With virus in rearview, campaign for Catalan vote kicks off

first_imgMADRID (AP) — Political parties in Spain’s Catalonia region are scheduled to start campaigning for an election set to be held in two weeks The northeastern region has loosened a ban on traveling between municipalities to allow for political rallies with reduced attendance and mask-wearing and social distancing requirements.. That the vote will take place on Feb. 14 as scheduled is not 100% confirmed. The election taking place as scheduled on Feb. 14 is not 100% certain. Catalonia’s High Court needs to confirm its preliminary decision earlier this month to overturn a regional government order to delay the vote for nearly three months due to health concerns.last_img read more

Dorm builds community between hall and home

first_imgLe Mans Hall has found a home in the South Bend-Mishawaka community-specifically, Hannah’s House.  The College’s largest dorm has paired up with this local organization, which provides shelter to pregnant women and new mothers. Junior Emma Derheimer, president of Le Mans Hall, said it was her goal for the year to find a service project for the women of Le Mans. “Every dorm on Saint Mary’s campus is paired up with a service agency in the community,” Derheimer said. “My board’s primary goal this year was to get more involved in the service aspect of Le Mans.” Senior Morgan Talamantes said she serves as the College’s first ministry assistant, a job that includes working as an official liaison between Hannah’s House and the Hall. She said the maternity home, originally intended for unwed teenagers, advises residents about how to raise their children and manage money. Though the women do not pay to live in the home, Hannah’s House expects them to work and contribute to the community. Talamantes said she worked with the dorm’s student board members to arrange a variety of opportunities for students to get involved with Hannah’s House. Students have participated in Mothers Support Group meetings each month, the Spaghetti Dinner fundraiser hosted by members of Hannah’s House and planning the organization’s annual Fall Festival.  Talamantes said the Hall also hosts events for the residents of Hannah’s House. During one such event, the residents painted clothes for their children. “The mothers came to [Saint Mary’s] to paint onesies and then took them home for their children,” Talamantes said.  Derheimer said last month, the dorm held a baby shower for a mother in Hannah’s House. Donations included basic necessities for the newborn and the mother. “As a social work major, I believe that we’re here to make a difference and we have the will to impact the South Bend-Mishawaka community,” Derheimer said. “We’ve shown the community beyond our campus that we do care and are interested in making an active difference.” Talamantes said both the Hall and the House benefit from working together to help these women.  “It’s been great meeting different mothers – and, of course, their babies,” Talamantes said. “We definitely learn from each other. Getting to know them builds students’ enthusiasm. We can build a community within the Hall and the home.” Students may sometimes act as role models for the members of Hannah’s House, Talamantes said.  “In a way, we show mothers that they can still fulfill their dreams,” she said. Derheimer said Saint Mary’s students can help the young mothers find ways to succeed. “We also bring support and show that that we care to give mom the feeling she is not alone. We know they want to succeed because they live there. All they need are the resources,” Derheimer said. “We can be a part of facilitating that.” Talamantes said her work with Hannah’s House has showed her the value of the partnership between the College and the organization. “Working with Hannah’s House has showed me the importance of continuing this partnership. We work well together,” Talamantes said. “I hope that once I graduate it grows into something bigger and blossoms.” Hannah’s House will celebrate its 20th anniversary by opening a new house May 10, Talamantes said. Bishop Kevin Rhoades will bless the home. Students are encouraged to attend.last_img read more

Surgeon with Ebola heads to US for care

first_img Share Sharing is caring! Share Share Tweetcenter_img 258 Views   no discussions HealthInternationalLifestylePrint Surgeon with Ebola heads to US for care by: – November 14, 2014 (Photo: AP)FREETOWN, Sierra Leone (AP) — A surgeon working in Sierra Leone has been diagnosed with Ebola and will be flown Saturday to the United States for treatment, officials from Sierra Leone and the United States said.Dr Martin Salia is being taken to Omaha to be treated at the Nebraska Medical Center, Sierra Leone’s chief medical officer, Dr Brima Kargbo, told The Associated Press on Friday. The US Embassy in Freetown said Salia himself was paying for the expensive evacuation.A Sierra Leone citizen, the 44-year-old Salia lives in Maryland and is a permanent US resident, according to a person in the United States with direct knowledge of the situation. The person was not authorised to release the information and spoke on condition of anonymity.The doctor will be the third Ebola patient at the Omaha hospital and the 10th person with Ebola to be treated in the US The last, Dr Craig Spencer, was released from a New York hospital on Tuesday.The Nebraska Medical Center said Thursday it had no official confirmation that it would be treating another patient, but that an Ebola patient in Sierra Leone would be evaluated for possible transport to the hospital. The patient would arrive Saturday afternoon.Salia is a general surgeon who had been working at Kissy United Methodist Hospital in the Sierra Leone capital of Freetown, according to the person familiar with the case. He came down with symptoms of Ebola on November 6 but test results were negative for the deadly virus. He was tested again on Monday, and he tested positive. Salia is in stable condition at an Ebola treatment centre in Freetown. It wasn’t clear whether he had been involved in the care of Ebola patients.last_img read more

This global map of manure could help save farming as we know

first_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe The researchers hope their map will encourage countries, including India, Brazil, China, and the United States (which together use 66% of the world’s phosphorus fertilizer), to support phosphorus recycling. Not only would more recycling reduce imports, but it would also help the environment by eliminating manure—and its phosphorus—from the water supply. It could also put a few more years on our phosphorus clock. By Rachel CrowellMay. 7, 2019 , 12:30 PM This global map of manure could help save farming as we know it To grow the world’s wheat, corn, and beans, farmers need phosphorus—an essential nutrient that comes from bird and bat droppings and rock deposits. But the global supply of easily mineable phosphorus is dwindling; to stave off the coming drought, scientists are exploring an alternative: recycling animal manure for its phosphorus content. Now, they’ve come up with the world’s first map of this underappreciated resource, which shows that most manure is exactly where farmers need it—in their own backyards.To make their map (above), researchers used data on livestock density and calculated the annual amount of phosphorus excreted by cattle, pigs, chickens, sheep, and goats globally—as much as a whopping 130,000 kilograms per square kilometer, they report in an upcoming issue of Earth’s Future. (Various estimates put total global production between 15 million to 20 million metric tons per year.) The researchers found “hot spots,” areas in which manure-based phosphorus is a widely available, but underused, on every continent except Antarctica. Unsurprisingly, many of those hot spots are near farming communities and river deltas where agricultural runoff abounds.But reusing old phosphorus is easier said than done. To process pig and cow poo, farmers must break it down with bacteria or use special equipment to crystallize its struvite—the same phosphate mineral that makes up some kidney and bladder stones. These processes are already used by many commercial farms, which together help recycle about half the global supply of manure. But they are costly for small family farms, which supply most food in parts of Asia, sub-Saharan Africa, and Latin America. Email Stephen Powers/Washington State University Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrylast_img read more