SMC gift campaign begins

first_imgThe Class Gift Campaign (CGC), a student effort led in conjunction with the Office of Annual Giving, organized the Week. Shelby Herms, Class of 2013 CGC representative, said students’ donations to the Annual Fund go to their class’s CCG account and immediately impact the lives of Saint Mary’s women. “Your gifts accumulate over four years so that you can make a lasting and memorable gift to Saint Mary’s at graduation,” Herms said. “The Class of 2012 donated to the renovation of Angela Athletic facilities, which is one of the options for this year’s gift, as well as a scholarship in our class’s name.” CGC will host a table in the Spes Unica Atrium to collect gifts every morning this week from 9 a.m. to noon, Herms said. The group will sell mugs that say ‘Once a Belle, Always a Belle’ at the CGC table in the Student Center Atrium today through Friday. Tag Week BINGO will be in the West Wing of the Noble Family Dining Hall on Thursday at dinner. While gifts of all amounts are welcomed, Herms said the CGC is pushing for Tribute Gifts of $20.13 in honor of the graduating class. A Tribute Gift is a donation from a student that honors someone who helped with her Saint Mary’s education. Each tribute will be published in the Commencement edition of The Observer and the honoree will be notified by email, Herms said. “I think that [the] Class Gift Campaign is great because it allows us to recognize the gifts of past Belles by giving back to the College like they did,” Herms said. “I never realized just how much it takes to make the Saint Mary’s experience possible.” Junior Maddy Martin, Class of 2014 CGC representative, said she knows how important Tag Week is this year because of the College’s recent Capital Campaign launch to raise funds. “We are really pushing each class to give to their class gift in order to reach our goal dollar amount,” Martin said. “In regards to actual class gifts, the senior class votes at the end of their senior year where they want the gift to go to,” Martin said past classes have donated to the Spes Unica building and the restoration of the Sister Madeleva painting. The Class of 2012’s gift of more than  $20,000 was the largest class gift to date, she said. “I don’t think students realize how much it costs to keep this school running,” Martin said.  “We take for granted electricity and water bills because they are always taken care of for us. It is important for students to have this realization of just how much the College spends to keep us on campus because they are more likely to give back to the school.” Junior Lauren Bruner, Class of 2014 CGC co-chair, said although asking students for money is difficult, it is important to give back to the College. “Many students, including myself, would not be here without scholarships, which shows how vital donations are,” Bruner said. “It’s rewarding to be able to give back to the College and see your gift on campus.” Junior Jillian Fata said it is important for students to recognize the changes the College can make through the campaign.  Past gifts have gone to big project, but they have also gone directly to scholarships, meaning that a future Belle can have the same opportunities that we are fortunate enough to have every day,” Fata said. Class giving is a  important part of being a student as well as an alumna, Herms said. Last year, 7,450 alumnae and friends of the College made a gift to help with the College’s expenses. Twenty percent of the College’s budget is a result of this support, Herms said. “They contributed $10.5 million in gifts to support all aspects of our education – touching every corner of campus, from building new building), to installing wireless internet, to providing toilet paper and hand soap in our bathrooms,” Herms said. We need the help to continue providing the Saint Mary’s experience, and making a gift is a way to say thank you to all of the alumnae who have made your education possible!”,Monday marked the beginning of Saint Mary’s annual Tag Week, which aims to inform students about the costs of running the College and the importance of donations to the school. The Class Gift Campaign (CGC), a student effort led in conjunction with the Office of Annual Giving, organized the Week. Shelby Herms, Class of 2013 CGC representative, said students’ donations to the Annual Fund go to their class’s CCG account and immediately impact the lives of Saint Mary’s women. “Your gifts accumulate over four years so that you can make a lasting and memorable gift to Saint Mary’s at graduation,” Herms said. “The Class of 2012 donated to the renovation of Angela Athletic facilities, which is one of the options for this year’s gift, as well as a scholarship in our class’s name.” CGC will host a table in the Spes Unica Atrium to collect gifts every morning this week from 9 a.m. to noon, Herms said. The group will sell mugs that say ‘Once a Belle, Always a Belle’ at the CGC table in the Student Center Atrium today through Friday. Tag Week BINGO will be in the West Wing of the Noble Family Dining Hall on Thursday at dinner. While gifts of all amounts are welcomed, Herms said the CGC is pushing for Tribute Gifts of $20.13 in honor of the graduating class. A Tribute Gift is a donation from a student that honors someone who helped with her Saint Mary’s education. Each tribute will be published in the Commencement edition of The Observer and the honoree will be notified by email, Herms said. “I think that [the] Class Gift Campaign is great because it allows us to recognize the gifts of past Belles by giving back to the College like they did,” Herms said. “I never realized just how much it takes to make the Saint Mary’s experience possible.” Junior Maddy Martin, Class of 2014 CGC representative, said she knows how important Tag Week is this year because of the College’s recent Capital Campaign launch to raise funds. “We are really pushing each class to give to their class gift in order to reach our goal dollar amount,” Martin said. “In regards to actual class gifts, the senior class votes at the end of their senior year where they want the gift to go to,” Martin said past classes have donated to the Spes Unica building and the restoration of the Sister Madeleva painting. The Class of 2012’s gift of more than  $20,000 was the largest class gift to date, she said. “I don’t think students realize how much it costs to keep this school running,” Martin said.  “We take for granted electricity and water bills because they are always taken care of for us. It is important for students to have this realization of just how much the College spends to keep us on campus because they are more likely to give back to the school.” Junior Lauren Bruner, Class of 2014 CGC co-chair, said although asking students for money is difficult, it is important to give back to the College. “Many students, including myself, would not be here without scholarships, which shows how vital donations are,” Bruner said. “It’s rewarding to be able to give back to the College and see your gift on campus.” Junior Jillian Fata said it is important for students to recognize the changes the College can make through the campaign.  Past gifts have gone to big project, but they have also gone directly to scholarships, meaning that a future Belle can have the same opportunities that we are fortunate enough to have every day,” Fata said. Class giving is a  important part of being a student as well as an alumna, Herms said. Last year, 7,450 alumnae and friends of the College made a gift to help with the College’s expenses. Twenty percent of the College’s budget is a result of this support, Herms said. “They contributed $10.5 million in gifts to support all aspects of our education – touching every corner of campus, from building new building), to installing wireless internet, to providing toilet paper and hand soap in our bathrooms,” Herms said. We need the help to continue providing the Saint Mary’s experience, and making a gift is a way to say thank you to all of the alumnae who have made your education possible!”last_img read more

Lecturer revisits controversial FDR decision

first_imgLisa Phillips, associate professor of history at Indiana State University, gave a historical account of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s wartime takeover of retail store Montgomery Ward, as part of the Higgins Lunchtime Labor Research, Advocacy & Policy series in the Notre Dame Room of LaFortune Student Center on Friday.Many of FDR’s New Deal initiatives curbed the power of corporations, which Phillips said partially led to the stock market crash of the 1920’s. This check against big business created tension between corporations and government, especially after World War II.Leading an anti-regulatory effort against FDR’s policies was Sewell Avery, then chairman of Montgomery Ward, Phillips said.“What we’ll see after the war is a huge pro-business attack on New Deal regulation,” she said. “I think Sewell Avery represents the first line of that pro-business crusade against this New Deal regulation.”Avery’s refusal to acknowledge union representation for thousands of Montgomery Ward’s employees drew the ire of FDR, who Phillips said had supported union growth throughout his presidency.“What Sewell Avery was protesting here was not only abiding by the War Labor Board’s recommendations, but he also simply didn’t want to recognize the union representing Montgomery Ward’s employees,” she said. “He was refusing the union’s existence at all.”Avery’s resistance to employee unionization and his further refusal to cooperate with FDR’s administration led to his forceful removal from Montgomery Ward, Phillips said.“FDR’s logic here is that we need to have stability in the industry, and whoever is causing the instability … [must be removed],” she said. “In this case, FDR orders the U.S. Army to remove Sewell Avery physically and take over the operations of Montgomery Ward.”Phillips said FDR had enough presidential influence and there was enough disapproval of big business to justify such extreme measures.“The reason that FDR decides to do this is because it’s war time,” she said. “FDR had enough power, and there was enough public outcry to generate this regulatory machinery.”FDR’s decision to exert presidential power through Sewell Avery’s removal from office demonstrated his fear of business interference with regulatory policies, Phillips said.“[FDR] feels that if Avery defies what the National War Labor Board’s recommendations are, then every other business owner will become emboldened as well,” she said.Despite the president’s strong message, Phillips said business owners nevertheless began to express their dissatisfaction.“They can’t run the business in a way they see fit,” she said. “They have to adhere to what the union says, and they have to agree to what the government is telling them to do in terms of regulating the conditions of wages and work.”Phillips said businessmen challenged FDR’s New Deal policies by launching public campaigns and lobbying efforts.“Part of what the business community was doing was to convince the American public that business was the epitome of American democracy in that it needed to spread worldwide,” she said. “[The business community] literally took on an ad campaign through advertising to convey this particular message.“Campaign finance reform, taxes, tax structure, all of these things, I think, were bolstered through these networks of businessmen.”Tags: FDR, Higgins Lunchtime Labor RAPS, Montgomery Ward, New Deal, Sewell Averylast_img read more

TEXTING PARENTS ABOUT TESTS AND HOMEWORK CAN IMPROVE MATHS RESULTS AND ABSENTEEISM

first_imgHelping parents to engage in their child’s learning by texting them about upcoming tests or homework deadlines can boost secondary school pupils’ maths results by the equivalent of an extra month in the classroom, according to the results of a new trial published by the Education Endowment Foundation (EEF) .Almost 16,000 students in 36 English secondary schools took part in the randomised controlled trial of the Parent Engagement Project, delivered by researchers from the University of Bristol and Harvard University.Parents were sent an average of 30 texts over one school year (roughly one per week) with content ranging from dates of upcoming tests and warnings about missed homework, to conversation prompts on what their child had learnt that day. The independent evaluators from Queen’s University Belfast found that pupils receiving the intervention made an additional month’s progress in maths compared with a similar group whose parents didn’t get the texts. Absenteeism was reduced too.They reported that schools embraced the programme and a vast majority of parents were supportive of the programme including the content, frequency and timing of texts.Pupils receiving the intervention made an additional month’s progress in mathsPrevious research has shown that while parental engagement is an effective way of improving attainment, little is known about how to do this successfully – and, in particular, how to reach parents whose own experiences of schools were not positive.At a maximum cost to schools of just £6 per pupil across the school year, today’s results suggest that texting parents could be a straightforward and cost-effective way of improving attainment through parental engagement. The approach is likely to be even cheaper than this as most schools will already have the required texting software and messages can be free if parents have downloaded the relevant software (which is also free) onto their smartphones. Evaluations of two more trials designed to find out what does and doesn’t work when it comes to engaging parents, are also published by the EEF today. In contrast to the light-touch approach of the Parent Engagement Project, both aimed to engage parents through face-to-face programmes:Parent Academy, delivered by researchers from the University of Chicago and evaluated by NatCen, offered parents the opportunity to participate in 12 classes over the course of an academic year. The sessions were designed to equip them with the skills to support their child’s learning in numeracy and literacy.SPOKES (Supporting Parents on Kids’ Education in Schools),delivered by Plymouth Parent Partnership and the University of Oxford, and evaluated by the Institute for Effective Education, gaveparents of five and six year old struggling readers ten group sessions to help them support their children’s learning at home.Both independent evaluations reported that, for a number of different reasons, the interventions struggled to persuade parents to attend regularly. While they did not find evidence of impact for all children, both delivered valuable findings.One of the aims of the Parenting Academy trialwas to find out whether financial incentives could be successful in changing parents’ behaviours and improving their attendance. Some of the parents were paid Stg£30 to attend each session. For these parents, attendance was much higher, suggesting that financial incentives may be an effective way to engage and retain parents in interventions of this type.Although the evaluation of SPOKES didn’t find an overall improvement in reading scores for all children of parents who attended, there were some promising results for boys, and for all children on some broader, longer-term measures. This could mean that the programme is effective for boys in particular, or for all children in terms of Key Stage 1 literacy scores. The EEF will investigate this further and report again next year.Sir Kevan Collins, Chief Executive of the Education Endowment Foundation, said: “We know that it can be very difficult to get parents more involved, particularly when their children get older. It would seem that the simple and cheap approach of regular texts could be a better bet for schools than expecting parents to turn up at school for classes of their own.”Also published were the results of another large-scale randomised controlled trial, the first designed to find out if taking part in groups like the Scout Association, Sea Cadets or St John Ambulance can have an impact on exam results as well as on wider life skills.” Delivered by the Youth United Foundation, 7,781 children in 71 schools took part in this trial of Youth Social Action. The evaluators from Durham University found that the students benefited from a small positive impact in reported skills such as self-confidence and teamwork. They found no evidence that there was any benefit for academic skills, but problems with the quality of data means that this result is not conclusive.Sir Peter Lampl. Chairman of the Education Endowment Foundation and of the Sutton Trust, said: “We know that your chances of doing well in life are only partially shaped by your academic attainment, essential life skills such as confidence, articulacy, working with others and social skills play a crucial role. Yet we know very little about how to develop these attributes in children. “There is a belief that taking part in activities like Scouts helps to build the essential skills young people increasingly need to be successful in life, so it is encouraging to see that the young people taking part in the trial of Youth Social Action which include Sea Cadets, Fire Cadets and Scouts reported an increase in their confidence and team-working skills.”TEXTING PARENTS ABOUT TESTS AND HOMEWORK CAN IMPROVE MATHS RESULTS AND ABSENTEEISM was last modified: July 15th, 2016 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more