SMC gift campaign begins

first_imgThe Class Gift Campaign (CGC), a student effort led in conjunction with the Office of Annual Giving, organized the Week. Shelby Herms, Class of 2013 CGC representative, said students’ donations to the Annual Fund go to their class’s CCG account and immediately impact the lives of Saint Mary’s women. “Your gifts accumulate over four years so that you can make a lasting and memorable gift to Saint Mary’s at graduation,” Herms said. “The Class of 2012 donated to the renovation of Angela Athletic facilities, which is one of the options for this year’s gift, as well as a scholarship in our class’s name.” CGC will host a table in the Spes Unica Atrium to collect gifts every morning this week from 9 a.m. to noon, Herms said. The group will sell mugs that say ‘Once a Belle, Always a Belle’ at the CGC table in the Student Center Atrium today through Friday. Tag Week BINGO will be in the West Wing of the Noble Family Dining Hall on Thursday at dinner. While gifts of all amounts are welcomed, Herms said the CGC is pushing for Tribute Gifts of $20.13 in honor of the graduating class. A Tribute Gift is a donation from a student that honors someone who helped with her Saint Mary’s education. Each tribute will be published in the Commencement edition of The Observer and the honoree will be notified by email, Herms said. “I think that [the] Class Gift Campaign is great because it allows us to recognize the gifts of past Belles by giving back to the College like they did,” Herms said. “I never realized just how much it takes to make the Saint Mary’s experience possible.” Junior Maddy Martin, Class of 2014 CGC representative, said she knows how important Tag Week is this year because of the College’s recent Capital Campaign launch to raise funds. “We are really pushing each class to give to their class gift in order to reach our goal dollar amount,” Martin said. “In regards to actual class gifts, the senior class votes at the end of their senior year where they want the gift to go to,” Martin said past classes have donated to the Spes Unica building and the restoration of the Sister Madeleva painting. The Class of 2012’s gift of more than  $20,000 was the largest class gift to date, she said. “I don’t think students realize how much it costs to keep this school running,” Martin said.  “We take for granted electricity and water bills because they are always taken care of for us. It is important for students to have this realization of just how much the College spends to keep us on campus because they are more likely to give back to the school.” Junior Lauren Bruner, Class of 2014 CGC co-chair, said although asking students for money is difficult, it is important to give back to the College. “Many students, including myself, would not be here without scholarships, which shows how vital donations are,” Bruner said. “It’s rewarding to be able to give back to the College and see your gift on campus.” Junior Jillian Fata said it is important for students to recognize the changes the College can make through the campaign.  Past gifts have gone to big project, but they have also gone directly to scholarships, meaning that a future Belle can have the same opportunities that we are fortunate enough to have every day,” Fata said. Class giving is a  important part of being a student as well as an alumna, Herms said. Last year, 7,450 alumnae and friends of the College made a gift to help with the College’s expenses. Twenty percent of the College’s budget is a result of this support, Herms said. “They contributed $10.5 million in gifts to support all aspects of our education – touching every corner of campus, from building new building), to installing wireless internet, to providing toilet paper and hand soap in our bathrooms,” Herms said. We need the help to continue providing the Saint Mary’s experience, and making a gift is a way to say thank you to all of the alumnae who have made your education possible!”,Monday marked the beginning of Saint Mary’s annual Tag Week, which aims to inform students about the costs of running the College and the importance of donations to the school. The Class Gift Campaign (CGC), a student effort led in conjunction with the Office of Annual Giving, organized the Week. Shelby Herms, Class of 2013 CGC representative, said students’ donations to the Annual Fund go to their class’s CCG account and immediately impact the lives of Saint Mary’s women. “Your gifts accumulate over four years so that you can make a lasting and memorable gift to Saint Mary’s at graduation,” Herms said. “The Class of 2012 donated to the renovation of Angela Athletic facilities, which is one of the options for this year’s gift, as well as a scholarship in our class’s name.” CGC will host a table in the Spes Unica Atrium to collect gifts every morning this week from 9 a.m. to noon, Herms said. The group will sell mugs that say ‘Once a Belle, Always a Belle’ at the CGC table in the Student Center Atrium today through Friday. Tag Week BINGO will be in the West Wing of the Noble Family Dining Hall on Thursday at dinner. While gifts of all amounts are welcomed, Herms said the CGC is pushing for Tribute Gifts of $20.13 in honor of the graduating class. A Tribute Gift is a donation from a student that honors someone who helped with her Saint Mary’s education. Each tribute will be published in the Commencement edition of The Observer and the honoree will be notified by email, Herms said. “I think that [the] Class Gift Campaign is great because it allows us to recognize the gifts of past Belles by giving back to the College like they did,” Herms said. “I never realized just how much it takes to make the Saint Mary’s experience possible.” Junior Maddy Martin, Class of 2014 CGC representative, said she knows how important Tag Week is this year because of the College’s recent Capital Campaign launch to raise funds. “We are really pushing each class to give to their class gift in order to reach our goal dollar amount,” Martin said. “In regards to actual class gifts, the senior class votes at the end of their senior year where they want the gift to go to,” Martin said past classes have donated to the Spes Unica building and the restoration of the Sister Madeleva painting. The Class of 2012’s gift of more than  $20,000 was the largest class gift to date, she said. “I don’t think students realize how much it costs to keep this school running,” Martin said.  “We take for granted electricity and water bills because they are always taken care of for us. It is important for students to have this realization of just how much the College spends to keep us on campus because they are more likely to give back to the school.” Junior Lauren Bruner, Class of 2014 CGC co-chair, said although asking students for money is difficult, it is important to give back to the College. “Many students, including myself, would not be here without scholarships, which shows how vital donations are,” Bruner said. “It’s rewarding to be able to give back to the College and see your gift on campus.” Junior Jillian Fata said it is important for students to recognize the changes the College can make through the campaign.  Past gifts have gone to big project, but they have also gone directly to scholarships, meaning that a future Belle can have the same opportunities that we are fortunate enough to have every day,” Fata said. Class giving is a  important part of being a student as well as an alumna, Herms said. Last year, 7,450 alumnae and friends of the College made a gift to help with the College’s expenses. Twenty percent of the College’s budget is a result of this support, Herms said. “They contributed $10.5 million in gifts to support all aspects of our education – touching every corner of campus, from building new building), to installing wireless internet, to providing toilet paper and hand soap in our bathrooms,” Herms said. We need the help to continue providing the Saint Mary’s experience, and making a gift is a way to say thank you to all of the alumnae who have made your education possible!”last_img read more

CAES DC Fellows

first_imgThis summer, seven University of Georgia students have embarked on the opportunity of a lifetime, serving as UGA Congressional Agricultural Fellows in Washington, D.C. The offices of Georgia Senators David Perdue and Johnny Isakson and Representatives Sanford Bishop, Doug Collins, Buddy Carter, Rick Allen and Austin Scott are hosting the students during the 12-week fellowship in the nation’s capital. The students, who attend UGA’s College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES), prepare briefs, attend committee hearings and conduct food- and agriculture-related research. In addition, they have the option of earning credit hours towards graduation. “Ag Fellows are full-time employees of the congressional offices and serve as apprentice staff members,” said Josef Broder, CAES associate dean for academic affairs and the fellowship program coordinator. “Many will be asked to serve as mentors to other student interns.” Students representing the University of Georgia as 2015 Congressional Agricultural Fellows include Dowdy White, of Cordele, Georgia; Matthew Pace, of Lyerly, Georgia; Nicole Holden, of Greensboro, Georgia; Casey Chastain, of Helen, Georgia; Kelsie Bickett, of Chickamauga, Georgia; Katelin Benkoski, of Madison, Georgia; and Ethan Perkins, of Brooklet, Georgia. Matthew Pace, a senior studying agricultural and applied economics, will be working in Sen. Johnny Isakson’s office. Matthew is the son of Wayne and Kari Pace. Nicole Holden, a senior studying agribusiness with a certificate in agrosecurity, will be working in Rep. Austin Scott’s office. Nicole is the daughter of Don and Andrea Holden. Kelsie Bickett, a senior studying agricultural communication, will be working in Sen. David Perdue’s office. Kelsie is the daughter of Todd and Alisa Bickett. Katelin Benkoski, a senior studying animal science and agribusiness, will be working in Rep. Buddy Carter’s office. Katelin is the daughter of John and Julie Benkoski. Dowdy White, a senior studying agricultural communication, will be working in Rep. Sanford Bishop’s office. Dowdy is the son of Billy and Gwen White. Casey Chastain, a junior studying agricultural communication and education, will be working in Rep. Doug Collins’ office. Casey is the daughter of Brad and Lori Chastain. Ethan Perkins, a junior studying agricultural communication, will be working in Rep. Rick Allen’s office. Ethan is the son of Emory and Kristie Perkins. The Congressional Agricultural Fellowship is made available through the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Deans’ Promise program. A collection of enrichment opportunities ranging from internships to study abroad opportunities, the Deans’ Promise program encourages CAES students to take advantage of unique, out-of-the-classroom opportunities during their time in college. For more information on the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, the Deans’ Promise or other opportunities available to UGA students, visit caes.uga.edu.last_img read more

Help! My Boyfriend Carries My Kayak and I Hate It

first_imgDear Mountain Mama,I’ve recently started dating another kayaker. He’s always trying to carry my boat or load it on the car for me. While I realize he’s just trying to be nice, I don’t want him to think I can’t do these things for myself. I’m independent, and have been paddling fine without him for years. How do I tell him not to touch my boat without being rude?Thanks, Can-Do-It-MyselfDear Can-Do-It-Myself,Of course you’re more than capable of picking a kayak up and hoisting it onto the roof rack. You’re also fit enough to lug a forty plus pound boat on your shoulder. But just because you can do these things perfectly fine, doesn’t mean you should.Sometimes the best gift we can give someone else is recognizing and accepting love. Some men bring their girlfriends chocolates or flowers. Other men kayak with their significant others and demonstrate their manliness by carrying heavy objects for them while pounding their chests, cavemen style. Can-Do, let this man who’s so eager to impress take your heavy load. And then thank him.My good friend is a capable in the outdoors by all accounts. She shreds on a snowboard and knows her way down difficult rivers. She’s also an avid mountain biker and trail runner. The first time I paddled with her and her husband, I was surprised when we got to the take-out and she didn’t pop her spray skirt right away and hop out of her boat. Instead, she called, “Honey, princess pull please.”She winked at me, as she asked, “Have you ever gotten a princess pull?”When I said no, she told her husband to give me one too. He bent over and pulled my boat up the bank far enough that I didn’t have to get my feet wet. And then he bowed low, making a sweeping gesture with his hand. It made me giggle. I did indeed feel like a princess, the best kind possible, a paddling princess.Can-Do, boat with this paddling hunk of yours. Feel free to surf better or take harder lines down rapids. But by all means, accept whatever love he offers you, whether it’s a special rock he found at the put-in, a snack he’s carried in his dry bag, or his willingness to carry your boat. All these are little love offerings are his way of showing you how strong and kind he is.Yours,Mountain Mamalast_img read more