SMC gift campaign begins

first_imgThe Class Gift Campaign (CGC), a student effort led in conjunction with the Office of Annual Giving, organized the Week. Shelby Herms, Class of 2013 CGC representative, said students’ donations to the Annual Fund go to their class’s CCG account and immediately impact the lives of Saint Mary’s women. “Your gifts accumulate over four years so that you can make a lasting and memorable gift to Saint Mary’s at graduation,” Herms said. “The Class of 2012 donated to the renovation of Angela Athletic facilities, which is one of the options for this year’s gift, as well as a scholarship in our class’s name.” CGC will host a table in the Spes Unica Atrium to collect gifts every morning this week from 9 a.m. to noon, Herms said. The group will sell mugs that say ‘Once a Belle, Always a Belle’ at the CGC table in the Student Center Atrium today through Friday. Tag Week BINGO will be in the West Wing of the Noble Family Dining Hall on Thursday at dinner. While gifts of all amounts are welcomed, Herms said the CGC is pushing for Tribute Gifts of $20.13 in honor of the graduating class. A Tribute Gift is a donation from a student that honors someone who helped with her Saint Mary’s education. Each tribute will be published in the Commencement edition of The Observer and the honoree will be notified by email, Herms said. “I think that [the] Class Gift Campaign is great because it allows us to recognize the gifts of past Belles by giving back to the College like they did,” Herms said. “I never realized just how much it takes to make the Saint Mary’s experience possible.” Junior Maddy Martin, Class of 2014 CGC representative, said she knows how important Tag Week is this year because of the College’s recent Capital Campaign launch to raise funds. “We are really pushing each class to give to their class gift in order to reach our goal dollar amount,” Martin said. “In regards to actual class gifts, the senior class votes at the end of their senior year where they want the gift to go to,” Martin said past classes have donated to the Spes Unica building and the restoration of the Sister Madeleva painting. The Class of 2012’s gift of more than  $20,000 was the largest class gift to date, she said. “I don’t think students realize how much it costs to keep this school running,” Martin said.  “We take for granted electricity and water bills because they are always taken care of for us. It is important for students to have this realization of just how much the College spends to keep us on campus because they are more likely to give back to the school.” Junior Lauren Bruner, Class of 2014 CGC co-chair, said although asking students for money is difficult, it is important to give back to the College. “Many students, including myself, would not be here without scholarships, which shows how vital donations are,” Bruner said. “It’s rewarding to be able to give back to the College and see your gift on campus.” Junior Jillian Fata said it is important for students to recognize the changes the College can make through the campaign.  Past gifts have gone to big project, but they have also gone directly to scholarships, meaning that a future Belle can have the same opportunities that we are fortunate enough to have every day,” Fata said. Class giving is a  important part of being a student as well as an alumna, Herms said. Last year, 7,450 alumnae and friends of the College made a gift to help with the College’s expenses. Twenty percent of the College’s budget is a result of this support, Herms said. “They contributed $10.5 million in gifts to support all aspects of our education – touching every corner of campus, from building new building), to installing wireless internet, to providing toilet paper and hand soap in our bathrooms,” Herms said. We need the help to continue providing the Saint Mary’s experience, and making a gift is a way to say thank you to all of the alumnae who have made your education possible!”,Monday marked the beginning of Saint Mary’s annual Tag Week, which aims to inform students about the costs of running the College and the importance of donations to the school. The Class Gift Campaign (CGC), a student effort led in conjunction with the Office of Annual Giving, organized the Week. Shelby Herms, Class of 2013 CGC representative, said students’ donations to the Annual Fund go to their class’s CCG account and immediately impact the lives of Saint Mary’s women. “Your gifts accumulate over four years so that you can make a lasting and memorable gift to Saint Mary’s at graduation,” Herms said. “The Class of 2012 donated to the renovation of Angela Athletic facilities, which is one of the options for this year’s gift, as well as a scholarship in our class’s name.” CGC will host a table in the Spes Unica Atrium to collect gifts every morning this week from 9 a.m. to noon, Herms said. The group will sell mugs that say ‘Once a Belle, Always a Belle’ at the CGC table in the Student Center Atrium today through Friday. Tag Week BINGO will be in the West Wing of the Noble Family Dining Hall on Thursday at dinner. While gifts of all amounts are welcomed, Herms said the CGC is pushing for Tribute Gifts of $20.13 in honor of the graduating class. A Tribute Gift is a donation from a student that honors someone who helped with her Saint Mary’s education. Each tribute will be published in the Commencement edition of The Observer and the honoree will be notified by email, Herms said. “I think that [the] Class Gift Campaign is great because it allows us to recognize the gifts of past Belles by giving back to the College like they did,” Herms said. “I never realized just how much it takes to make the Saint Mary’s experience possible.” Junior Maddy Martin, Class of 2014 CGC representative, said she knows how important Tag Week is this year because of the College’s recent Capital Campaign launch to raise funds. “We are really pushing each class to give to their class gift in order to reach our goal dollar amount,” Martin said. “In regards to actual class gifts, the senior class votes at the end of their senior year where they want the gift to go to,” Martin said past classes have donated to the Spes Unica building and the restoration of the Sister Madeleva painting. The Class of 2012’s gift of more than  $20,000 was the largest class gift to date, she said. “I don’t think students realize how much it costs to keep this school running,” Martin said.  “We take for granted electricity and water bills because they are always taken care of for us. It is important for students to have this realization of just how much the College spends to keep us on campus because they are more likely to give back to the school.” Junior Lauren Bruner, Class of 2014 CGC co-chair, said although asking students for money is difficult, it is important to give back to the College. “Many students, including myself, would not be here without scholarships, which shows how vital donations are,” Bruner said. “It’s rewarding to be able to give back to the College and see your gift on campus.” Junior Jillian Fata said it is important for students to recognize the changes the College can make through the campaign.  Past gifts have gone to big project, but they have also gone directly to scholarships, meaning that a future Belle can have the same opportunities that we are fortunate enough to have every day,” Fata said. Class giving is a  important part of being a student as well as an alumna, Herms said. Last year, 7,450 alumnae and friends of the College made a gift to help with the College’s expenses. Twenty percent of the College’s budget is a result of this support, Herms said. “They contributed $10.5 million in gifts to support all aspects of our education – touching every corner of campus, from building new building), to installing wireless internet, to providing toilet paper and hand soap in our bathrooms,” Herms said. We need the help to continue providing the Saint Mary’s experience, and making a gift is a way to say thank you to all of the alumnae who have made your education possible!”last_img read more

Nelson sweeps singles, doubles at Claremont Croquet Classic

first_img Hospice volunteers help families navigate grief and find hope – September 12, 2020 Mike MandellMike Mandell is the sports editor at The Ellsworth American and Mount Desert Islander. He began working for The American in August 2016. You can reach him via email at mmandell@ellsworthamerican.com. SOUTHWEST HARBOR — Playing in an unusually late Claremont Croquet Classic, Dave Nelson’s mastery of the sport reached a new level.This year’s edition of the tournament, which typically takes place the first full week of August, was instead held the second full week of the month. Players came from Maine and all over the country for a chance to earn a place on the Claremont’s board of champions, but after a long week of play, it was Nelson, the hometown hero, who stood above the rest.Nelson clinched the singles and doubles championships Saturday to cap off seven days of croquet by the Claremont Hotel’s Clark Point shores in Southwest Harbor. That strong showing on a gray August afternoon on Mount Desert Island marked a historic personal achievement for a player who’s been a mainstay at the Claremont for years.“This is my first time holding both of these,” Nelson told the crowd in attendance as he clutched his championship glass plates during the post-tournament awards ceremony. “I’ve never won singles and doubles in the same year before.”This is placeholder textThis is placeholder textIn doubles play, Nelson and teammate Rick Slagter had to battle through the loser’s bracket after dropping their semifinal match to Don Parker and Bob Holden. The duo bounced back, though, winning their next two matches before earning revenge on Parker and Holden to take the title.Nelson had no trouble making his way through singles play, beating Skip Strong in the quarterfinals and earning two straight wins over Slagter to book his place in the final. Surrounded by a crowd of more than 30 spectators for the championship match early Saturday afternoon, Nelson topped Parker to seal his first-ever sweep of both tournament events.With his singles win, Nelson, who is also the tournament’s organizer, claimed his eighth championship in the flight since 2007. His doubles victory was his first since he joined forces with Dave Fox in 2012 to defeat Fox’s sons, Will and John.This year marked the 43rd edition of the Claremont Classic. Next year’s tournament is scheduled for Aug. 2-8. Latest posts by Mike Mandell (see all) Biocenter_img Latest Posts Ellsworth runners compete in virtual Boston Marathon – September 16, 2020 MPA approves golf, XC, field hockey, soccer; football, volleyball moved to spring – September 10, 2020last_img read more

L.A. Dodgers gain something, give up nothing just before trade deadline

first_imgAnd they can go after Price in the winter, as a free agent, without giving up talent.Remember how Detroit won the Trade Deadline World Series last year by stealing Price from Tampa Bay? It did as much good as the Winter World Series championship is doing San Diego now.“The goal is to put yourself in position to win multiple championships,” Friedman said.The flip side is that Toronto traded unknowns to Detroit for a known in Price, and Texas did the same in getting Hamels from Philadelphia.Instead of spending money on Morse, Olivera, Matt Kemp, Dee Gordon, Chris Heisey and Brandon Beachy, we all thought Guggenheim Baseball would be paying players who would actually be Dodgers.But then Friedman was always a “buy low” guy when he was analyzing markets for a living. When money is no object, and when winning seems so imperative, it’s difficult to stay disciplined.Patience is the first casualty. Even before Thursday, the Dodgers had 47 different players, including 25 pitchers. You know that meeting that playoff teams have, to determine how to split up the money? The Dodgers might have to hold it in the left-field pavilion.The Giants have used 36 players. Maybe that’s become one of the division tiebreakers: Number of Facebook friends, by team.As the rumors flew, Friedman picked up Latos, who can become a free agent and has an excellent career WHIP of 1.175. Latos also trashed his Reds teammates after he was traded to Miami, prompting Skip Schumaker to call the deal “addition by subtraction” and causing Homer Bailey to observe, “If this were a court of law, the cross examination would go after the credibility of the witness.”Wood is a 24-year-old lefty who hasn’t distinguished himself this year. But then Johnson retrieved his career this season in Atlanta. He had 51 and 50 saves with Baltimore before losing his way, then righted himself in Atlanta and was the closer after Jason Grilli got hurt.Avilan, too, has made a turnaround. He and J.P. Howell will be a double left jab out of the bullpen, the way the Giants enjoyed using Jeremy Affeldt and Xavier Lopez.It’s nice to have inventory. Ask the Angels.They could only pick up a few well-worn left-hand-hitting outfielders because they didn’t have enough trade bait in their farm system. The restocking process is not done overnight. That’s why Josh Hamilton’s name strikes such a nerve, along with the fact that the Angels are still paying him. As mediocre as he was, they haven’t replaced him.The Angels got an up-close look at Houston’s dynamic youth this week, and then the Astros were able to leverage other kids to get Scott Kazmir, Carlos Gomez and Michael Fiers. Houston will be an AL West problem for a while, and Texas can now trot out Hamels and Yu Darvish.The Dodgers, who begin a series with the Angels tonight, are far more intriguing. Which is another way of saying you’re not sure what they’re doing, except that it’s labor-intensive. Are they mistaking activity for accomplishment? Perhaps.But Friedman, the Dodgers’ President of Baseball Operations, is definitely not disposing of tomorrow for today, a strong stand for him and Farhan Zaidi, a first-year GM running a team that hasn’t won a World Series since Ronald Reagan was president.The Dodgers got through Thursday without losing any of their A-list prospects and, really, many of their Bs, except for Hector Olivera, the second baseman who got the big bonus. He went to the Braves in that triple-decker deal that also involved the Miami Marlins.L.A. got starting pitchers Mat Latos and Alex Wood and relievers Joe Johnson and Luis Avilan, and also second base prospect Jose Peraza who, at 21, was hitting .297 for Atlanta’s Triple-A team and was considered the Braves’ best remaining prospect.The Dodgers were never giving up minor league shortstop Corey Seager or pitcher Julio Urias, but they also kept pitchers Chris Anderson, Grant Holmes and Jose DeLeon. Andrew Friedman was asked to count how many pitchers he had discussed this week.He said he wasn’t even sure he could correctly list the players he got, and got rid of, on Thursday.There were 13, including a second baseman for whom the Dodgers spent $34 million just to sign, without one plate appearance. They picked up Mike Morse and designated him for assignment. They got Brandon Arroyo, who hasn’t pitched this year, and threw him onto the 60-day disabled list. They did all that, and yet David Price and Cole Hamels, the deluxe starters whom everyone assumed could be Dodgers, went elsewhere.center_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more

Cross Country Opens 2019 Season In Omaha

first_imgStory Links The Drake University men’s and women’s cross country teams begin their 2019 season Saturday, Aug. 31, evening in Omaha, Neb.The Bulldogs will race against Creighton in their season opener on the course at Skutt Catholic High School. The women are set to race a 4-kilometer course at 6 p.m., followed by a men’s 6-kilometer race at 6:30 p.m.As always, the first competition of the season will serve as a benchmark of the team’s competitive fitness following the first week of team workouts.Drake’s men were picked second in the Missouri Valley Conference preseason poll as the team returns nine runners from last season’s team that finished third in the Valley. Those returnees include Matt Cozine, Maximilian Fridrich and Kyle Brandt, who all finished in the top 25 at the MVC Championship.Drake’s women were tabbed eighth in the Valley poll, but return a much more experienced team than they have had in recent years. Senior Olivia Rogers leads the way after taking 33rd at the Valley championship as a junior. Rachel Selva, MyKaela Cole, Millie Bretl and Elizabeth Aho also return with an additional year of experience.Following Saturday’s season opener, the team returns to competition next Friday at the University of Iowa. Print Friendly Versioncenter_img Course Map last_img read more