‘Sacred Acts’ translates climate change intentions into religious action

first_img‘Sacred Acts’ translates climate change intentions into religious action Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Youth Minister Lorton, VA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Advocacy Peace & Justice, Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Environment & Climate Change Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR [Episcopal News Service] Although global warming has become politicized in Congress, there is one public arena with more agreement than discord on the need to address climate change: that’s among our religious leadership in the Episcopal Church.Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Shori, has testified before the Senate environment committee on the connection between global poverty and climate change. The Genesis Covenant challenges all church facilities in the Episcopal Church to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions by 50 percent within 10 years.While many lay and ordained leaders acknowledge the scientific consensus that human actions have caused the planet’s warming, it’s harder to translate that knowledge into action at a congregational level.As a lifelong Episcopalian, I traveled across the country with my two children to document how churches were integrating the environment into their ministries: the result was a book called Natural Saints. My research revealed a need for stories about how congregations were confronting climate change, the greatest moral crisis of our time.To that end, Sacred Acts: How Churches are Working to Protect Earth’s Climate includes the writings of national leaders such as Bill McKibben, the Rev. Sally Bingham, founder and director of Interfaith Power & Light, and Katharine Hayhoe, climate scientist and evangelical.But the focus of this anthology is on voices from local congregations that are harvesting food from church gardens, weatherizing parish halls, installing solar panels on sanctuaries, and advocating against mountaintop removal. Georgia Interfaith Power & Light, for example, has completed 76 energy audits of religious facilities, saving congregations 20 percent of their energy budgets: 200 more congregations are in the pipeline.While the book is ecumenical in scope, many of the contributors have ties to the Episcopal Church. Ragan Sutterfield writes about faith and food at places like Christ Church in Little Rock, Arkansas, where the kitchen becomes a biweekly pick-up point for an online farmers market, which reduces carbon emissions and promotes local economies.Sacred Acts is organized around four avenues for addressing climate change – stewardship, spirituality, advocacy, and justice – with three chapters in each section.Writing about stewardship, the Rev. Fletcher Harper, an Episcopal priest and executive director of GreenFaith, describes his work with congregations on projects such as installing solar panels at the United Methodist Church in Red Bank, New Jersey, which now generate 30 percent of the congregation’s energy or conducting an energy audit at Shiloh Baptist Church in Trenton, New Jersey, with $7,000 in annual savings.The Rev. Brian Cole, at Church of the Good Shepherd in Lexington, Kentucky, tackles spirituality and climate change, addressing the challenge of preaching when the climate is warming. Through advocacy, Michele McGeoy, the executive director of Solar Richmond, has partnered with congregations in California in a green-jobs training program that prepares youth to work in the solar industry. Parishes such as St. John’s Episcopal Church in Oakland, California, hired a graduate of Solar Richmond’s program to help install solar panels on its church, thus lowering its carbon footprint, and promoting economic justice.Jill Rios, worshipped at La Capilla de Santa Maria in Hendersonville, North Carolina, for five years with her husband the Rev. Austin Rios. In her role with North Carolina Interfaith Power & Light, Jill focused on climate justice, working with parishioners on sustainable building projects at the church, which ministers to Spanish-speaking immigrants from Latin America. She examines the connections between faith and justice, given the growing number of climate refugees forced to leave their homes due to climate change.Some skeptics might protest that churches are unprepared to confront global warming when memberships and budgets are shrinking. Others might say people of faith lack the capacity to act with consensus around a politically divisive issue.But history tells me that Christians have mobilized around moral and political issues such as the anti-slavery and civil rights movement. And as editor of this book, I realized how climate change has brought together diverse religious denominations, from evangelicals to Episcopalians, who often disagree about issues such as abortion or same-sex marriage.The voices in Sacred Acts reveal that we must reinvigorate churches through climate action that reflects loving our neighbor as ourselves. Our liturgy prepares us for sacred acts of resistance that can reconcile us with the earth, each other, and ultimately with God. And that’s the kind of Episcopal Church I want for my children.— Mallory McDuff teaches at Warren Wilson College and is the author of two books about faith and the environment: “Natural Saints” and “Sacred Acts.” She worships at The Cathedral of All Souls in Asheville, North Carolina. Featured Events Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Rector Columbus, GA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Press Release Service Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit an Event Listing Rector Albany, NY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET By Mallory McDuffPosted Mar 16, 2012 Submit a Press Release This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Martinsville, VA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Comments are closed. Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Tampa, FL Tags Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Bath, NC Comments (1) Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Pittsburgh, PA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Washington, DC Ron Duckworth says: Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Featured Jobs & Calls March 19, 2012 at 6:14 pm I appreciate your advocacy for sustainable living and the congregations involved in many of the great projects you describe. I think all of the great activities are beneficial for reasons other than climate change. There is every reason for us to be good stewards of our congregations’ resources by saving energy and reducing costs while providing the best facilities and opportunities available. Saving money on utility bills leaves opportunity for investing in great projects like water wells in Malawi with our Anglican brothers.However, I find myself in disagreement over the “climate change” statements. I fear that the credibility of the Episcopal Church is hanging on the highly politicized and shaky science of climate change. There is little doubt that climate and many man caused events are causing havoc and creating poverty. A great need and opportunity exists for us to reach out to others as Christ taught us. But a lot of fact-checking is necessary before we can state the specific achievements you have listed.Regards,Ron Duckworth Rector Knoxville, TN Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Belleville, IL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Collierville, TN Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Submit a Job Listinglast_img read more

NECW: A tribute to a friend

first_img Rector Belleville, IL Sue Hookom says: Rector Martinsville, VA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN General Convention 2012 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Collierville, TN Posted Jul 7, 2012 Submit an Event Listing AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis July 8, 2012 at 8:49 pm There is not a tribute too large for Mary Ellen Smith…..I too wished I could have be there …..thank you for organizing this wonderful tribute to an amazing person….. Submit a Job Listing Comments are closed. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rev’d Dr Susanna Metz says: Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest July 8, 2012 at 8:42 am what a wonderful tribute! Sorry I’m not there to join in, too, but prayers will be coming over for all from England! Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Mary Rosendahl says: Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Smithfield, NC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Tags Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York NECW: A tribute to a friend Featured Events Rector Hopkinsville, KY Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Comments (3) Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Tampa, FL Featured Jobs & Calls Youth Minister Lorton, VA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID General Convention, Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Curate Diocese of Nebraska Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Associate Rector Columbus, GA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA [Triennial Today] The loss of a friend or loved one can create a void in the heart that is difficult to fill. So it was for Catherine Lillibridge, when she lost her friend Mary Ellen Smith, 56, wife of the Rt. Rev. Dabney Smith, bishop of Southwest Florida, to cancer in March of this year.Saddened by the loss of her friend, Lillibridge, who is also married to a bishop (the Rt. Rev. Gary R. Lillibridge, bishop of West Texas), wanted to do something to honor Smith’s memory, but wasn’t certain about how she should go about it. Then, Lillibridge learned that about the first ECW Triennial 5K Walk/Run, scheduled for July 8 at 6:30 a.m.Since both she and Smith were runners and fitness enthusiasts, she decided that she would run in the event to honor her friend. However, after going online to register, Lillibridge was impressed by the beauty of the Indianapolis Canal Walk, where the walk/run is scheduled to take place. It was suddenly clear that she wanted to do something even more special and life affirming to remember Smith.“Mary Ellen and I would walk together each time we went to a House of Bishops or Sewanee gathering. When I saw a picture of the canal and path in Indianapolis that we will walk/run for the 5K, I knew I would be doing this with Mary Ellen in my heart,” said Lillibridge. “It looked like the kind of place where Mary Ellen and I would have liked to walk together.”It was then that she decided to pick up the phone and call the event organizers to discuss just how to pay tribute to her friend at the event, she said.There was an emotional discussion of sponsorship and tribute possibilities. Afterward, it was decided that 5K participants could walk (or run) the event in Mary Ellen Smith’s memory, and that purple armbands bearing Smith’s name (purple being the official representative color of the bishops) would be made available to friends, colleagues, and others walking in her honor.“I contacted Bishop Smith, to make sure he was comfortable with a tribute to Mary Ellen,” Lillibridge remembers. “He was thrilled! In fact, he asked if he should sign up for the race.”Of course, Lillibridge’s response was a resounding “Yes!”With the bishop’s blessing, plans for the tribute fell into place. Lillibridge composed an e-mail to all the bishops, and their spouses, encouraging them to walk in Smith’s memory. She even included a link to the ECW 5K Walk/Run registration site.For those who sign up for the event through that link, and notify Lillibridge, an armband ready for them to wear during the race. The handcrafted armbands are made of purple cloth—donated by yet another clergy spouse—and fabric glue. Each armband bears the words “In Loving Memory of Mary Ellen Smith.”Lillibridge anticipates that a number of convention attendees from the bishops’ community will respond to the 5K tribute for Mary Ellen Smith; she also hopes that convention delegates from Southwest Florida will sign up in for the event in support of their bishop, and the memory of his wife of 36 years.As recently as July 4, Lillibridge’s reported that–although her original plan was to make between 60 to 100 armbands, but the requests for them keeps increasing.One thing is for certain, Lillibridge looks forward to seeing the flashes of purple among the participants — an homage to her friend’s strength, courage, friendship, and unwavering fortitude. Rector Shreveport, LA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Press Release Service Rector Bath, NC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel July 8, 2012 at 7:42 pm What a wonderful, wonderful tribute to Mary Ellen. Wish I could be there. Bless you all. Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJlast_img read more

Houston cathedral mentors make a difference at local school

first_img TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Tags Rector Pittsburgh, PA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Washington, DC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit an Event Listing Houston cathedral mentors make a difference at local school Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET [Episcopal Diocese of Texas] Jen Moss and 6-year-old Mia meet every Tuesday for an hour through a program called Kids Hope USA, which matches students with mentors. Together, they read, play games and talk.An hour a week seems like a small amount of time, but for Mia, it has made a big difference.Jen Moss, a member of Christ Church Cathedral in Houston, spends an hour each week mentoring 6-year-old Mia through a national mentoring program called Kids Hope USA. Photo/Luke BlountKids Hope is a national mentoring program that partners churches with local public schools. Eighteen volunteers from Christ Church Cathedral, Houston, currently mentor students at the Rusk School, a magnet elementary school just east of downtown.“The Rusk School serves the poorest of the poor,” said Susan Jackson, program director. “Kids Hope matches at-risk kids with mentors. These relationships often have a profound effect on the kids’ in-class behavior and have been statistically proven to change the trajectory of the kids’ test scores.”“Mia is quite bright,” said Moss, a cathedral member for around 18 months. “She is in kindergarten, and she is probably reading at a third-grade level. But she is not well-behaved in the classroom … She has hit her teacher, and she throws temper tantrums.”But since beginning the mentoring program, Mia has done better. Since she started receiving the extra attention and moments of guidance, her teachers and parents have reported better behavior.“It’s not that I have a curriculum on behavior improvement,” Moss said. “It’s just spending one-on-one time with her.”And Mia looks forward to that hour every week.“She asks me when I leave if I will be here next Tuesday. She is very concerned that I am always going to come,” Moss said.On a recent visit, Mia was confronted with the idea of Moss not coming on Tuesdays. “I would just be sad,” she said. “We made a deal that even when I’m in first and second and third grade, she can still come and see me on Tuesdays”The 6-year-old then gave Moss a special fist bump to seal the deal before reading the next chapter in their book together.On first glance, one wouldn’t guess that Mia had any troubles at school or elsewhere. A polite, talkative and intelligent girl, Mia already has plans to attend college and become a teacher.“At first I wanted to be a veterinarian,” she said. “But then they said I had to take care of snakes, and I just didn’t want to do it. I hate snakes! Now I want to be a teacher because I can tell the kids what to do and give them homework. I want to try to teach kindergarten or first grade.”Mia’s home life is still a bit of a mystery, Moss said, and she is not sure which stories are real or embellished. But Moss understands the constraints of poverty. Although this is her first time mentoring a child, Moss spent two years as a Teach for America corps member, working with lower-income second-graders.She then went to law school, practiced law, got married and had children. Now that her youngest child has entered pre-kindergarten, she is looking at what to do next.“For me it is a way to start giving back again,” Moss said. “I like the idea of starting with her as a youngster so I can see the progression.”If Mia has her way, Moss will see the progress for years to come.This article first appeared in Christ Church Cathedral’s The Bulletin. An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME By Luke BlountPosted Mar 8, 2013 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Comments are closed. Featured Jobs & Calls An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Rector Columbus, GA Children Curate Diocese of Nebraska Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Knoxville, TN Wilmot T. Merchant, II says: The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI center_img Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Tampa, FL Youth Minister Lorton, VA March 8, 2013 at 11:00 pm I am delighted to read this story, because St. Stephen’s was the first church in South Carolina to start this program; we are now in our third year and we are mentoring 40 students this year. Checkout our website to see what we have done so far. Praise be to God, Episcopal churhes making a difference for the Kingdom of God. Comments (1) Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Submit a Job Listing Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Martinsville, VA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Belleville, IL Submit a Press Release Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Albany, NY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Events Rector Collierville, TN Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Press Release Service Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Shreveport, LAlast_img read more

Day of Prayer is emotional experience for Sudanese congregation

first_img Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Collierville, TN Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Knoxville, TN Africa, An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Members of St. John the Divine Episcopal Church, Moorhead, Minnesota (Diocese of North Dakota) gather with their new vicar, the Rev. Michael Paul, following the worship service on the Day of Prayer for South Sudan on Feb. 16. Photo: Joe Bjordal/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service] The observance of a Day of Prayer for South Sudan on Feb. 16 took on a very personal nature at St. John the Divine Episcopal Church in Moorhead, Minnesota. The congregation is predominantly made up of Sudanese refugees and their prayers were not just for peace in the war-torn country half a world away, but specifically for mothers, fathers, sisters and brothers — family members left behind.Many wiped away tears as their vicar, the Rev. Michael Kiju Paul, himself a Sudanese refugee, prayed “Father, save South Sudan!”Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori called for the Day of Prayer saying “the world is increasingly concerned over the rampant violence in South Sudan.” The Day of Prayer was also observed in the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) and in the Reformed Church in America.The Rev. Michael Kiju Paul, new vicar of St. John the Divine Episcopal Church, Moorhead, Minnesota (Diocese of North Dakota), leads the congregation in prayer for South Sudan before celebrating Holy Communion on Feb. 16. Photo: Joe Bjordal/Episcopal News Service“I want to thank the presiding bishop for designating this day as a Day of Prayer for South Sudan. It means a lot to me and it means a lot to the Sudanese people here,” said Paul in an interview with ENS following the worship service. “We are badly hit and affected by what is happening back home. We weep for our country and the Americans here in our midst weep with us. The hearts of the members of this congregation are torn apart by what is happening back there.”Massive loss of life and displacementA 2011 referendum resulted in the division of the African country of Sudan into two nations —Sudan and South Sudan. The referendum was one of the conditions of a Comprehensive Peace Agreement signed in 2005 that brought an end to civil wars that spanned more than five decades. But peace has been fragile. Last year a division in the government of the Republic of South Sudan brought about the ousting of the vice president and fueled rising unrest within the army. On Dec. 15, fighting broke out in the capital city of Juba between rival tribal factions of the Presidential Guard. Within days thousands of members of the Nuer tribe had been murdered in Juba and the unrest spread to other regions of the country and took on an ethnic dimension.The International Crisis Group estimates that more than 10,000 people have been killed since mid-December. The United Nations, which has observers on the ground in South Sudan, reports that hundreds of thousands have been displaced by the fighting and that 80,000 South Sudanese have crossed the borders in search of safety into neighboring Uganda, Kenya, Ethiopia, and Sudan. U.N. observers also report that nearly two-thirds of the country’s population is at risk of food insecurity.On Feb. 10, the Anglican Communion News Service published a report from World Watch Monitor saying that scores of female church workers were raped and massacred in the South Sudanese town of Bor. The report quotes Episcopal Bishop of Bor Ruben Akurdit Ngong, who said that women had sought shelter in a church compound and that most of the churches in the diocese had been destroyed by rebel soldiers.In her call to prayer, Jefferts Schori noted that the Episcopal Church of Sudan and South Sudan “is partnering with others on the ground in that work of peace-building.” Speaking in Moorhead following the prayer service, Paul said the church in Sudan “has been in the forefront, mediating and talking and attempting to bring the warring parties together to discuss peace.” He said that the church was also “fully involved in the war that brought us independence and has never left its people.”“Right now, in the bushes of South Sudan, in the cities and towns, the church is standing up and really trying to bring these people together to bring peace and allow people to begin to rebuild that country that has been ravaged by war for over 50 years,” said Paul.On Feb. 10, the South Sudan Council of Churches issued a statement from Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, the site of peace talks, saying that church representatives, including Sudanese Episcopal Bishop Enoch Tombe, were on hand to “accompany the peace talks with prayers and to deliver a prophetic message of peace from God and the people of South Sudan … ‘We want peace in our beloved land. We are tired of war!’”Deacon Zechariah Reng and Daniel Mabiroh Suhiuk pray before leading the weekly worship service in the Sudanese dialect of Dinka at St. John the Divine, Moorhead, Minnesota on Feb. 16. Photo: Joe Bjordal/Episcopal News ServiceRemembering; praying; hopingEmotions ran deep at St. John the Divine on Feb. 16 as prayers and memories focused on a homeland far away and left behind long ago – for some nearly 20 years.Vestry member Helen Lodu was among the first Sudanese refugees to settle in the metropolitan area of twin cities Fargo, North Dakota and Moorhead, Minnesota in 1995. She said “the war was just so bad we had to get the children out of the country.” They lived in Kenya for two years before they found an opportunity to go to the United States and join her brother, who had previously settled in Northern Minnesota.Lodu, whose husband recently returned from Sudan and witnessed the current violence first-hand, said it was sad to have been at war for so long, to have fought to gain independence and yet be back at “square one.”She was nonetheless buoyed by the Day of Prayer.“This day means a lot to me because I have never been able to go back to Sudan and see my people. I pray that God will listen to the prayers of all who unite themselves; that one day peace will come; that those who suffer can enjoy the land that God has given them; and we can go back.”Another vestry member, Albert Simbe, fled Sudan with his late wife in 1998 and settled in Fargo-Moorhead. He said he has recently received reports from relatives in South Sudan about the violence that has erupted since Dec. 15.“I really feel grateful that people in the United States are thinking about the suffering people in South Sudan. What broke out there on Dec. 15 is terrible, with thousands of people killed, displaced and suffering with no food, no water, no essential commodities. I am praying very hard that the peace talks in Addis Ababa will succeed. If they do not, as one rebel leader said, the country will crumble,” said Simbe.“I am praying that Almighty God will be among them in the peace talks, so that they will agree and the country can be at peace,” he said.Hospitality brings a change of characterLodu and Simbe are but two of nearly 3,000 Sudanese refugees who have settled in the Fargo-Moorhead area. The influx started in the mid-1990s and gained momentum around 2000 when dozens of the Lost Boys of Sudan began to arrive. They were refugees who fled war-torn Sudan without parents, often alone and seeking asylum initially in neighboring countries to avoid being drafted into war. Many would eventually settle in locations around the world.Many of the arriving Sudanese refugees were members of the Episcopal Church of Sudan and Episcopal faith communities in the United States rose up and stepped forward to provide assistance. One of those communities was St. John the Divine in Moorhead, a congregation of the Episcopal Diocese of North Dakota.Barbara Glasrud, a 60-year member of St. John’s and its current senior warden, said on Feb. 16 that she remembers “vividly how it all started,” recalling a visit in the late 1990s from Andrew Fairfield, then bishop of North Dakota.“He told us that these people were coming into our area; that they were Episcopalians and Anglicans; that they needed a church home; and that he would like us to welcome them. We did and the rest is history,” she said.Glasrud said that in the beginning it was just a few of the Lost Boys. She recalls members of the congregation meeting them at the airport; helping to find housing, and for many basic clothing needed for a climate in sharp contrast to the deserts of Africa. Then, she said, families started coming and “soon we had a big population of Sudanese people in our congregation.”Having changed the character of the Anglo congregation with Scandinavian roots that had worshiped in the historic church building since 1858, St. John’s called its first Sudanese priest in 2000. It was Lodu’s husband, Alex, who was ordained in the Episcopal Church of Sudan and was serving as a professor at a theological college in Mundri at the time of their departure. He served St. John’s for 10 years.Paul arrived in mid-2013. He was ordained a priest in the Diocese of Kajo Keji in South Sudan and after settling in the United States served St. Luke’s Episcopal Church in San Diego, California for six years. When financial resources no longer allowed St. Luke’s to have a full-time priest, Paul sought employment outside the church.Aware that there was a Sudanese congregation in the Fargo-Moorhead area, he found work in window and door manufacturing. He asked his bishop in San Diego to introduce him to North Dakota Bishop Michael Smith, who eventually asked Paul to volunteer at St. John’s.“Father Michael seemed to fit right in,” said Glasrud, and in December the congregation called Paul to be its vicar, a part-time position for the timebeing.Paul notes that without a Sudanese pastor, participation in the congregation’s three Sunday worship services – in English, Dinka and Arabic – had dwindled but have now started to revive.“As the new vicar, I am working day in and day out, calling the Sudanese community to come back. There is a large Sudanese community here and there is no reason why we cannot gather as brothers and sisters to worship together.”He also said that members of the congregation will launch new efforts to educate the community and other congregations in the diocese about the issues surrounding South Sudan and invite them “to pray for our country.”Paul will formally be installed by Smith at a Celebration of New Ministry on Feb. 22. Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Belleville, IL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Sudan & South Sudan Curate Diocese of Nebraska This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Tags Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Tampa, FL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit a Job Listing An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Featured Events Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Press Release Service Youth Minister Lorton, VA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Bath, NC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit an Event Listing Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Washington, DC Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Albany, NY Rector Smithfield, NC Day of Prayer is emotional experience for Sudanese congregation Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Director of Music Morristown, NJ By Joe BjordalPosted Feb 19, 2014 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 last_img read more

Meditaciones de Cuaresma del 75 Aniversario de la Agencia Episcopal…

first_img Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Washington, DC Rector Collierville, TN Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Shreveport, LA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Albany, NY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC NUEVA YORK – La edición del 75 Aniversario de las Meditaciones de Cuaresma de la Agencia Episcopal de Alivio y Desarrollo se encuentra ahora disponible en Inglés y Español para la temporada de Cuaresma de 2015.Las meditaciones de este año, preparadas por un grupo diverso de líderes de la Iglesia Episcopal y la Comunión Anglicana, se centran alrededor de las cinco afirmaciones “Yo creo”, las cuales son el núcleo del trabajo realizado en el 75 Aniversario de la Agencia Episcopal de Alivio y Desarrollo:Yo creo que todas las personas deben tener acceso a agua limpia.Yo creo que ninguna persona debería padecer de hambre.Yo creo que todos los niños y las familias merecen un inicio saludable en la vida.Yo creo que ninguna persona debería vivir en pobreza.Yo creo que juntos podemos sanar a un mundo que sufre.“Estas cinco afirmaciones encabezadas por las palabras ‘Yo creo’ reúnen nuestro compromiso para con las personas que viven en situación de pobreza y sin las básicas necesarias para vivir” afirma Sean McConnell, Director de Participación. “A lo largo de los últimos 75 años, la Agencia Episcopal de Alivio y Desarrollo ha trabajado con sus socios para contrarrestar la escasez y el desbalance, primero a través de la entrega de ayuda urgente a los refugiados y luego también a través de programas de desarrollo de largo plazo. La Cuaresma nos da la oportunidad de reflexionar sobre el llamado que hace Jesús en Mateo 25 de atender a los que tienen necesidad y de redoblar nuestro esfuerzo por vivir con actitud compasiva y por elevar la dignidad de cada uno de los seres humanos”.En conmemoración de los 75 años de trabajo conjunto por sanar a un mundo que sufre, las congregaciones de toda La Iglesia Episcopal se darán la mano el 22 de febrero, el primer domingo de Cuaresma, día en que celebraremos el Domingo Episcopal de Alivio y Desarrollo. En esta fecha, se invita a los Episcopales a orar por las personas que viven en la pobreza y a dedicar una ofrenda especial para ayudar a los que más lo necesitan, a través del Fondo del 75 Aniversario.Las congregaciones que participen en el Domingo Episcopal de Alivio y Desarrollo tendrán disponible un folleto especial para insertar en su boletín dominical.“Me siento profundamente agradecido por las tantas personas y congregaciones que mantienen en sus oraciones a lo largo del año a la Agencia Episcopal de Alivio y Desarrollo y sus socios”, dijo Rob Radtke, el presidente de la organización. “Este aniversario 75 es una oportunidad especial en que los episcopales podemos enfocar nuestras prácticas espirituales de Cuaresma en esfuerzos que alivien la pobreza, el hambre y la enfermedad, a través de sus meditaciones diarias y del Domingo Episcopal de Alivio y Desarrollo”.Los folletos en PDF y otros recursos materiales para la cuaresma aparecen publicados en la página web de la Agencia Episcopal de Alivio y Desarrollo en episcopalrelief.org/cuaresma. Las personas que deseen recibir devocionales diarios por correo electrónico pueden inscribirse en dicha página.Los folletos impresos deben solicitarse antes del 4 de febrero para poder recibirlos antes del 18 de febrero, Miércoles de Ceniza, y pueden pedirse en línea desde Marketplace Episcopal o llamando al1.866.937.2772.La Cuaresma fue designada en la Convención General de 2009 como un momento para animar a las diócesis, congregaciones y personas a recordar y apoyar el vital trabajo que realiza la Agencia Episcopal de Alivio y Desarrollo. Aunque el primer domingo de Cuaresma es el día oficial, las congregaciones pueden observar la celebración Episcopal de Alivio y Desarrollo durante cualquier domingo de la temporada de Cuaresma.“Los Cristianos aprovechan esta temporada para considerar cómo sus vidas reflejan las enseñanzas de compasión, justicia y entrega sacrificada de Jesús”, comenta McConnell. “La Agencia Episcopal de Alivio y Desarrollo ayuda a los episcopales a poner en práctica esos valores al conectarlos con las necesidades globales y al crear oportunidades para participar de forma más profunda en problemas que nos impactan a todos. Nos sentimos agradecidos y orgullosos de trabajar juntos por un futuro brillante de las comunidades en todo el mundo.” Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Knoxville, TN Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Course Director Jerusalem, Israel The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Meditaciones de Cuaresma del 75 Aniversario de la Agencia Episcopal de Alivio y Desarrollo TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit a Job Listing An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Bath, NC Submit an Event Listing Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Press Release Press Release Service Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Posted Jan 12, 2015 Featured Events Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Rector Columbus, GA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Tampa, FL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Youth Minister Lorton, VA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Featured Jobs & Calls Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Belleville, IL Rector Smithfield, NC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Pittsburgh, PAlast_img read more

Georgia activists ask for end to executions of intellectually disabled

first_img Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Hopkinsville, KY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit an Event Listing In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Belleville, IL Rector Bath, NC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Shreveport, LA Featured Events Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET [Episcopal Diocese of Atlanta] Death penalty opponents this week asked lawmakers to bring Georgia into line with all other states for how the state determines whether death row inmates are intellectually disabled.When the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in 2002 that it is unconstitutional to execute people with intellectual disabilities Georgia was first to establish new rules. But, Georgia is now the only state to require the beyond a reasonable doubt standard, meaning that there be no doubt that an inmate is intellectually disabled. Of the states still executing prisoners, 24 require a preponderance of evidence and four use the clear and convincing standard, both less stringent levels of proof.The Rev. Joseph Shippen of Christ Church, Macon, who is also a death row chaplain, represents Bishop Robert C. Wright at a press conference following meetings with legislators. Photo: Diocese of AtlantaThe Rev. Joseph Shippen of Christ Church, Macon, who represented Bishop Robert C. Wright at a press conference following the meetings with legislators, said that The Episcopal Church has since 1954 been on record opposing the death penalty.“We cannot stand by and support our State treating human beings, God’s beloved children, as disposable objects,” Shippen said. Of particular concern, he said, is the increasing pace of executions.“In 2015 alone, two men have already been executed, and as I speak Kelly Gissendaner is scheduled to be put to death on Feb. 25,” he said.Gissendaner, convicted in 1998 of having her boyfriend kill her husband, would be the first woman executed in Georgia since 1945 when Lena Baker was electrocuted for killing her employer. Baker received a full pardon in 2005, when the Georgia Board of Pardons and Paroles agreed with her family’s argument that Baker acted in self-defense and should have been charged with manslaughter.The first man put to death in 2015, Andrew Brannon, was a decorated Vietnam veteran who committed his crime as a result of his PTSD that he acquired in wartime, Shippen said. “What does it say about the way we treat veterans in our state when we execute those who struggle with the disabilities acquired as a result of heroic service on our behalf?”The second man put to death in Georgia this year, Warren Hill, had an IQ of 70. “He was clearly intellectually disabled, and that should have disqualified him from the death penalty,” Shippen said. “He was unable to prove his intellectual disability, though, because Georgia is alone in our country in requiring that a condemned person must prove his intellectual disability beyond a reasonable doubt, a standard that is almost impossible to meet.”Sara Totonchi, who heads the Southern Center for Human Rights, told an audience of about 30 gathered in the Capitol Rotunda,that despite the quickening pace of executions in Georgia there is reason for hope that the death penalty is nearing an end in the United States.“Twenty years ago, the notion that the United States might abandon capital punishment was inconceivable,” Totonchi said. “In the past 10 years, however, we have witnessed a seismic shift in the opposite direction” with six states abandoning executing prisoners in the past six year.She said that despite Georgia’s “thirst for vengeance and our politicians’ tough-on-crime mantras, the tide is turning here as well.” Last year, Totonchi said, there were 35 executions in just seven states, the fewest number is 20 years.Shippen and Totonchi were joined at the press conference by representatives of the anti-death penalty group Georgians for Alternatives to the Death Penalty GFADP), the Georgia Council for Developmental Disabilities and longtime death penalty opponent Sen. Vincent Fort of Atlanta.GFADP Chair Kathryn Hamoudah said, “Georgia’s legal system is once more bringing shame and embarrassment to our state by failing to protect those who are most vulnerable.“We continue to set the bar for the most inhumane and unjust practices,” Hamoudah said. “Without intervention by the Georgia General Assembly, Georgia will undoubtedly continue to execute people with intellectual disabilities.”Currently, no bills have been filed addressing the level of proof for establishing intellectual disability for death row inmates.An article on the lobby day by death-penalty opponents appeared in the Feb. 11 issue of the Athens Banner-Herald— Don Plummer is communications coordinator for community and media relations for the Diocese of Atlanta. Rector Tampa, FL Press Release Service Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Georgia activists ask for end to executions of intellectually disabled Diocese of Atlanta joins other death-penalty opponents lobbying legislators Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Knoxville, TN Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Pittsburgh, PA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Associate Rector Columbus, GA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC By Don PlummerPosted Feb 11, 2015 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Featured Jobs & Calls AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Washington, DC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Rector Albany, NY Rector Collierville, TN Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Submit a Press Release Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Smithfield, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit a Job Listing The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group last_img read more

Los obispos se oponen por abrumadora mayoría a la desinversión…

first_img In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Por Matthew Davies Posted Jul 3, 2015 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York General Convention, An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Rector Martinsville, VA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Shreveport, LA Los obispos se oponen por abrumadora mayoría a la desinversión en Israel y Palestina Featured Events Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Featured Jobs & Calls Tags Cathedral Dean Boise, ID AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Hopkinsville, KY Press Release Service Submit an Event Listing [Episcopal News Service – Salt Lake City] La Cámara de Obispos envió un enérgico y claro mensaje el 2 de julio de que desinvertir de compañías y corporaciones que participan en algunos negocios relacionados con el Estado de Israel no responde a los mejores intereses de la Iglesia Episcopal, a sus asociados en Tierra Santa, a las relaciones interreligiosas y a las vidas de los palestinos en el terreno.Los obispos rechazaron la Resolución sustituta D016, que le pedía al Comité sobre Responsabilidad Social Corporativa (CSR) del Consejo Ejecutivo que elaborara una lista de corporaciones estadounidenses y extranjeras que proveen bienes y servicios que apoyan la infraestructura de la ocupación de Israel “para supervisar sus inversiones y aplicar su política de CSR a cualesquiera posibles inversiones futuras” en tales compañías.Aunque la resolución no usaba la palabra “desinversión”, algunos obispos expresaron su preocupación de que se encaminara en esa dirección. Otros recordaron a la Cámara que el arzobispo Suheil Dawani, de la Diócesis Episcopal de Jerusalén, ha instado a la Iglesia Episcopal a no adoptar una política que le hiciera más difícil a él administrar sus congregaciones y las más de 30 instituciones de servicios sociales [de su diócesis] en Israel, Jordania, El Líbano, Siria y los Territorios Palestinos. Esas instituciones incluyen escuelas, hospitales, clínicas y centros para individuos con discapacidades y sirven a personas de todas las fes.“Cualquier amago de desinversión dificultará el ministerio del arzobispo Suheil Dawani y de sus sacerdotes y congregaciones en el Oriente Medio”, dijo el obispo Jay Magness, sufragáneo para los Ministerios Federales que sirvió en el Comité Legislativo sobre Justicia Social y Política Internacional que estudió las resoluciones. “El Tesorero nos aseguró que no tenemos ninguna inversión directa en las compañías que suelen mencionarse”, tales como Caterpillar, Hewlett Packard, G4S y Motorola Solutions.El obispo Prince Singh, of Rochester, presidente del comité, también confirmó que la Iglesia Episcopal no tiene actualmente ninguna inversión en corporaciones que afecten negativamente a los palestinos en el terreno.El obispo Ed Little, de Indiana Norte, dijo que el texto de la resolución “clara e inequívocamente aboga por el boicot y la desinversión, y debemos rechazarla… Como anglicanos, tenemos el don y la capacidad de llegar a las personas de ambas partes del conflicto. Eso es lo que la Iglesia Episcopal está haciendo en el Oriente Medio. Nuestro actual liderazgo bajo la Obispa Primada nos está permitiendo ser pacificadores”.La obispa primada Katharine Jefferts Schori condujo en enero una peregrinación interreligiosa a Tierra Santa, tal como recomendaba la Resolución B019 de la Convención General 2012, la cual exigía la inversión positiva “como un medio necesario de crear una economía sólida y una infraestructura sostenible” en los Territorios Palestinos.Little reconoció también el rechazo del Consejo Ejecutivo de boicots, desinversiones y sanciones a través de su comité sobre CSR, el cual pone énfasis en la “inversión positiva” y en la “participación corporativa” para alentar un cambio positivo en el conflicto entre israelíes y palestinos.El Rdo. Gary Commins, diputado de Los Ángeles y miembro del comité de política internacional, dijo a ENS que está decepcionado por el voto de los obispos, que él describió como “funcionando por temor, que nunca es algo bueno para gente de fe”.Donna Hicks, coordinadora de la Red Palestina e Israel de la Fraternidad Episcopal de la Paz dijo: “Nos estimula el hecho de que los obispos y los diputados entiendan que este es un asunto apremiante y que la discusión en esta convención no se centró en si ha de tomarse una decisión, sino en cuál decisión resultaría más efectiva… Somos optimistas de que la votación de hoy es sólo otro paso en nuestro proceso para garantizar que no estamos lucrando de la ocupación y que le desinversión se aprobará en una Convención General en un futuro próximo”.La Convención General aprobó dos resoluciones sobre pacificación. La Resolución sustituta B013, propuesta por el obispo Nick Knisely, de Rhode Island, “reafirma la vocación de la Iglesia como agente de reconciliación y de justicia restauradora” y reconoce que “una reconciliación significativa puede ayudar a engendrar una paz sostenible y duradera y que tal reconciliación debe incorporarse tanto a la acción política como a los empeños de base promovidos localmente”.Knisely dijo que su resolución es parte de un proceso “que nos invita a todos nosotros a un conversación más amplia a lo largo del próximo trienio para dialogar mediante” una inversión positiva.Él le recordó a los obispos que la Sociedad Misionera Nacional y Extranjera invirtió $500.000 en el Banco de Palestina en 2013 para fines de desarrollo económico en los Territorios Palestinos.El obispo Leo Frade, del Sudeste de la Florida, dijo que su experiencia de embargos y bloqueos, en particular el embargo de Cuba, es que “afecta a las mismas personas que creemos estar ayudando. Los empleos palestinos dependen de la inversión, no de la desinversión”.La Resolución C018 expresa solidaridad y apoyo hacia los cristianos en Israel y en los territorios bajo ocupación israelí; afirma la obra de la Diócesis Episcopal de Jerusalén en recuperación, educación y cuidado pastoral; y respalda la labor de los cristianos comprometidos en hacer relaciones, en el diálogo interreligioso, en el adiestramiento en la no violencia y en la defensa de los derechos de los palestinos. La resolución insta también a los episcopales a mostrar su solidaridad haciendo una peregrinación a Israel y a los territorios ocupados por Israel y a aprender de los hermanos cristianos de la región.Al tiempo que la Convención General se reunía el 25 de junio, el conflicto israelí-palestino era el foco de siete resoluciones para las cuales el Comité de Justicia Social y Política Internacional abrió el debate al testimonio público en tres audiencias legislativas.Unas 50 personas testificaron sobre las resoluciones relacionadas con Israel y Palestina que iban desde pedir una inversión más a fondo en asociaciones en el Oriente Medio a pedir que la Iglesia boicoteara a las compañías y corporaciones dedicadas a ciertos negocios con el Estado de Israel y desinvirtiera de ellas.Varias personas hablaron de la necesidad de ponerle fin a la ocupación israelí de tierras palestinas mediante presiones económicas, diciendo que la actual política de la Iglesia de inversión positiva había demostrado ser inadecuada. Otras subrayaron el imperativo cristiano del compromiso y el diálogo, citando temores de cualesquiera medidas que pudieran causar mayores dificultades para el pueblo palestino y para la Diócesis Episcopal de Jerusalén.— Matthew Davies es redactor y reportero de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Curate Diocese of Nebraska An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Albany, NY Submit a Job Listing Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY General Convention 2015 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Collierville, TN Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit a Press Release Rector Bath, NC Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DClast_img read more

Ng Moon Hing installed as Archbishop of South East Asia

first_imgNg Moon Hing installed as Archbishop of South East Asia Rector Washington, DC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Anglican Communion, Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Tags Submit a Job Listing Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA People Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Tampa, FL Rector Bath, NC Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Featured Jobs & Calls Director of Music Morristown, NJ By Gavin DrakePosted Feb 22, 2016 Featured Events Rector Smithfield, NC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Asia, Cathedral Dean Boise, ID This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Archbishop Ng Moon Hing is installed as the Primate of South East Asia during a service at Saint Mary’s Cathedral, Kuala Lumpur[Anglican Communion News Service]  The new Archbishop of South East Asia, the Most Revd Ng Moon Hing, was installed Feb.22 during a service in Saint Mary’s Cathedral in Malaysia’s capital Kuala Lumpur. It was an appointment that could never have been anticipated when he was born into family of Buddhist Taoists; and it wasn’t until he was aged 20 that he discovered Christ and became the first person of his family to convert to Christianity.“I was brought by friends to a church and there I was convicted and found Christ,” Archbishop Hing told ACNS. “It was difficult at the beginning because my parents were very against it. None of my family were Christian and I had to journey alone in those early days.“A couple of years down the road I graduated from the university and I worked for a number of years as a civil engineer. And then I received a call – actually, I received the call before I graduated so the call carried on until I realised the time is right. So I quit the job and entered into ministry.After a few years of theological training he was ordained at the age of 30. After serving his curacy he was sent to serve St Peter’s Church in Ipoh and remained there for the next 20 years. Three opportunities to transfer to other posts during that time didn’t materialise as his bishop had other plans. And so he remained there until 2007 when he was appointed Bishop of West Malaysia.In September, Moon Hing was elected Archbishop of the province in succession to the Bishop of Kuching, the Rt Revd Bolly Lapok; and he was installed today at a service that included 300 invited dignitaries, ecumenical and overseas guests.The province of South East Asia contains four dioceses. In addition to West Malaysia, which covers peninsula Malaya, there are two additional Malaysian dioceses: Kuching and Sabah in northern Borneo; and also the Diocese of Singapore.But the Province is much bigger than this, extending into Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, Indonesia and Nepal: all of which are country-wide missionary deaneries. Legally, these missionary deaneries are part of the Diocese of Singapore; but for all practical purposes they are deaneries of the province and the whole province is engaged in missionary activity with them.The reason they exist as missionary deaneries is an accident of history, Archbishop Moon Hing says. “Originally, these were non-British colonies. . . The British had churches in some of these places but mainly for the British ambassadors or High Commissioners or for some British traders. For many years they were just an outpost, but nobody looked after them.”In a series of reorganisations during the past 200 years, the churches in those countries were moved from the Diocese of Calcutta to the Diocese of Borneo until being move, in 1909, to the Diocese of Singapore. Shortly afterwards, plans were devised to create a Province of East Asia, bringing together those dioceses that were, at that time, extra-provincial to the Diocese of Canterbury in the Church of England.But then came World War II and, with it, turmoil amongst the countries in Asia. The Council of Churches in East Asia brought together the Anglican churches of the region; and it still exists as a wider confederation of Anglican churches. But plans for a single regional province were abandoned as, firstly, Japan, and then the Philippines, Korea, South East Asia and then Hong Kong became their own provinces. The Diocese of Taiwan remained part of the (American) Episcopal Church – Province VIII of TEC.But for the missionary deaneries of Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, Indonesia and Nepal remained missionary deaneries under the Diocese of Singapore.“For the first 90 years of the Diocese of Singapore it was difficult to look after these places except to just do confirmations and occasional visits,” Archbishop Moon Hing said. “The Church was too small and had gone through political changes in the diocese and later on there was country divisions and war and all those things.“And so as the Church in the ‘90s became stronger and more established in both Singapore and West Malaysia, we said it is time for us to look after all these countries.” When the Province of South East Asia was formed in 1996, it took on responsibility for the “outpost” churches in those countries and shared responsibility for them throughout the province.“So now the whole province [is responsible for them]”, the Archbishop said. “They became deanery countries. Though legally they are part of Singapore, in actual effect they are deanery countries of the province. It is the province looking after them.“Our aim is that every one of these countries will have a diocese by themselves. They are very fast growing in all these places. The fastest growing is Nepal, and even after the earthquake it is growing faster than beyond our expectation. Now they range about 10,000 members going to church every Sunday.”The Province of South East Asia is, and always has been, focused on mission and outreach. On its creation 30 years ago the Province established two province-wide bodies: Pynet – the Provincial Youth Network; and Proseams – the Province of South East Asia Missions Services. Moon Hing was the president chair of Proseams until his installation today.Proseams brings together representatives of the four dioceses; and together they make annual mission visits to all of the missionary deaneries to help, encourage and provide resources – manpower and money. “We try to understand the culture and make it relevant to help them,” the Archbishop said.In addition to the province-wide Proseams, there are now diocesan mission bodies which work with those countries allocated to their dioceses. While remaining, legally, under the Diocese of Singapore, the countries have been allocated and “adopted” by the four dioceses for the purpose of providing mission assistance and support. “We adopt them and we plant our own church and we send out people, we sent out money.”The approach is producing remarkable growth in the missionary deaneries. The Anglican Church in Nepal saw a growth of 33.3 per cent from the previous year following the recent earthquake – and that’s on top of a usual annual growth rate of 11 per cent. “The main reason [for the growth] is because of the proactive work of Proseams making vision a reality,” Archbishop Moon Hing said.All of this is taking place in a region where Christians are in a minority. The population of the Province of South East Asia is around 500 million; of which not more than one per cent is Christian. In every one of these countries we are a minority and so we work very sensitively,” Archbishop Moon Hing said. “And the people look at Christianity as a foreign religion – a religion of the white people.“So for that reason we often have common ground to work on – all these deanery countries and in Malaysia and Singapore, we have to work [with the understanding] that we are going to be unpopular and seen as foreign.“We have been doing this for many years and so it is not strange to us. . . And we are very culturally aware. We make sure that we do not antagonise the culture. We tread very carefully.”The Province uses two main approaches to its evangelism: its main focus is on friendship evangelism, but it also does evangelism through education, through schools and through social ministry. And while the way this is done varies throughout the missionary deaneries, the common focus is on education and the teaching of the English language.In Vietnam, the Province has established a number of tuition centres to teach English and also runs two-week stays for high school or university students at the church compound in Singapore where the participants will use English. “It fills up very quickly. People are lining up to come,” the Archbishop said.In Cambodia, the Province has established the Khmer [pronounced Cam-igh] Hope centre providing two years of free education in computer skills, cooking, hotel skills and mechanics to train people to work in in hotels, embassies, or big corporations. They are also teaching people to make palm sugar. “A lot of people grow palms but they don’t know what to do with it,” Archbishop Moon Hing said. “We teach them how to make palm sugar and export it.”In Laos, the Province established Arda – the Anglican Relief and Development Agency – as a relief development centre. But they soon abandoned all but the English language teaching. It now offers teaching from primary to secondary school and even adults. It is so successful that the government sends its officers to ARDA to learn English. And the government has asked the Province to expand the work of Arda to two further cities.In Thailand, the Province established Salem homes to provide accommodation for families of people staying in hospital who could not afford hotel costs to visit them. In the houses, Bible study and evangelism takes place every other night. There are a large number of Anglican churches in Thailand and construction is underway on a building which will become a diocesan centre once the deanery is reconstituted as a diocese.In Indonesia, the Province runs a microfinance scheme offering grants of less than £100 GBP to help people start their own businesses. One recipient used the grant to buy fruit and plastic bags. They cut and portion up the fruit into the plastic bags and then travel around offices to sell it to the workers.In Nepal, the Province runs children’s centres and children’s homes and is actively involved in reconstruction and support following the April and May 2015 earthquakes.These social action programmes are why many people in the Province have converted to Christianity. But Archbishop Moon Hing stresses that the provision of care is not dependent upon a conversion. “In no way are we forcing anybody to become Christians,” he said. “In no way are we giving them money to lure them. . . We are just doing good work, become their friends, minister to the needy and the marginalised and the sick. And some of them come in.”And he said that many of the new Christians not only join the church as members but also join in the missionary work to “reach out to more people.”Throughout the myriad social action activities, there is one common theme: the teaching of the English language. “Everybody wants to learn English,” Archbishop Moon Hing said. “When we do church, we use their language. But when we teach them we do it in English because everybody wants to learn English – even the government officers – because that is the only language they can communicate with the world.“They cannot use Vietnamese to communicate with the world or Cambodian. So if they have to communicate with the world it is only in English. In Malaysia and Singapore, we were British colonies so we have stronger English and can help them in many ways.”When asked how many languages exist in the Province, Archbishop Moon Hing laughs. “Many!,” he said. “Too many to count. Hundreds.“Sometimes we need translation into two or three languages before people can understand. Let’s say I do English. Then they have to translate into their national language and then they have to translate into their local language.”In rural areas, church services take place in the local language; but in the cities many churches hold multiple services to cater for different language groups. “In Saint Mary’s Cathedral we have 13 services [on Sundays]. We start early and keep going, keep going and keep going.”The province was built on the not-too-distant work of past missionaries; but the church is now an indigenous affair. On taking up his office today, Moon Hing became the second indigenous Archbishop of the Province.Missionaries are still welcome in the Province – but to work in teaching and education roles rather than church leadership. Missionaries today in South East Asia are only to be found in the missionary deaneries. There are 15 of them in Laos, mainly from Britain, Australia and New Zealand; but also from Malaysia and Singapore.And they serve a useful purpose: “non-Christians are looking at [the Church] as a foreign religion, so they are slow to come in,” Archbishop Moon Hing said; “but because English is the main thing in the whole of our region, if they want to learn English they want to learn it from white faces.“They don’t want to learn it from us – the non-whites – so we still need the missionaries to be in the forefront to teach all these things. We train our people to be involved; but every-time we have white people to teach English we have a lot of people who want to go to their classes; but when we see Singaporeans or Malaysians teaching, less people will go to their classes.”As he takes on the leadership of the Province of South East Asia, Archbishop Moon Hing says his focus in the coming years will be in three distinct areas: church, politics and manpower.For the Church, he wants to speed up the process of creating new dioceses in the missionary deanery countries. He said that all of them apart from Laos and Vietnam are “growing quite fast” and he wants to establish a timetable for the creation of dioceses.“The difficulty we have is that we don’t have the money yet,” he said. “We have the people; we have the church; but we don’t have the finance to help them run. Transport will cost a lot – they are too far to meet each other. They don’t have cars, like us, so everything is money.“Nepal is 10,000 members yet we cannot create a diocese because we have to put in a lot of infrastructure like diocesan centres and operations centres to help them to carry on the mission work without us. This work must carry on.”On the political side, the Archbishop points out that the region is “facing great political instability”. He points to countries like Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos which “have not come out of their shell” following the turmoil of the Pol Pot regime; and to Nepal which “changes government like changing clothes”; and to Indonesia and Malaysia which is facing challenges from Islam.“On the political side we are seeing a lot of instability,” the new Archbishop said. “We want to train and disciple the people so that in the event of any changes, their faith in Christ will not change [and that] whether the country is doing well or doing badly they will stick onto Jesus Christ and hold onto him tightly. So we need to intentionally train and help them to become disciples.”And on the issue of manpower, the Archbishop is quite blunt: “We don’t want this generation to do lots of things and the next generation to know nothing at all.” He explained that when he became Bishop of West Malaysia he realised that the age profile of his clergy meant that he would lose half of them through retirement by 2020.“So if I don’t intentionally develop more people we are going to face a manpower shortage,” he said. “Over the past nine years I have developed, trained and equipped many more to come into the ministry. Every year I ordained more than 10 people because I actively developed, trained and equipped them and also encouraged them to give their lives to God.”He said that similar numbers were being ordained in Sabah and Singapore and that people were also being ordained in the deanery countries; although in smaller numbers. He said that the Province had to put a lot of effort into the development of human resources; but acknowledged that “It is a big task, a big job.”For Moon Hing, the transformation from a Buddhist teenager to the Anglican Archbishop of South East Asia began as a “lonely journey”. But he is no longer the only Christian in his family. On his father’s side he has three uncles and an aunt. Three of the four are now Christians as are their families.Moon Hing himself was one of 11 siblings. Of his 10 brothers and sisters, eight have become Christians as have their families. His father died as a non-Christian; but his mother, who had been against his conversion as a 20-year-old has converted. “When my mum became a Christian I baptised her myself,” Archbishop Moon Hing said. “Some 70 or 80 per cent of the whole family are Christians now but we still have 20 to 30 per cent to work on,” he said.He said that there was a lot of joy in his family at his new role. “Everybody is excited; but they they don’t know what the archbishop is all about,” he joked.In the 30-or-so years since being ordained, he said, “I have seen our diocese and our province grow tremendously, very much compared to many regions. We grew in terms of manpower, in terms of finance, in terms of outreaches and in terms of ministry and in the social arena, we grew very much.“I am very happy and very glad to be involved in this era, this time. As Archbishop I will want to see the growth to carry on – if not faster – in order to catch up and prepare ourselves for the worst to come. We do not know what will happen, but extremism is coming our way. Too many extreme things are coming.”But despite the fears for the future, the Province of South East Asia seems well place to face whatever comes its way. “The province is working very well together and we have good fellowship together,” Archbishop Moon Hing said. “The House of Bishops and the House of Clergy meet and we share resources amongst one another dioceses and missionary countries very well. I have been around quite a bit and I have not seen such a co-operative spirit in many places. It is just beautiful here. I am very glad I am here in this time serving God.” Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit a Press Release TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Curate Diocese of Nebraska An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Belleville, IL In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Collierville, TN Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Martinsville, VA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Albany, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GAlast_img read more

Pakistan: Suicide bomber targets Christians in deadly Easter Day attack

first_img Rector Albany, NY Submit a Job Listing Anglican Communion, In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Asia, AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Knoxville, TN Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Pakistan: Suicide bomber targets Christians in deadly Easter Day attack Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Press Release Service Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 [Minority Concern of Pakistan] At least 70 people have been killed, including 29 children, and more than 340 injured in a suicide blast on Easter Day at Gulshan Iqbal Park, Lahore, the capital of Punjab province, Pakistan. About 3,000 people were visiting the park at the time of blast.A suicide bomber blew himself up at the exit gate of the park where many Christians, mainly women and children, were celebrating Easter following prayer services. So far, bodies of 10 Christian families have been identified. According to The News, children were playing on swings and enjoying other recreational facilities available in the park along with their parents when the attacker struck at 6:35 p.m. Many eyewitnesses told media that there was no security in and around the park.Jamat-ul-Ahrar, a splinter group of the Pakistani Taliban, has claimed responsibility for the deadly attack.Bishop Samuel Azariah, moderator of the Church of Pakistan (United), posted a video message on his Facebook page shortly after the bombing. He said some of the victims were members of his Diocese of Raiwind. “Please keep us in your prayers and may this time of Easter, the celebration of Christ’s victory over death and grave, be a meaningful and a consoling experience for many of our people who are in the hospital at the moment,” he said.The Punjab government announced three days of mourning in memory of the victims, and Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif chaired a meeting after the blast to review the security situation in the country.Terrorist attacks targeting Christians are not uncommon in Pakistan. In March 2015, 21 people were killed and more than 80 injured in suicide attacks by the Taliban at two churches in Youhanabad, a Christian neighborhood in Lahore. In September 2013, Taliban suicide bombers attacked All Saints Church in Peshawar, the capital of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province, where more than 80 were killed, and about 120 people were injured. The majority of them were women and children.The alleged suicide bomber in the Easter Day attack was identified as Mohammad Yousaf from district Muzaffargarh, Southern Punjab. The Inter-Service Public Relations (ISPR) said March 28 that a number of alleged terrorists and their facilitators have been arrested in anti-terrorism raid conducted in Lahore, Faisalabad and Multan.— Aftab Alexander Mughal is the editor of the Minority Concern of Pakistan magazine and former national executive secretary of the Justice and Peace Commission of Pakistan. Rector Hopkinsville, KY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Belleville, IL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Tags Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Featured Jobs & Calls Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL By Aftab Alexander MughalPosted Mar 28, 2016 Submit an Event Listing Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Smithfield, NC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Holy Week/Easter Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Shreveport, LA Featured Events Submit a Press Release Rector Washington, DC Rector Collierville, TN The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group last_img read more

Video: Archbishop of Canterbury preaches at Roman vespers

first_img Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK [Episcopal News Service] Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby preaches during vespers at San Gregorio al Celio in Rome as part of the celebrations to mark 50 years of closer and deeper relationships between the Anglican Communion and the Roman Catholic Church. Rector Washington, DC Rector Martinsville, VA Director of Music Morristown, NJ TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit a Job Listing Featured Jobs & Calls Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Video Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit an Event Listing Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Albany, NY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit a Press Release Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Tampa, FL Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Video: Archbishop of Canterbury preaches at Roman vespers Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Anglican Communion, Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Ecumenical Vespers 2016, Rector Smithfield, NC center_img Rector Collierville, TN The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Ecumenical & Interreligious, Rector Belleville, IL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Events Curate Diocese of Nebraska Press Release Service Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rome50th, Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Posted Oct 6, 2016 Tags Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Archbishop of Canterbury, Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DClast_img read more