, Groom decides to bounce back to the right. Thomas Young and Mullan station themselves in the guard and bodyguard positions……with Taylor and Thompson further out, either side of Hughes. Supported by Waller and Mike Haywood, Picamoles is primed for another carry. Identifying the chief threat, Thompson speeds out of the blocks looking to chop down the Frenchman behind the gain-line:Perhaps after noticing Thompson’s aggressive line-speed in his peripheral vision to the right, Picamoles comes back inside:Thompson and Taylor combine for a strong, low tackle that puts Picamoles to ground immediately. The carrier also falls towards Mullan and Thomas Young. With Waller obstructed by the tacklers, there is a perfect chance for the steal:Sure enough, Thomas Young and Mullan clasp on to the ball before Waller can clear…Thompson then gets to his feet, obstructing Haywood as Dickinson struggles to shift Thomas Young……before curving back into the defensive line as Taylor rolls clear. Thomas Young and Mullan are still clamped to the ball……and Pearce whistles to penalise Picamoles and extinguish the attack:Fittingly, another desperate defensive effort from Wasps ended the half.Rescue actOn the final play of the first stanza, Saints talisman Wood trucks ahead with Daly grasping his foot. Thompson arrives at the scene……and bundles his rival to the floor. Start the breakdown clock as Wood rolls over, cleverly making himself a moving target for anyone looking to compete on the floor:Rather than release the tackled player before contesting, Thompson attacks the ball straightway – deliberately slowing Saints’ attempt to recycle and forcing Foden to join Waller in the ruck:When Groom can release the pass, another precious four seconds have elapsed:Picamoles takes the ball into contact again, before Northampton spread the ball wide. Take note of Thompson’s starting position:Mallinder finds George Pisi……who cuts back inside, coming within three metres of the try-line before Taylor tackles him. Cipriani is brilliant here, swooping back……and adopting the right guard position as Haywood picks:Out of nowhere, Thompson then arrives on the scene. He dives into the tackle area, wrapping himself around Haywood……and compelling Pearce to rule that the ball is held up over the line:After the break, Wasps’ rearguard continued.Exit strategySitting in the Franklin’s Gardens stands, Borthwick would have been watching out for understated details, especially those regarding the set piece. Presented with this scrum early in the second half, Wasps needed to execute a cool, clinical pattern to clear their lines:Simpson puts the ball in……and Hughes careers off the base. Kyle Eastmond and Thompson are in support as he bypasses Gibson……and reaches the channel between fly-half Myler and inside centre Mallinder:Thompson and Eastmond latch on at this point, driving Hughes through contact……and helping to service the ensuing breakdown:Wasps have secure the ball and forged a good angle for the clearance, but Picamoles gets impatient. He dives through on to Simpson……and is pinged by Pearce:Wasps find touch from the penalty and used the resulting lineout as a launchpad for Thompson.Race around the cornerStationed at the tail of the lineout……Thompson demonstrates further set-piece diligence with a supporting lift on Jones:Simpson finds Eastmond and the code-hopper careers towards the gain-line. Now, we have examined how a zig-zag pattern of attack can catch out overeager defences that fold past the breakdown too quickly.Here though, we see completely different tactics. Seven members of the Saints pack are inside the ball as Eastmond steps in. Note Taylor and Thompson aiming ‘around the corner’ – past the imminent tackle towards the right-hand side of the field:Daly wrestles Wood off the ball, and though Gibson and Waller manage to join a concerned George Pisi on the Northampton left……there are still five forwards redundant on the blindside as Simpson sends up Taylor with Thompson arcing around. Here, you can see the distance he has travelled from the lineout before even touching the ball:Gibson steps out of the line to confront Taylor, but a deft pass transfers to Thompson and a dog-leg is exposed. The gap between Waller and George Pisi is inviting……and Thompson has the power to burst through it:He stays firm in the collision……before surging away from it, swinging the ball under his right arm to fend off Picamoles with his left:Thompson escapes from the ex-Toulouse icon……and brings the ball back into two hands to burst the cover tackle of Ken Pisi:When Thompson is finally brought down by Picamoles and Groom, who has tracked all the way back from the front of the initial lineout, Wasps are in a dangerous position:Symons flies in to recycle, Thompson presenting the ball to Simpson……who follows up to find Gopperth:Despite facing a glaring overlap, Saints scramble extremely well to derail this attack. Even so, Thompson’s more eye-catching traits have hauled Wasps on to the front foot.Explosive carrying will remain a big part of what he brings to the table as a player. But to ignore the less conspicuous things – tireless defence, breakdown disruption, off-the-ball energy, clever support lines – would be to sell Thompson short. England’s openside berth is vacant again, and Guy Thompson is enjoying a superb start to the Premiership season for unbeaten Wasps.last_img read more

‘Sacred Acts’ translates climate change intentions into religious action

first_img‘Sacred Acts’ translates climate change intentions into religious action Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Youth Minister Lorton, VA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Advocacy Peace & Justice, Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Environment & Climate Change Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR [Episcopal News Service] Although global warming has become politicized in Congress, there is one public arena with more agreement than discord on the need to address climate change: that’s among our religious leadership in the Episcopal Church.Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Shori, has testified before the Senate environment committee on the connection between global poverty and climate change. The Genesis Covenant challenges all church facilities in the Episcopal Church to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions by 50 percent within 10 years.While many lay and ordained leaders acknowledge the scientific consensus that human actions have caused the planet’s warming, it’s harder to translate that knowledge into action at a congregational level.As a lifelong Episcopalian, I traveled across the country with my two children to document how churches were integrating the environment into their ministries: the result was a book called Natural Saints. My research revealed a need for stories about how congregations were confronting climate change, the greatest moral crisis of our time.To that end, Sacred Acts: How Churches are Working to Protect Earth’s Climate includes the writings of national leaders such as Bill McKibben, the Rev. Sally Bingham, founder and director of Interfaith Power & Light, and Katharine Hayhoe, climate scientist and evangelical.But the focus of this anthology is on voices from local congregations that are harvesting food from church gardens, weatherizing parish halls, installing solar panels on sanctuaries, and advocating against mountaintop removal. Georgia Interfaith Power & Light, for example, has completed 76 energy audits of religious facilities, saving congregations 20 percent of their energy budgets: 200 more congregations are in the pipeline.While the book is ecumenical in scope, many of the contributors have ties to the Episcopal Church. Ragan Sutterfield writes about faith and food at places like Christ Church in Little Rock, Arkansas, where the kitchen becomes a biweekly pick-up point for an online farmers market, which reduces carbon emissions and promotes local economies.Sacred Acts is organized around four avenues for addressing climate change – stewardship, spirituality, advocacy, and justice – with three chapters in each section.Writing about stewardship, the Rev. Fletcher Harper, an Episcopal priest and executive director of GreenFaith, describes his work with congregations on projects such as installing solar panels at the United Methodist Church in Red Bank, New Jersey, which now generate 30 percent of the congregation’s energy or conducting an energy audit at Shiloh Baptist Church in Trenton, New Jersey, with $7,000 in annual savings.The Rev. Brian Cole, at Church of the Good Shepherd in Lexington, Kentucky, tackles spirituality and climate change, addressing the challenge of preaching when the climate is warming. Through advocacy, Michele McGeoy, the executive director of Solar Richmond, has partnered with congregations in California in a green-jobs training program that prepares youth to work in the solar industry. Parishes such as St. John’s Episcopal Church in Oakland, California, hired a graduate of Solar Richmond’s program to help install solar panels on its church, thus lowering its carbon footprint, and promoting economic justice.Jill Rios, worshipped at La Capilla de Santa Maria in Hendersonville, North Carolina, for five years with her husband the Rev. Austin Rios. In her role with North Carolina Interfaith Power & Light, Jill focused on climate justice, working with parishioners on sustainable building projects at the church, which ministers to Spanish-speaking immigrants from Latin America. She examines the connections between faith and justice, given the growing number of climate refugees forced to leave their homes due to climate change.Some skeptics might protest that churches are unprepared to confront global warming when memberships and budgets are shrinking. Others might say people of faith lack the capacity to act with consensus around a politically divisive issue.But history tells me that Christians have mobilized around moral and political issues such as the anti-slavery and civil rights movement. And as editor of this book, I realized how climate change has brought together diverse religious denominations, from evangelicals to Episcopalians, who often disagree about issues such as abortion or same-sex marriage.The voices in Sacred Acts reveal that we must reinvigorate churches through climate action that reflects loving our neighbor as ourselves. Our liturgy prepares us for sacred acts of resistance that can reconcile us with the earth, each other, and ultimately with God. And that’s the kind of Episcopal Church I want for my children.— Mallory McDuff teaches at Warren Wilson College and is the author of two books about faith and the environment: “Natural Saints” and “Sacred Acts.” She worships at The Cathedral of All Souls in Asheville, North Carolina. Featured Events Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Rector Columbus, GA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Press Release Service Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit an Event Listing Rector Albany, NY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET By Mallory McDuffPosted Mar 16, 2012 Submit a Press Release This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Martinsville, VA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Comments are closed. Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Tampa, FL Tags Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Bath, NC Comments (1) Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Pittsburgh, PA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Washington, DC Ron Duckworth says: Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Featured Jobs & Calls March 19, 2012 at 6:14 pm I appreciate your advocacy for sustainable living and the congregations involved in many of the great projects you describe. I think all of the great activities are beneficial for reasons other than climate change. There is every reason for us to be good stewards of our congregations’ resources by saving energy and reducing costs while providing the best facilities and opportunities available. Saving money on utility bills leaves opportunity for investing in great projects like water wells in Malawi with our Anglican brothers.However, I find myself in disagreement over the “climate change” statements. I fear that the credibility of the Episcopal Church is hanging on the highly politicized and shaky science of climate change. There is little doubt that climate and many man caused events are causing havoc and creating poverty. A great need and opportunity exists for us to reach out to others as Christ taught us. But a lot of fact-checking is necessary before we can state the specific achievements you have listed.Regards,Ron Duckworth Rector Knoxville, TN Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Belleville, IL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Collierville, TN Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Submit a Job Listinglast_img read more

NECW: A tribute to a friend

first_img Rector Belleville, IL Sue Hookom says: Rector Martinsville, VA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN General Convention 2012 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Collierville, TN Posted Jul 7, 2012 Submit an Event Listing AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis July 8, 2012 at 8:49 pm There is not a tribute too large for Mary Ellen Smith…..I too wished I could have be there …..thank you for organizing this wonderful tribute to an amazing person….. Submit a Job Listing Comments are closed. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rev’d Dr Susanna Metz says: Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest July 8, 2012 at 8:42 am what a wonderful tribute! Sorry I’m not there to join in, too, but prayers will be coming over for all from England! Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Mary Rosendahl says: Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Smithfield, NC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Tags Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York NECW: A tribute to a friend Featured Events Rector Hopkinsville, KY Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Comments (3) Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Tampa, FL Featured Jobs & Calls Youth Minister Lorton, VA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID General Convention, Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Curate Diocese of Nebraska Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Associate Rector Columbus, GA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA [Triennial Today] The loss of a friend or loved one can create a void in the heart that is difficult to fill. So it was for Catherine Lillibridge, when she lost her friend Mary Ellen Smith, 56, wife of the Rt. Rev. Dabney Smith, bishop of Southwest Florida, to cancer in March of this year.Saddened by the loss of her friend, Lillibridge, who is also married to a bishop (the Rt. Rev. Gary R. Lillibridge, bishop of West Texas), wanted to do something to honor Smith’s memory, but wasn’t certain about how she should go about it. Then, Lillibridge learned that about the first ECW Triennial 5K Walk/Run, scheduled for July 8 at 6:30 a.m.Since both she and Smith were runners and fitness enthusiasts, she decided that she would run in the event to honor her friend. However, after going online to register, Lillibridge was impressed by the beauty of the Indianapolis Canal Walk, where the walk/run is scheduled to take place. It was suddenly clear that she wanted to do something even more special and life affirming to remember Smith.“Mary Ellen and I would walk together each time we went to a House of Bishops or Sewanee gathering. When I saw a picture of the canal and path in Indianapolis that we will walk/run for the 5K, I knew I would be doing this with Mary Ellen in my heart,” said Lillibridge. “It looked like the kind of place where Mary Ellen and I would have liked to walk together.”It was then that she decided to pick up the phone and call the event organizers to discuss just how to pay tribute to her friend at the event, she said.There was an emotional discussion of sponsorship and tribute possibilities. Afterward, it was decided that 5K participants could walk (or run) the event in Mary Ellen Smith’s memory, and that purple armbands bearing Smith’s name (purple being the official representative color of the bishops) would be made available to friends, colleagues, and others walking in her honor.“I contacted Bishop Smith, to make sure he was comfortable with a tribute to Mary Ellen,” Lillibridge remembers. “He was thrilled! In fact, he asked if he should sign up for the race.”Of course, Lillibridge’s response was a resounding “Yes!”With the bishop’s blessing, plans for the tribute fell into place. Lillibridge composed an e-mail to all the bishops, and their spouses, encouraging them to walk in Smith’s memory. She even included a link to the ECW 5K Walk/Run registration site.For those who sign up for the event through that link, and notify Lillibridge, an armband ready for them to wear during the race. The handcrafted armbands are made of purple cloth—donated by yet another clergy spouse—and fabric glue. Each armband bears the words “In Loving Memory of Mary Ellen Smith.”Lillibridge anticipates that a number of convention attendees from the bishops’ community will respond to the 5K tribute for Mary Ellen Smith; she also hopes that convention delegates from Southwest Florida will sign up in for the event in support of their bishop, and the memory of his wife of 36 years.As recently as July 4, Lillibridge’s reported that–although her original plan was to make between 60 to 100 armbands, but the requests for them keeps increasing.One thing is for certain, Lillibridge looks forward to seeing the flashes of purple among the participants — an homage to her friend’s strength, courage, friendship, and unwavering fortitude. Rector Shreveport, LA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Press Release Service Rector Bath, NC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel July 8, 2012 at 7:42 pm What a wonderful, wonderful tribute to Mary Ellen. Wish I could be there. Bless you all. Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJlast_img read more

Houston cathedral mentors make a difference at local school

first_img TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Tags Rector Pittsburgh, PA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Washington, DC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit an Event Listing Houston cathedral mentors make a difference at local school Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET [Episcopal Diocese of Texas] Jen Moss and 6-year-old Mia meet every Tuesday for an hour through a program called Kids Hope USA, which matches students with mentors. Together, they read, play games and talk.An hour a week seems like a small amount of time, but for Mia, it has made a big difference.Jen Moss, a member of Christ Church Cathedral in Houston, spends an hour each week mentoring 6-year-old Mia through a national mentoring program called Kids Hope USA. Photo/Luke BlountKids Hope is a national mentoring program that partners churches with local public schools. Eighteen volunteers from Christ Church Cathedral, Houston, currently mentor students at the Rusk School, a magnet elementary school just east of downtown.“The Rusk School serves the poorest of the poor,” said Susan Jackson, program director. “Kids Hope matches at-risk kids with mentors. These relationships often have a profound effect on the kids’ in-class behavior and have been statistically proven to change the trajectory of the kids’ test scores.”“Mia is quite bright,” said Moss, a cathedral member for around 18 months. “She is in kindergarten, and she is probably reading at a third-grade level. But she is not well-behaved in the classroom … She has hit her teacher, and she throws temper tantrums.”But since beginning the mentoring program, Mia has done better. Since she started receiving the extra attention and moments of guidance, her teachers and parents have reported better behavior.“It’s not that I have a curriculum on behavior improvement,” Moss said. “It’s just spending one-on-one time with her.”And Mia looks forward to that hour every week.“She asks me when I leave if I will be here next Tuesday. She is very concerned that I am always going to come,” Moss said.On a recent visit, Mia was confronted with the idea of Moss not coming on Tuesdays. “I would just be sad,” she said. “We made a deal that even when I’m in first and second and third grade, she can still come and see me on Tuesdays”The 6-year-old then gave Moss a special fist bump to seal the deal before reading the next chapter in their book together.On first glance, one wouldn’t guess that Mia had any troubles at school or elsewhere. A polite, talkative and intelligent girl, Mia already has plans to attend college and become a teacher.“At first I wanted to be a veterinarian,” she said. “But then they said I had to take care of snakes, and I just didn’t want to do it. I hate snakes! Now I want to be a teacher because I can tell the kids what to do and give them homework. I want to try to teach kindergarten or first grade.”Mia’s home life is still a bit of a mystery, Moss said, and she is not sure which stories are real or embellished. But Moss understands the constraints of poverty. Although this is her first time mentoring a child, Moss spent two years as a Teach for America corps member, working with lower-income second-graders.She then went to law school, practiced law, got married and had children. Now that her youngest child has entered pre-kindergarten, she is looking at what to do next.“For me it is a way to start giving back again,” Moss said. “I like the idea of starting with her as a youngster so I can see the progression.”If Mia has her way, Moss will see the progress for years to come.This article first appeared in Christ Church Cathedral’s The Bulletin. An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME By Luke BlountPosted Mar 8, 2013 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Comments are closed. Featured Jobs & Calls An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Rector Columbus, GA Children Curate Diocese of Nebraska Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Knoxville, TN Wilmot T. Merchant, II says: The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI center_img Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Tampa, FL Youth Minister Lorton, VA March 8, 2013 at 11:00 pm I am delighted to read this story, because St. Stephen’s was the first church in South Carolina to start this program; we are now in our third year and we are mentoring 40 students this year. Checkout our website to see what we have done so far. Praise be to God, Episcopal churhes making a difference for the Kingdom of God. Comments (1) Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Submit a Job Listing Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Martinsville, VA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Belleville, IL Submit a Press Release Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Albany, NY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Events Rector Collierville, TN Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Press Release Service Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Shreveport, LAlast_img read more

Day of Prayer is emotional experience for Sudanese congregation

first_img Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Collierville, TN Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Knoxville, TN Africa, An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Members of St. John the Divine Episcopal Church, Moorhead, Minnesota (Diocese of North Dakota) gather with their new vicar, the Rev. Michael Paul, following the worship service on the Day of Prayer for South Sudan on Feb. 16. Photo: Joe Bjordal/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service] The observance of a Day of Prayer for South Sudan on Feb. 16 took on a very personal nature at St. John the Divine Episcopal Church in Moorhead, Minnesota. The congregation is predominantly made up of Sudanese refugees and their prayers were not just for peace in the war-torn country half a world away, but specifically for mothers, fathers, sisters and brothers — family members left behind.Many wiped away tears as their vicar, the Rev. Michael Kiju Paul, himself a Sudanese refugee, prayed “Father, save South Sudan!”Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori called for the Day of Prayer saying “the world is increasingly concerned over the rampant violence in South Sudan.” The Day of Prayer was also observed in the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) and in the Reformed Church in America.The Rev. Michael Kiju Paul, new vicar of St. John the Divine Episcopal Church, Moorhead, Minnesota (Diocese of North Dakota), leads the congregation in prayer for South Sudan before celebrating Holy Communion on Feb. 16. Photo: Joe Bjordal/Episcopal News Service“I want to thank the presiding bishop for designating this day as a Day of Prayer for South Sudan. It means a lot to me and it means a lot to the Sudanese people here,” said Paul in an interview with ENS following the worship service. “We are badly hit and affected by what is happening back home. We weep for our country and the Americans here in our midst weep with us. The hearts of the members of this congregation are torn apart by what is happening back there.”Massive loss of life and displacementA 2011 referendum resulted in the division of the African country of Sudan into two nations —Sudan and South Sudan. The referendum was one of the conditions of a Comprehensive Peace Agreement signed in 2005 that brought an end to civil wars that spanned more than five decades. But peace has been fragile. Last year a division in the government of the Republic of South Sudan brought about the ousting of the vice president and fueled rising unrest within the army. On Dec. 15, fighting broke out in the capital city of Juba between rival tribal factions of the Presidential Guard. Within days thousands of members of the Nuer tribe had been murdered in Juba and the unrest spread to other regions of the country and took on an ethnic dimension.The International Crisis Group estimates that more than 10,000 people have been killed since mid-December. The United Nations, which has observers on the ground in South Sudan, reports that hundreds of thousands have been displaced by the fighting and that 80,000 South Sudanese have crossed the borders in search of safety into neighboring Uganda, Kenya, Ethiopia, and Sudan. U.N. observers also report that nearly two-thirds of the country’s population is at risk of food insecurity.On Feb. 10, the Anglican Communion News Service published a report from World Watch Monitor saying that scores of female church workers were raped and massacred in the South Sudanese town of Bor. The report quotes Episcopal Bishop of Bor Ruben Akurdit Ngong, who said that women had sought shelter in a church compound and that most of the churches in the diocese had been destroyed by rebel soldiers.In her call to prayer, Jefferts Schori noted that the Episcopal Church of Sudan and South Sudan “is partnering with others on the ground in that work of peace-building.” Speaking in Moorhead following the prayer service, Paul said the church in Sudan “has been in the forefront, mediating and talking and attempting to bring the warring parties together to discuss peace.” He said that the church was also “fully involved in the war that brought us independence and has never left its people.”“Right now, in the bushes of South Sudan, in the cities and towns, the church is standing up and really trying to bring these people together to bring peace and allow people to begin to rebuild that country that has been ravaged by war for over 50 years,” said Paul.On Feb. 10, the South Sudan Council of Churches issued a statement from Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, the site of peace talks, saying that church representatives, including Sudanese Episcopal Bishop Enoch Tombe, were on hand to “accompany the peace talks with prayers and to deliver a prophetic message of peace from God and the people of South Sudan … ‘We want peace in our beloved land. We are tired of war!’”Deacon Zechariah Reng and Daniel Mabiroh Suhiuk pray before leading the weekly worship service in the Sudanese dialect of Dinka at St. John the Divine, Moorhead, Minnesota on Feb. 16. Photo: Joe Bjordal/Episcopal News ServiceRemembering; praying; hopingEmotions ran deep at St. John the Divine on Feb. 16 as prayers and memories focused on a homeland far away and left behind long ago – for some nearly 20 years.Vestry member Helen Lodu was among the first Sudanese refugees to settle in the metropolitan area of twin cities Fargo, North Dakota and Moorhead, Minnesota in 1995. She said “the war was just so bad we had to get the children out of the country.” They lived in Kenya for two years before they found an opportunity to go to the United States and join her brother, who had previously settled in Northern Minnesota.Lodu, whose husband recently returned from Sudan and witnessed the current violence first-hand, said it was sad to have been at war for so long, to have fought to gain independence and yet be back at “square one.”She was nonetheless buoyed by the Day of Prayer.“This day means a lot to me because I have never been able to go back to Sudan and see my people. I pray that God will listen to the prayers of all who unite themselves; that one day peace will come; that those who suffer can enjoy the land that God has given them; and we can go back.”Another vestry member, Albert Simbe, fled Sudan with his late wife in 1998 and settled in Fargo-Moorhead. He said he has recently received reports from relatives in South Sudan about the violence that has erupted since Dec. 15.“I really feel grateful that people in the United States are thinking about the suffering people in South Sudan. What broke out there on Dec. 15 is terrible, with thousands of people killed, displaced and suffering with no food, no water, no essential commodities. I am praying very hard that the peace talks in Addis Ababa will succeed. If they do not, as one rebel leader said, the country will crumble,” said Simbe.“I am praying that Almighty God will be among them in the peace talks, so that they will agree and the country can be at peace,” he said.Hospitality brings a change of characterLodu and Simbe are but two of nearly 3,000 Sudanese refugees who have settled in the Fargo-Moorhead area. The influx started in the mid-1990s and gained momentum around 2000 when dozens of the Lost Boys of Sudan began to arrive. They were refugees who fled war-torn Sudan without parents, often alone and seeking asylum initially in neighboring countries to avoid being drafted into war. Many would eventually settle in locations around the world.Many of the arriving Sudanese refugees were members of the Episcopal Church of Sudan and Episcopal faith communities in the United States rose up and stepped forward to provide assistance. One of those communities was St. John the Divine in Moorhead, a congregation of the Episcopal Diocese of North Dakota.Barbara Glasrud, a 60-year member of St. John’s and its current senior warden, said on Feb. 16 that she remembers “vividly how it all started,” recalling a visit in the late 1990s from Andrew Fairfield, then bishop of North Dakota.“He told us that these people were coming into our area; that they were Episcopalians and Anglicans; that they needed a church home; and that he would like us to welcome them. We did and the rest is history,” she said.Glasrud said that in the beginning it was just a few of the Lost Boys. She recalls members of the congregation meeting them at the airport; helping to find housing, and for many basic clothing needed for a climate in sharp contrast to the deserts of Africa. Then, she said, families started coming and “soon we had a big population of Sudanese people in our congregation.”Having changed the character of the Anglo congregation with Scandinavian roots that had worshiped in the historic church building since 1858, St. John’s called its first Sudanese priest in 2000. It was Lodu’s husband, Alex, who was ordained in the Episcopal Church of Sudan and was serving as a professor at a theological college in Mundri at the time of their departure. He served St. John’s for 10 years.Paul arrived in mid-2013. He was ordained a priest in the Diocese of Kajo Keji in South Sudan and after settling in the United States served St. Luke’s Episcopal Church in San Diego, California for six years. When financial resources no longer allowed St. Luke’s to have a full-time priest, Paul sought employment outside the church.Aware that there was a Sudanese congregation in the Fargo-Moorhead area, he found work in window and door manufacturing. He asked his bishop in San Diego to introduce him to North Dakota Bishop Michael Smith, who eventually asked Paul to volunteer at St. John’s.“Father Michael seemed to fit right in,” said Glasrud, and in December the congregation called Paul to be its vicar, a part-time position for the timebeing.Paul notes that without a Sudanese pastor, participation in the congregation’s three Sunday worship services – in English, Dinka and Arabic – had dwindled but have now started to revive.“As the new vicar, I am working day in and day out, calling the Sudanese community to come back. There is a large Sudanese community here and there is no reason why we cannot gather as brothers and sisters to worship together.”He also said that members of the congregation will launch new efforts to educate the community and other congregations in the diocese about the issues surrounding South Sudan and invite them “to pray for our country.”Paul will formally be installed by Smith at a Celebration of New Ministry on Feb. 22. Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Belleville, IL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Sudan & South Sudan Curate Diocese of Nebraska This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Tags Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Tampa, FL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit a Job Listing An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Featured Events Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Press Release Service Youth Minister Lorton, VA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Bath, NC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit an Event Listing Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Washington, DC Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Albany, NY Rector Smithfield, NC Day of Prayer is emotional experience for Sudanese congregation Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Director of Music Morristown, NJ By Joe BjordalPosted Feb 19, 2014 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 last_img read more

Meditaciones de Cuaresma del 75 Aniversario de la Agencia Episcopal…

first_img Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Washington, DC Rector Collierville, TN Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Shreveport, LA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Albany, NY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC NUEVA YORK – La edición del 75 Aniversario de las Meditaciones de Cuaresma de la Agencia Episcopal de Alivio y Desarrollo se encuentra ahora disponible en Inglés y Español para la temporada de Cuaresma de 2015.Las meditaciones de este año, preparadas por un grupo diverso de líderes de la Iglesia Episcopal y la Comunión Anglicana, se centran alrededor de las cinco afirmaciones “Yo creo”, las cuales son el núcleo del trabajo realizado en el 75 Aniversario de la Agencia Episcopal de Alivio y Desarrollo:Yo creo que todas las personas deben tener acceso a agua limpia.Yo creo que ninguna persona debería padecer de hambre.Yo creo que todos los niños y las familias merecen un inicio saludable en la vida.Yo creo que ninguna persona debería vivir en pobreza.Yo creo que juntos podemos sanar a un mundo que sufre.“Estas cinco afirmaciones encabezadas por las palabras ‘Yo creo’ reúnen nuestro compromiso para con las personas que viven en situación de pobreza y sin las básicas necesarias para vivir” afirma Sean McConnell, Director de Participación. “A lo largo de los últimos 75 años, la Agencia Episcopal de Alivio y Desarrollo ha trabajado con sus socios para contrarrestar la escasez y el desbalance, primero a través de la entrega de ayuda urgente a los refugiados y luego también a través de programas de desarrollo de largo plazo. La Cuaresma nos da la oportunidad de reflexionar sobre el llamado que hace Jesús en Mateo 25 de atender a los que tienen necesidad y de redoblar nuestro esfuerzo por vivir con actitud compasiva y por elevar la dignidad de cada uno de los seres humanos”.En conmemoración de los 75 años de trabajo conjunto por sanar a un mundo que sufre, las congregaciones de toda La Iglesia Episcopal se darán la mano el 22 de febrero, el primer domingo de Cuaresma, día en que celebraremos el Domingo Episcopal de Alivio y Desarrollo. En esta fecha, se invita a los Episcopales a orar por las personas que viven en la pobreza y a dedicar una ofrenda especial para ayudar a los que más lo necesitan, a través del Fondo del 75 Aniversario.Las congregaciones que participen en el Domingo Episcopal de Alivio y Desarrollo tendrán disponible un folleto especial para insertar en su boletín dominical.“Me siento profundamente agradecido por las tantas personas y congregaciones que mantienen en sus oraciones a lo largo del año a la Agencia Episcopal de Alivio y Desarrollo y sus socios”, dijo Rob Radtke, el presidente de la organización. “Este aniversario 75 es una oportunidad especial en que los episcopales podemos enfocar nuestras prácticas espirituales de Cuaresma en esfuerzos que alivien la pobreza, el hambre y la enfermedad, a través de sus meditaciones diarias y del Domingo Episcopal de Alivio y Desarrollo”.Los folletos en PDF y otros recursos materiales para la cuaresma aparecen publicados en la página web de la Agencia Episcopal de Alivio y Desarrollo en episcopalrelief.org/cuaresma. Las personas que deseen recibir devocionales diarios por correo electrónico pueden inscribirse en dicha página.Los folletos impresos deben solicitarse antes del 4 de febrero para poder recibirlos antes del 18 de febrero, Miércoles de Ceniza, y pueden pedirse en línea desde Marketplace Episcopal o llamando al1.866.937.2772.La Cuaresma fue designada en la Convención General de 2009 como un momento para animar a las diócesis, congregaciones y personas a recordar y apoyar el vital trabajo que realiza la Agencia Episcopal de Alivio y Desarrollo. Aunque el primer domingo de Cuaresma es el día oficial, las congregaciones pueden observar la celebración Episcopal de Alivio y Desarrollo durante cualquier domingo de la temporada de Cuaresma.“Los Cristianos aprovechan esta temporada para considerar cómo sus vidas reflejan las enseñanzas de compasión, justicia y entrega sacrificada de Jesús”, comenta McConnell. “La Agencia Episcopal de Alivio y Desarrollo ayuda a los episcopales a poner en práctica esos valores al conectarlos con las necesidades globales y al crear oportunidades para participar de forma más profunda en problemas que nos impactan a todos. Nos sentimos agradecidos y orgullosos de trabajar juntos por un futuro brillante de las comunidades en todo el mundo.” Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Knoxville, TN Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Course Director Jerusalem, Israel The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Meditaciones de Cuaresma del 75 Aniversario de la Agencia Episcopal de Alivio y Desarrollo TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit a Job Listing An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Bath, NC Submit an Event Listing Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Press Release Press Release Service Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Posted Jan 12, 2015 Featured Events Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Rector Columbus, GA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Tampa, FL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Youth Minister Lorton, VA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Featured Jobs & Calls Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Belleville, IL Rector Smithfield, NC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Pittsburgh, PAlast_img read more

Georgia activists ask for end to executions of intellectually disabled

first_img Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Hopkinsville, KY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit an Event Listing In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Belleville, IL Rector Bath, NC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Shreveport, LA Featured Events Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET [Episcopal Diocese of Atlanta] Death penalty opponents this week asked lawmakers to bring Georgia into line with all other states for how the state determines whether death row inmates are intellectually disabled.When the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in 2002 that it is unconstitutional to execute people with intellectual disabilities Georgia was first to establish new rules. But, Georgia is now the only state to require the beyond a reasonable doubt standard, meaning that there be no doubt that an inmate is intellectually disabled. Of the states still executing prisoners, 24 require a preponderance of evidence and four use the clear and convincing standard, both less stringent levels of proof.The Rev. Joseph Shippen of Christ Church, Macon, who is also a death row chaplain, represents Bishop Robert C. Wright at a press conference following meetings with legislators. Photo: Diocese of AtlantaThe Rev. Joseph Shippen of Christ Church, Macon, who represented Bishop Robert C. Wright at a press conference following the meetings with legislators, said that The Episcopal Church has since 1954 been on record opposing the death penalty.“We cannot stand by and support our State treating human beings, God’s beloved children, as disposable objects,” Shippen said. Of particular concern, he said, is the increasing pace of executions.“In 2015 alone, two men have already been executed, and as I speak Kelly Gissendaner is scheduled to be put to death on Feb. 25,” he said.Gissendaner, convicted in 1998 of having her boyfriend kill her husband, would be the first woman executed in Georgia since 1945 when Lena Baker was electrocuted for killing her employer. Baker received a full pardon in 2005, when the Georgia Board of Pardons and Paroles agreed with her family’s argument that Baker acted in self-defense and should have been charged with manslaughter.The first man put to death in 2015, Andrew Brannon, was a decorated Vietnam veteran who committed his crime as a result of his PTSD that he acquired in wartime, Shippen said. “What does it say about the way we treat veterans in our state when we execute those who struggle with the disabilities acquired as a result of heroic service on our behalf?”The second man put to death in Georgia this year, Warren Hill, had an IQ of 70. “He was clearly intellectually disabled, and that should have disqualified him from the death penalty,” Shippen said. “He was unable to prove his intellectual disability, though, because Georgia is alone in our country in requiring that a condemned person must prove his intellectual disability beyond a reasonable doubt, a standard that is almost impossible to meet.”Sara Totonchi, who heads the Southern Center for Human Rights, told an audience of about 30 gathered in the Capitol Rotunda,that despite the quickening pace of executions in Georgia there is reason for hope that the death penalty is nearing an end in the United States.“Twenty years ago, the notion that the United States might abandon capital punishment was inconceivable,” Totonchi said. “In the past 10 years, however, we have witnessed a seismic shift in the opposite direction” with six states abandoning executing prisoners in the past six year.She said that despite Georgia’s “thirst for vengeance and our politicians’ tough-on-crime mantras, the tide is turning here as well.” Last year, Totonchi said, there were 35 executions in just seven states, the fewest number is 20 years.Shippen and Totonchi were joined at the press conference by representatives of the anti-death penalty group Georgians for Alternatives to the Death Penalty GFADP), the Georgia Council for Developmental Disabilities and longtime death penalty opponent Sen. Vincent Fort of Atlanta.GFADP Chair Kathryn Hamoudah said, “Georgia’s legal system is once more bringing shame and embarrassment to our state by failing to protect those who are most vulnerable.“We continue to set the bar for the most inhumane and unjust practices,” Hamoudah said. “Without intervention by the Georgia General Assembly, Georgia will undoubtedly continue to execute people with intellectual disabilities.”Currently, no bills have been filed addressing the level of proof for establishing intellectual disability for death row inmates.An article on the lobby day by death-penalty opponents appeared in the Feb. 11 issue of the Athens Banner-Herald— Don Plummer is communications coordinator for community and media relations for the Diocese of Atlanta. Rector Tampa, FL Press Release Service Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Georgia activists ask for end to executions of intellectually disabled Diocese of Atlanta joins other death-penalty opponents lobbying legislators Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. 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