Skateworld Rally in Linda Vista

Skateworld Rally in Linda Vista

first_imgSkateworld Rally in Linda Vista Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI)- KUSI’s John Soderman was at the Skateworld Rally in Linda Vista, where locals are trying to save the rink before City Council votes tomorrow on the fate of the roller rink April 7, 2019 Updated: 6:25 PMcenter_img KUSI Newsroom KUSI Newsroom, Posted: April 7, 2019last_img read more

Norways wealth fund to sue Volkswagen over emissions scandal

first_imgNorway’s sovereign wealth fund, the world’s largest, said on Sunday it plans to join the class-action lawsuits filed against Volkswagen AG over the German automaker’s emissions scandal.”Norges Bank Investment Management intends to join a legal action against Volkswagen arising out of that the company provided incorrect emissions data,” Marthe Skaar, the fund’s spokeswoman, said in a statement emailed to Reuters.”We have been advised by our lawyers that the company’s conduct gives rise to legal claims under German law. As an investor, it is our responsibility to safeguard the fund’s holding in Volkswagen,” Skaar added.The legal action would take place in Germany, a separate fund spokesman told Reuters, declining to give details as to when it would happen.The Financial Times on Sunday first reported the sovereign fund’s plan to sue Volkswagen.The $850 billion oil fund is expected in the coming weeks to join the class-action lawsuits filed against Volkswagen in German courts in the coming weeks, the newspaper said.Volkswagen, which admitted last year that it had used sophisticated secret software in its cars to cheat exhaust emissions tests, was unavailable for comment outside regular business hours.Norway’s wealth fund said last year that Volkswagen’s actions had contributed to a loss of 4.9 billion crowns in the fund’s second quarter.The car maker reached a nearly $10 billion deal with the U.S. government last month to buy back or fix about a half million of its diesel cars and set up environmental and consumer compensation funds.Norway’s wealth fund also recently turned up the heat on U.S. oil companies Exxon Mobil and Chevron to do more to report on the risks of climate change.The fund, itself built from Norway’s oil and gas wealth, had also made similar demands of oil firms worldwide.last_img read more

Melania Trump To Accept White House Christmas Tree On Monday

Melania Trump To Accept White House Christmas Tree On Monday

first_img Share Twitter User @GMAChristmas is coming to Donald Trump’s White House a bit early this year.Melania Trump is set to accept the official White House Christmas tree on Monday. First ladies typically receive the tree on the Friday after Thanksgiving, but the Trumps are expected to spend the holiday at their home in Palm Beach, Florida.Jim and Diane Chapman, owners of a Wisconsin Christmas tree farm, won a contest run by the National Christmas Tree Association and will get to present the tree to the first lady.The 19 1/2-foot Balsam fir will go on display in the White House Blue Room.The Christmas Tree Association says the Chapmans also presented trees to the White House in 1998 and 2003.last_img read more

AIs Emmy award goes to Swarmanoid robot book heist

AIs Emmy award goes to Swarmanoid robot book heist

first_imgImage credit: swarmanoid.org This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: AI’s Emmy award goes to Swarmanoid robot book heist (2011, August 16) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-08-ai-emmy-award-swarmanoid-robot.html (PhysOrg.com) — Robots removing a book off a shelf? Hardly what you would consider worthy of a video award. Not unless you’re talking about a special platoon of robots known as a swarmanoid. Their book heist actually won the “Oscars” of the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence (AAAI) Video Competition 2011 last week. Spy-thriller music, a Hitchcock-like hum of mosquitoes, and a menacing whir-sound of blades did nothing to deter excitement, but the technical construct and techniques of these little snap-in, snap-out robots are interesting even without special effects. A swarmanoid is a robot “swarm” made up of three characters: the eye-bots (they fly and stick to ceilings with magnets, loiter and send info to other robots) and hand-bots (they climb and manipulate objects) and foot-bots (wheeled robots capable of connecting to the other types as well as amongst themselves, moving in a horizontal roll). The three are like a fire brigade or any search and rescue mission team in that they have discrete tasking abilities but they can also connect when needed.The foot-bots are 17 cm diameter x 29 cm, 1.8 kg; the hand-bots are 38 x 44 x 30 cm; and the flying eye-bots are 50 cm in diameter, with an endurance of 10 to 20 minutes. © 2011 PhysOrg.com Toyota’s musical robots (w/ Video) Explore further The award-winning video shows how a swarmanoid teams up to identify a book, walks over to the shelf where the book is located, and then climbs the wall to get it, with each of the three characters doing its respective task.The eye-bot identifies the target book and the foot-bots are summoned. They roll over to the target area, and release the hand-bot, which climbs to the ceiling and gets the book.The “swarm” in “swarmanoid” helps explain the fundamental concept. Swarm robotics was inspired by social aspects of insect behavior. The film, and the robots, are the result of a research undertaking called the Swarmanoid Project, funded by the European Commission, with a stated objective of design, implementation and control of a novel distributed robotic system. Dr. Marco Dorigo is the developer of the project and its coordinator. He was awarded in November 2007 with the “CajAstur International Prize for Soft Computing.”According to the New Scientist, Dorigo and his colleagues have gathered an army of 30 foot-bots, 10 eye-bots and eight hand-bots. According to the Swarmanoid site, the Swarmanoid project started in 2006 and ended in September 30 2010. Nonetheless, the Swarmanoid team looks ahead toward future incarnations from the present groundwork. The film narration refers to future possibilities where swarmanoids could play a role in (1) replacing humans in dangerous situations (2) performing search-and-rescue missions and (3) interplanetary explorations.last_img read more