Dorm builds community between hall and home

first_imgLe Mans Hall has found a home in the South Bend-Mishawaka community-specifically, Hannah’s House.  The College’s largest dorm has paired up with this local organization, which provides shelter to pregnant women and new mothers. Junior Emma Derheimer, president of Le Mans Hall, said it was her goal for the year to find a service project for the women of Le Mans. “Every dorm on Saint Mary’s campus is paired up with a service agency in the community,” Derheimer said. “My board’s primary goal this year was to get more involved in the service aspect of Le Mans.” Senior Morgan Talamantes said she serves as the College’s first ministry assistant, a job that includes working as an official liaison between Hannah’s House and the Hall. She said the maternity home, originally intended for unwed teenagers, advises residents about how to raise their children and manage money. Though the women do not pay to live in the home, Hannah’s House expects them to work and contribute to the community. Talamantes said she worked with the dorm’s student board members to arrange a variety of opportunities for students to get involved with Hannah’s House. Students have participated in Mothers Support Group meetings each month, the Spaghetti Dinner fundraiser hosted by members of Hannah’s House and planning the organization’s annual Fall Festival.  Talamantes said the Hall also hosts events for the residents of Hannah’s House. During one such event, the residents painted clothes for their children. “The mothers came to [Saint Mary’s] to paint onesies and then took them home for their children,” Talamantes said.  Derheimer said last month, the dorm held a baby shower for a mother in Hannah’s House. Donations included basic necessities for the newborn and the mother. “As a social work major, I believe that we’re here to make a difference and we have the will to impact the South Bend-Mishawaka community,” Derheimer said. “We’ve shown the community beyond our campus that we do care and are interested in making an active difference.” Talamantes said both the Hall and the House benefit from working together to help these women.  “It’s been great meeting different mothers – and, of course, their babies,” Talamantes said. “We definitely learn from each other. Getting to know them builds students’ enthusiasm. We can build a community within the Hall and the home.” Students may sometimes act as role models for the members of Hannah’s House, Talamantes said.  “In a way, we show mothers that they can still fulfill their dreams,” she said. Derheimer said Saint Mary’s students can help the young mothers find ways to succeed. “We also bring support and show that that we care to give mom the feeling she is not alone. We know they want to succeed because they live there. All they need are the resources,” Derheimer said. “We can be a part of facilitating that.” Talamantes said her work with Hannah’s House has showed her the value of the partnership between the College and the organization. “Working with Hannah’s House has showed me the importance of continuing this partnership. We work well together,” Talamantes said. “I hope that once I graduate it grows into something bigger and blossoms.” Hannah’s House will celebrate its 20th anniversary by opening a new house May 10, Talamantes said. Bishop Kevin Rhoades will bless the home. Students are encouraged to attend.last_img read more

Westmoreland Coal files for bankruptcy

first_imgWestmoreland Coal files for bankruptcy FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享S&P Global Market Intelligence ($):Westmoreland Coal Co. filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection on Oct. 9 after years of attempting to deliver its balance sheet.Westmoreland entered into a restructuring support agreement with an ad hoc group of lenders that hold about 76.1% of the company’s term loan, 57.9% of its senior secured notes and 79.1% of its bridge loan, according to a company release. The company’s U.S. and Canadian operations are “cash flow positive.” Given its operations’ liquidity and its Debtor-In-Possession financing, Westmoreland anticipates continuing to operate its mines as normal without affecting output levels or reducing staff.Under its restructuring support agreement, “Westmoreland launched a business transformation aimed at significantly increasing cash flow for all operational and support areas of the business,” according to the release.The coal producer, which has focused on a mine-to-mouth strategy some thought immune to the problems affecting the rest of the coal industry, had been working to downplay the possibilities of a bankruptcy since its former CEO Kevin Paprzycki stepped down in November 2017.On April 2, Westmoreland notified investors that it may seek Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection or be subject to involuntary petition for bankruptcy and that its auditors have expressed “substantial doubt” about the company’s ability to continue as a going concern.The Nasdaq Stock Exchange halted trading of the company’s shares in late April after its share price and market value fell below listing thresholds for more than 30 days.More ($): Westmoreland Coal files for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protectionlast_img read more

Obeah, witchcraft, attempted suicide offences for judicial review

first_imgThe Attorney General’s Chambers has announced proposals to review the Summary Jurisdiction (Offences) Act after Legal Affairs Minister Basil Williams and his team met with UK consultant Peter Pursglove, who is here under the Support for the Criminal Justice System Programme (SCJSP).UK consultant Peter PursgloveAccording to a release from the Legal Affairs Ministry on Monday, Pursglove’s proposed amendments will include the decriminalisation of some current offences and the recommendation of alternatives to imprisonment in respect of certain summary offences, especially minor and non-violent crimes.The AG’s statement has indicated that crimes such as vagabondage, vagrancy, obeah, witchcraft, roguery, criminal defamation and attempted suicide are decriminalised in other countries, and such changes have not impacted negatively on public safety. It is not clear if public consultations will be carried out to determine whether or not to effect these legal changes. However, the AG’s Chambers has said these activities are intended to impact the Criminal Justice System by increasing the use of Alternative Sentencing in the Criminal Justice System.Attorney General Basil WilliamsIt was outlined that objectives will be achieved through both amendments to existing legislation and the drafting of entirely new legislation. The statement further observed that many of these referenced offences carry a sentence of imprisonment for persons found guilty.“In such cases, decriminalising the behaviour and dealing with it outside the criminal law has not resulted in any negative impact on public safety. Other offences may no longer warrant the imposition of a sentence of imprisonment, and may now be dealt with by way of fine or other non-custodial sanctions,” the AG’s Chambers noted.The Attorney General was quoted as saying that a prison sentence is usually an inappropriate sanction, especially for non-violent, minor offences. He said various alternatives have been implemented in other jurisdictions; such as bail, seizure of travel documents, periodic reporting to Police or other authorities, electronic monitoring or curfews, and conditional and suspended sentences.last_img read more