Hughton Decisions favored Liverpool

Hughton Decisions favored Liverpool

first_imgBrighton manager Chris Hughton felt that the bulk of decisions went Liverpool’s way in their 1-0 home defeat to the league leaders.Mo Salah converted from the spot to give Liverpool a crucial 1-0 win at Brighton after the Egyptian was judged to have been fouled by Pascal Gross.Hughton, however, had no complaints about the penalty but believes that plenty other decisions favored them.“There’s no intent and referees have a hard job, but sometimes you feel things go your way and sometimes you feel some of the decisions don’t go your way,” Hughton told Sky Sports.“I felt today it was one of those days. No malice or anything towards the referee but I thought the bulk of decisions favored Liverpool today.Roberto Firmino, LiverpoolVirgil van Dijk praises Roberto Firmino after Liverpool’s win Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Virgil van Dijk hailed team-mate Roberto Firmino after coming off the bench to inspire Liverpool to a 3-1 comeback win against Newcastle United.“On the balance of play, I thought we deserved something.“They are such a good side and the opportunities they had were when we were trying to get back into the game and put bodies forward and made the game a bit more open. I thought we restricted them to minimal chances.“Pascal Gross’ chance [a shot in the second half] was probably as good as any of their chances.“We were always in the game and discipline was really good from the team, which it has to be because they can open you up.“In the latter part of the game we went for it a bit and showed a real intent to get back on level terms and I thought for the feel of the game that we deserved something.”last_img read more

Texas Monthly Pledges Subscription Proceeds to Harvey Relief

Texas Monthly Pledges Subscription Proceeds to Harvey Relief

first_img“This isn’t abstract for us—we have had members of our family affected,” says Taliaferro. “These people aren’t just our readers, they are our neighbors and friends.”He also notes that because the team considers itself the national magazine of Texas, in addition to Harvey being a national emergency, they felt it was imperative to help raise money for relief efforts. Thus, they looked to their main product, which is their magazine subscription, as the place to get started.In addition to helping raise money for relief efforts through subscription proceeds, the Texas Monthly team has been actively reporting on Harvey and how it’s affecting Texans.“We have the whole team deployed. We sent reporters to the coast, to Beaumont, to shelters in Dallas and Austin,” he says. “They’ve been on boats and in jacked up trucks. We have reporters and editors in Houston filing stories while trying to keep their homes dry.”Taliaferro says the team is committed to telling people’s stories, going across the state at “a moment when the world needs to see and understand the scale of the devastation.”“It’s also perhaps worth noting that what has been the most read work has been our guide to helping people,” he adds. “It’s been one of the most read stories we’ve ever done.”The Texas Monthly team plans to donate money to organizations working in Texas that will have the greatest impact. Taliaferro says that the decision on where to donate the money will also arise after they calculate how much money they’ve raised.“We are in discussions with several groups right now working in Houston and around the gulf coast region,” says Taliaferro. “Our priority is that the dollars go to real people to help with real problems, and there will almost surely be issues that pop up where dollars are urgently needed. We are watching that closely and hope to have a decision made once we have a firmer idea of how much money we are talking about.”As a result of Harvey’s massive impact, the Texas Monthly team has decided to forgo its ideas for its former October issue, which goes to press next week. They plan to focus the issue primarily on Harvey and its effects.In addition, Texas Monthly is going to match up to $20,000 in donations, and the proceeds will go to @FeedingTexas.— Texas Monthly (@TexasMonthly) August 31, 2017 In the face of the catastrophic devastation that faces Texas and Louisiana after Hurricane Harvey, Texas Monthly announced last night that it plans to donate 100 percent of its new subscription proceeds (for the 24-hour period following the announcement) to relief efforts, closing at midnight Thursday night.But now, after raising $7,500 (about 370 subscriptions), Taliaferro, editor-in-chief, tells Folio: they’re opening the time window for another week, and matching up to $20,000 in donations.The monthly magazine, headquartered in downtown Austin, initially made the announcement on its website and social media accounts.Taliaferro, who began his role late last year, says that the Texas Monthly team wanted to do something beyond covering the storm and its effects, so they made the decision to donate subscription proceeds to relief efforts.last_img read more

Norways wealth fund to sue Volkswagen over emissions scandal

first_imgNorway’s sovereign wealth fund, the world’s largest, said on Sunday it plans to join the class-action lawsuits filed against Volkswagen AG over the German automaker’s emissions scandal.”Norges Bank Investment Management intends to join a legal action against Volkswagen arising out of that the company provided incorrect emissions data,” Marthe Skaar, the fund’s spokeswoman, said in a statement emailed to Reuters.”We have been advised by our lawyers that the company’s conduct gives rise to legal claims under German law. As an investor, it is our responsibility to safeguard the fund’s holding in Volkswagen,” Skaar added.The legal action would take place in Germany, a separate fund spokesman told Reuters, declining to give details as to when it would happen.The Financial Times on Sunday first reported the sovereign fund’s plan to sue Volkswagen.The $850 billion oil fund is expected in the coming weeks to join the class-action lawsuits filed against Volkswagen in German courts in the coming weeks, the newspaper said.Volkswagen, which admitted last year that it had used sophisticated secret software in its cars to cheat exhaust emissions tests, was unavailable for comment outside regular business hours.Norway’s wealth fund said last year that Volkswagen’s actions had contributed to a loss of 4.9 billion crowns in the fund’s second quarter.The car maker reached a nearly $10 billion deal with the U.S. government last month to buy back or fix about a half million of its diesel cars and set up environmental and consumer compensation funds.Norway’s wealth fund also recently turned up the heat on U.S. oil companies Exxon Mobil and Chevron to do more to report on the risks of climate change.The fund, itself built from Norway’s oil and gas wealth, had also made similar demands of oil firms worldwide.last_img read more

Melania Trump To Accept White House Christmas Tree On Monday

Melania Trump To Accept White House Christmas Tree On Monday

first_img Share Twitter User @GMAChristmas is coming to Donald Trump’s White House a bit early this year.Melania Trump is set to accept the official White House Christmas tree on Monday. First ladies typically receive the tree on the Friday after Thanksgiving, but the Trumps are expected to spend the holiday at their home in Palm Beach, Florida.Jim and Diane Chapman, owners of a Wisconsin Christmas tree farm, won a contest run by the National Christmas Tree Association and will get to present the tree to the first lady.The 19 1/2-foot Balsam fir will go on display in the White House Blue Room.The Christmas Tree Association says the Chapmans also presented trees to the White House in 1998 and 2003.last_img read more

Clyde Johnson Smith Broke Racial Barriers in Baltimore Fire Department

Clyde Johnson Smith Broke Racial Barriers in Baltimore Fire Department

first_imgClyde Johnson Smith, who became the first Black academy instructor with the Baltimore City Fire Department, died May 7 at the age of 84. The cause was cancer and he died at the Gilchrist Hospice in Baltimore, surrounded by family and friends.Smith was born December 5, 1932 in segregated Greenwood, South Carolina. He was the oldest of three boys and at an early age he moved to Baltimore and lived with an aunt in the Cherry Hill community.Clyde Johnson Smith (Courtesy Photo)Smith attended Frederick Douglass High School where he played football and ran track. He later entered the United States Army and served as a paratrooper in the 82nd Airborne Division. He was honorably discharged in 1955.After leaving the Army, Smith attended what was then Morgan State College, but interrupted his time at Morgan to join the Baltimore City Fire Department in 1959, just a few years after the department was officially integrated. In addition to becoming the department’s first Black academy instructor, Smith was also the BCFD’s first Black battalion chief, and the first Black assistant chief.According to his wife, Barbara R. Smith (the couple was married more than 50 years), Smith, along with 10 Black colleagues, traveled to a conference about discrimination throughout the United States Fire Service, in New York City in 1969.  Those men were instrumental in creating the International Association of Black Professional Firefighters (IABPFF), an organization that has grown to over 95 chapters throughout the United States, the Caribbean and the United Kingdom. When Smith and his colleagues returned from the conference in 1969, The Vulcan Blazers, which represents Baltimore’s Black firefighters, was born.Smith is survived by his wife Barbara; son Clyde William Smith; daughter, Lori Slade; brother, Ronald (Hattie) Smith and many other family members and friends.last_img read more