Campus celebrates Christian Unity Week

first_imgChristian Unity Week, a series of events hosted by Campus Ministry and the Department of Theology, works to help students and staff embark on a communal journey to come together in the Body of Christ through conversation and prayer. “About 2.1 billion people claim the name Christian, but these followers of Christ are divided into a wide variety of denominations,” Karen Kirner, associate director of the Folk and Celebration Choirs, said. “Different ways we can work towards unity include prayer, common work, witness and open dialogue.” Events for the week begin tonight with an Ecumenical Lecture concerning Eastern Catholics and their relationship with the Orthodox Church at 7 p.m. in the Coleman-Morse Lounge. A talk sponsored by Four:7 Catholic Fellowship about unification of all Christians through the Body of Christ will take place Tuesday at 8:30 p.m. in the Cavanaugh Hall Chapel. History professors Mark Noll and Brad Gregory will lecture on the relationship between Evangelicals and Catholics Wednesday at 7 p.m. in the Oak Room of South Dining Hall. Though there will be a prayer service at 8 p.m. Friday in the Keenan-Stanford Chapel, the pinnacle of the week will be the Christian Unity Prayer Service Thursday night at 10 p.m. in the Basilica of the Sacred Heart, Kirner said. Kirner has helped organize several choirs for the Prayer Service. Five choirs from across campus will be leading the music, including the Celebration Choir, Voices of Faith Gospel Choir, Totus Tuus Band of Four: 7 Catholic Fellowship, musicians from Iron Sharpens Iron Interdenominational Fellowship and Coro Primavera. “Each group will be highlighted individually, and we’ll also sing several joint pieces together,” she said. It’s important that members of the Notre Dame community share in all the similarities of Christian faith, have a chance to dialogue about differences with others and appreciate the nuances that each has to offer, Kirner said. An easy way to participate is to attend the Thursday night prayer service in the Basilica, she said. The organizers of Christian Unity Week hope, that with the time spent examining beliefs, all Christians can unite as one people. “We want students to realize that Christian Unity is something worth celebrating and working toward, even though we probably won’t see it brought completely to fruition in our lifetimes,” Kirner said. “We want students to appreciate the validity of a wide variety of Christian expression, to be inspired by fellow students of different Christian expressions, to learn from each other, and primarily to realize that we are all one in Christ.”last_img read more

Saint Mary’s student earns Gates scholarship

first_imgSaint Mary’s freshman Clarisa Medina stands at 4-foot-11 but her short stature does not hinder her plans for a big future.  “There’s not a doubt in my mind that I’m going to be successful,” she said.  In May 2012, Medina found out she was accepted to become a Gates Millennium Scholar. Of the 26,000 high school seniors who applied for the distinguished scholarship, she was one of the lucky 1,000.  “Students apply annually from all U.S. territories and states.” Medina said. “The program is more prestigious than any university’s admission process, including Harvard.”  Medina applied online in December 2011 and wrote nine essays discussing community service, activities she engaged in during her weekends and summers and the type of courses she had taken to prepare herself for college.  “We also had to write about things that have happened in our lives that we had to overcome to get to the point where we want to be, she said. “There are three rounds and in the final round they determine if you can become a Gates Scholar based off of socio-economic need. If you are chosen you get up to 10 years of education at any university of our choice.”  Medina is the first Gates Millennium Scholar to enroll at Saint Mary’s College. The financial aid office had never heard of the scholarship before Medina.   Medina was first introduced to Saint Mary’s through her sister and current sophomore, Cecily Medina.  “She loved it so much here and she strongly encouraged me to come,” Medina said.  “When I came to visit I liked the classroom size, it was very appealing to me. I feel as if I have so many opportunities here. I get to double major and go abroad. It’s the ideal place to master the basics and go on to a higher level of education, perhaps a PhD.”  Medina, a double major in global studies and political science intends to minor in justice education and Spanish as well as earn her MBA from Notre Dame during her last year of college.  Medina finds another advantage of Saint Mary’s is her ability to participate in two different sports. “I run cross country and play softball here,” she said. “It’s a great stress reliever for me and my team provides me with an additional support system.” The second of eight children, Medina relies on her sports family to help her transition from her home environment. “It is really difficult coming from a Hispanic family because we are very close knit and dependent on each other,” she said. “It’s so loud at home and here everything has been pretty quiet. I know I just have to remind myself to sacrificed that for a reason and that reason was to get an education and to have an opportunity that my parents never had.”  “I am very proud of [Clarisa],” Cecily Medina said. “When she won the scholarship it wasn’t just her winning, it was our entire family winning.”  Despite engaging in an enriched athletic and academic life, Medina has not forgotten her background in service. “I plan to open a camp here that I created back home,” Medina said. “It’s called Run the World and I believe that it is the reason why I got the Gates Scholarship.” Contact Rebecca O’Neil at roneil01@saintmarys.edulast_img read more

SMC gift campaign begins

first_imgThe Class Gift Campaign (CGC), a student effort led in conjunction with the Office of Annual Giving, organized the Week. Shelby Herms, Class of 2013 CGC representative, said students’ donations to the Annual Fund go to their class’s CCG account and immediately impact the lives of Saint Mary’s women. “Your gifts accumulate over four years so that you can make a lasting and memorable gift to Saint Mary’s at graduation,” Herms said. “The Class of 2012 donated to the renovation of Angela Athletic facilities, which is one of the options for this year’s gift, as well as a scholarship in our class’s name.” CGC will host a table in the Spes Unica Atrium to collect gifts every morning this week from 9 a.m. to noon, Herms said. The group will sell mugs that say ‘Once a Belle, Always a Belle’ at the CGC table in the Student Center Atrium today through Friday. Tag Week BINGO will be in the West Wing of the Noble Family Dining Hall on Thursday at dinner. While gifts of all amounts are welcomed, Herms said the CGC is pushing for Tribute Gifts of $20.13 in honor of the graduating class. A Tribute Gift is a donation from a student that honors someone who helped with her Saint Mary’s education. Each tribute will be published in the Commencement edition of The Observer and the honoree will be notified by email, Herms said. “I think that [the] Class Gift Campaign is great because it allows us to recognize the gifts of past Belles by giving back to the College like they did,” Herms said. “I never realized just how much it takes to make the Saint Mary’s experience possible.” Junior Maddy Martin, Class of 2014 CGC representative, said she knows how important Tag Week is this year because of the College’s recent Capital Campaign launch to raise funds. “We are really pushing each class to give to their class gift in order to reach our goal dollar amount,” Martin said. “In regards to actual class gifts, the senior class votes at the end of their senior year where they want the gift to go to,” Martin said past classes have donated to the Spes Unica building and the restoration of the Sister Madeleva painting. The Class of 2012’s gift of more than  $20,000 was the largest class gift to date, she said. “I don’t think students realize how much it costs to keep this school running,” Martin said.  “We take for granted electricity and water bills because they are always taken care of for us. It is important for students to have this realization of just how much the College spends to keep us on campus because they are more likely to give back to the school.” Junior Lauren Bruner, Class of 2014 CGC co-chair, said although asking students for money is difficult, it is important to give back to the College. “Many students, including myself, would not be here without scholarships, which shows how vital donations are,” Bruner said. “It’s rewarding to be able to give back to the College and see your gift on campus.” Junior Jillian Fata said it is important for students to recognize the changes the College can make through the campaign.  Past gifts have gone to big project, but they have also gone directly to scholarships, meaning that a future Belle can have the same opportunities that we are fortunate enough to have every day,” Fata said. Class giving is a  important part of being a student as well as an alumna, Herms said. Last year, 7,450 alumnae and friends of the College made a gift to help with the College’s expenses. Twenty percent of the College’s budget is a result of this support, Herms said. “They contributed $10.5 million in gifts to support all aspects of our education – touching every corner of campus, from building new building), to installing wireless internet, to providing toilet paper and hand soap in our bathrooms,” Herms said. We need the help to continue providing the Saint Mary’s experience, and making a gift is a way to say thank you to all of the alumnae who have made your education possible!”,Monday marked the beginning of Saint Mary’s annual Tag Week, which aims to inform students about the costs of running the College and the importance of donations to the school. The Class Gift Campaign (CGC), a student effort led in conjunction with the Office of Annual Giving, organized the Week. Shelby Herms, Class of 2013 CGC representative, said students’ donations to the Annual Fund go to their class’s CCG account and immediately impact the lives of Saint Mary’s women. “Your gifts accumulate over four years so that you can make a lasting and memorable gift to Saint Mary’s at graduation,” Herms said. “The Class of 2012 donated to the renovation of Angela Athletic facilities, which is one of the options for this year’s gift, as well as a scholarship in our class’s name.” CGC will host a table in the Spes Unica Atrium to collect gifts every morning this week from 9 a.m. to noon, Herms said. The group will sell mugs that say ‘Once a Belle, Always a Belle’ at the CGC table in the Student Center Atrium today through Friday. Tag Week BINGO will be in the West Wing of the Noble Family Dining Hall on Thursday at dinner. While gifts of all amounts are welcomed, Herms said the CGC is pushing for Tribute Gifts of $20.13 in honor of the graduating class. A Tribute Gift is a donation from a student that honors someone who helped with her Saint Mary’s education. Each tribute will be published in the Commencement edition of The Observer and the honoree will be notified by email, Herms said. “I think that [the] Class Gift Campaign is great because it allows us to recognize the gifts of past Belles by giving back to the College like they did,” Herms said. “I never realized just how much it takes to make the Saint Mary’s experience possible.” Junior Maddy Martin, Class of 2014 CGC representative, said she knows how important Tag Week is this year because of the College’s recent Capital Campaign launch to raise funds. “We are really pushing each class to give to their class gift in order to reach our goal dollar amount,” Martin said. “In regards to actual class gifts, the senior class votes at the end of their senior year where they want the gift to go to,” Martin said past classes have donated to the Spes Unica building and the restoration of the Sister Madeleva painting. The Class of 2012’s gift of more than  $20,000 was the largest class gift to date, she said. “I don’t think students realize how much it costs to keep this school running,” Martin said.  “We take for granted electricity and water bills because they are always taken care of for us. It is important for students to have this realization of just how much the College spends to keep us on campus because they are more likely to give back to the school.” Junior Lauren Bruner, Class of 2014 CGC co-chair, said although asking students for money is difficult, it is important to give back to the College. “Many students, including myself, would not be here without scholarships, which shows how vital donations are,” Bruner said. “It’s rewarding to be able to give back to the College and see your gift on campus.” Junior Jillian Fata said it is important for students to recognize the changes the College can make through the campaign.  Past gifts have gone to big project, but they have also gone directly to scholarships, meaning that a future Belle can have the same opportunities that we are fortunate enough to have every day,” Fata said. Class giving is a  important part of being a student as well as an alumna, Herms said. Last year, 7,450 alumnae and friends of the College made a gift to help with the College’s expenses. Twenty percent of the College’s budget is a result of this support, Herms said. “They contributed $10.5 million in gifts to support all aspects of our education – touching every corner of campus, from building new building), to installing wireless internet, to providing toilet paper and hand soap in our bathrooms,” Herms said. We need the help to continue providing the Saint Mary’s experience, and making a gift is a way to say thank you to all of the alumnae who have made your education possible!”last_img read more

Dorm builds community between hall and home

first_imgLe Mans Hall has found a home in the South Bend-Mishawaka community-specifically, Hannah’s House.  The College’s largest dorm has paired up with this local organization, which provides shelter to pregnant women and new mothers. Junior Emma Derheimer, president of Le Mans Hall, said it was her goal for the year to find a service project for the women of Le Mans. “Every dorm on Saint Mary’s campus is paired up with a service agency in the community,” Derheimer said. “My board’s primary goal this year was to get more involved in the service aspect of Le Mans.” Senior Morgan Talamantes said she serves as the College’s first ministry assistant, a job that includes working as an official liaison between Hannah’s House and the Hall. She said the maternity home, originally intended for unwed teenagers, advises residents about how to raise their children and manage money. Though the women do not pay to live in the home, Hannah’s House expects them to work and contribute to the community. Talamantes said she worked with the dorm’s student board members to arrange a variety of opportunities for students to get involved with Hannah’s House. Students have participated in Mothers Support Group meetings each month, the Spaghetti Dinner fundraiser hosted by members of Hannah’s House and planning the organization’s annual Fall Festival.  Talamantes said the Hall also hosts events for the residents of Hannah’s House. During one such event, the residents painted clothes for their children. “The mothers came to [Saint Mary’s] to paint onesies and then took them home for their children,” Talamantes said.  Derheimer said last month, the dorm held a baby shower for a mother in Hannah’s House. Donations included basic necessities for the newborn and the mother. “As a social work major, I believe that we’re here to make a difference and we have the will to impact the South Bend-Mishawaka community,” Derheimer said. “We’ve shown the community beyond our campus that we do care and are interested in making an active difference.” Talamantes said both the Hall and the House benefit from working together to help these women.  “It’s been great meeting different mothers – and, of course, their babies,” Talamantes said. “We definitely learn from each other. Getting to know them builds students’ enthusiasm. We can build a community within the Hall and the home.” Students may sometimes act as role models for the members of Hannah’s House, Talamantes said.  “In a way, we show mothers that they can still fulfill their dreams,” she said. Derheimer said Saint Mary’s students can help the young mothers find ways to succeed. “We also bring support and show that that we care to give mom the feeling she is not alone. We know they want to succeed because they live there. All they need are the resources,” Derheimer said. “We can be a part of facilitating that.” Talamantes said her work with Hannah’s House has showed her the value of the partnership between the College and the organization. “Working with Hannah’s House has showed me the importance of continuing this partnership. We work well together,” Talamantes said. “I hope that once I graduate it grows into something bigger and blossoms.” Hannah’s House will celebrate its 20th anniversary by opening a new house May 10, Talamantes said. Bishop Kevin Rhoades will bless the home. Students are encouraged to attend.last_img read more

Students run 5k to fight homelessness

first_imgA group of Saint Mary’s students, faculty and administrators participated in the Homeward Bound 5K for St. Joseph County on Saturday. The Homeward Bound run/walk contributed to local organizations to fight homelessness and provide housing.Saint Mary’s Student Government Sssociation (SGA), organized a group of more than 40 members of the Saint Mary’s community to participate in the event. Saint Mary’s senior Kat Sullivan, who organized the event, said it was fun to dress up as superheroes and help local organizations.“We’re supposed to represent the superheroes of South Bend, the organizations that really give back to the community, so we were representing Center for the Homeless and Hannah’s House, so all the funds that we raised will go to those organizations,” Sullivan said.Duane Wilson, chair of Homeward Bound for St. Joseph County, said this is the seventh annual Homeward Bound 5K in St. Joseph County and the third year the Robinson Community Learning Center has hosted the event.“The Homeward Bound 5K is to bring awareness and raise funds for affordable housing and to support the homeless,” Wilson said. “Last year we raised $16,000 and [the money] gets divided up between five agencies that support the needs of homelessness, specifically Bridges out of Poverty, Habitat for Humanity, Hannah’s House, Center for the Homeless, Hope Ministries and the Robinson Community Learning Center.”First year student Elizabeth Chandler said she had a great time participating in the race with her friends and was happy she could contribute to helping Hannah’s House and Center for the Homeless.“The Homeward Bound was my first 5K I’ve ever done, and it felt so great knowing I not only completed this race, but I also helped fight homelessness and poverty,” Chandler said. “It was a really rewarding experience”.First year student Maureen Daday dressed up as Batman.“I thought the atmosphere was awesome because everyone was so excited to help the local organizations in South Bend,” Daday said. “People from Saint Mary’s really wanted to help out, and it was cool seeing all the students come together and run for a good cause, I will definitely participate in the Homeward Bound next year.”Bethel College, Notre Dame, Holy Cross and Saint Mary’s were asked to form groups for the event. Senior Kat Sullivan said that participating in events that benefit local organizations have made her realize how important it is to give back to the community.“I see firsthand what the Center can do for the South Bend community by working with the guests at the Center for the Homeless, so I realize how important events like the Homeward Bound 5K are,” Sullivan said. “… These organizations do so much for the South Bend community, and it’s important for us to give back.”Tags: Homeward Boundlast_img read more

Lecturer revisits controversial FDR decision

first_imgLisa Phillips, associate professor of history at Indiana State University, gave a historical account of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s wartime takeover of retail store Montgomery Ward, as part of the Higgins Lunchtime Labor Research, Advocacy & Policy series in the Notre Dame Room of LaFortune Student Center on Friday.Many of FDR’s New Deal initiatives curbed the power of corporations, which Phillips said partially led to the stock market crash of the 1920’s. This check against big business created tension between corporations and government, especially after World War II.Leading an anti-regulatory effort against FDR’s policies was Sewell Avery, then chairman of Montgomery Ward, Phillips said.“What we’ll see after the war is a huge pro-business attack on New Deal regulation,” she said. “I think Sewell Avery represents the first line of that pro-business crusade against this New Deal regulation.”Avery’s refusal to acknowledge union representation for thousands of Montgomery Ward’s employees drew the ire of FDR, who Phillips said had supported union growth throughout his presidency.“What Sewell Avery was protesting here was not only abiding by the War Labor Board’s recommendations, but he also simply didn’t want to recognize the union representing Montgomery Ward’s employees,” she said. “He was refusing the union’s existence at all.”Avery’s resistance to employee unionization and his further refusal to cooperate with FDR’s administration led to his forceful removal from Montgomery Ward, Phillips said.“FDR’s logic here is that we need to have stability in the industry, and whoever is causing the instability … [must be removed],” she said. “In this case, FDR orders the U.S. Army to remove Sewell Avery physically and take over the operations of Montgomery Ward.”Phillips said FDR had enough presidential influence and there was enough disapproval of big business to justify such extreme measures.“The reason that FDR decides to do this is because it’s war time,” she said. “FDR had enough power, and there was enough public outcry to generate this regulatory machinery.”FDR’s decision to exert presidential power through Sewell Avery’s removal from office demonstrated his fear of business interference with regulatory policies, Phillips said.“[FDR] feels that if Avery defies what the National War Labor Board’s recommendations are, then every other business owner will become emboldened as well,” she said.Despite the president’s strong message, Phillips said business owners nevertheless began to express their dissatisfaction.“They can’t run the business in a way they see fit,” she said. “They have to adhere to what the union says, and they have to agree to what the government is telling them to do in terms of regulating the conditions of wages and work.”Phillips said businessmen challenged FDR’s New Deal policies by launching public campaigns and lobbying efforts.“Part of what the business community was doing was to convince the American public that business was the epitome of American democracy in that it needed to spread worldwide,” she said. “[The business community] literally took on an ad campaign through advertising to convey this particular message.“Campaign finance reform, taxes, tax structure, all of these things, I think, were bolstered through these networks of businessmen.”Tags: FDR, Higgins Lunchtime Labor RAPS, Montgomery Ward, New Deal, Sewell Averylast_img read more

Students discuss diversity and ‘colorblindness’

first_imgThe Saint Mary’s Justice Education program hosted a panel of students who discussed the importance of recognizing diversity in our everyday lives and the media as part of the Justice Friday series. The conversation was led by seniors Taylr Davis and Courtney Lamar, junior Caylin McCallick and sophomore Alex Shambery. Lamar explained there are a lot of aspects that makeup the concept of diversity. “Diversity includes all aspects [of a person] whether that’s race, gender, socioeconomic status, sexual preference, et cetera.” When asked about the validity of the term “colorblind,” Davis said that concept can be misconstrued to promote hatred.“I truly believe that if you teach people that seeing others is not about the color of your skin then yes, people can use the idea of being ‘colorblind,’” Davis said. “However, many people use it as a crutch … They use it to say, ‘Oh, I don’t see color’ but then they go off and do something racist so I feel like it doesn’t have an equal proponent.”Lamar said in order to progress as a community, the recognition of diversity is a necessity. “You have to acknowledge that someone is different than you to move forward. To get all the best perspectives, you have to acknowledge diversity and that you come from different backgrounds and have different experiences.” Shambery noted how important it is to see people as who they are, rather than labeling them by the color of their skin.“Yes, I‘m black, but just because I’m black no one should assume they know me, what I stand for or what I’ve been through just by looking at my skin tone,” She said. “I think that’s something that’s very important to think about when we talk about whether or not we believe in the idea of being colorblind.” Shambery explained how valuable having a diverse group of friends can be.“It’s amazing; it’s one of the best things in the world having best friends who are [different than] me,” she said. “I can’t imagine having only friends who are exactly like me, who come from the exact same background as me and like the exact same things that I do. That would be extremely boring and how can you grow when people are exactly like you?” McCallick said people benefit from both their personal and professional lives by engaging with diverse groups of people.“Groups that are diverse [explore] more avenues because people are coming from all these different intersections in their lives and are seeing things from different perspectives, which allows a group to solve more problems and think more creatively.”The panel also focused on the influence media has in perpetuating white culture as the norm. “I don’t watch TV often, but when I do I’m constantly appalled by the abundance of all white commercials,” Shambery said.“ I rarely see people of color. I rarely see interracial couples. I rarely see queer couples. I rarely see Muslims or Jews or disabled people. I rarely see commercials of poor black kids in America. I rarely see reports of Hispanic, of Black kids going missing.”Lamar also commented on how important it is to normalize diversity in the media“Seeing underrepresented people in the media shouldn’t be shocking … movies shouldn’t focus on stereotypical struggles of [black people], that creates a stigma about it.”Lamar said there is hope for the future and she has already seen some positive examples of diversity in modern media.“I see good influences with the Buzzfeed and Facebook videos and their incorporation of different types of people into their videos,” she said. “These videos relate to our generation, are very popular and can influence our generation into becoming more diverse and open.” The Justice Friday series takes place every Friday from 12:10-12:50 p.m. in the Student Center.Tags: colorblind, Diversity, Justice Fridaylast_img read more

The Shirt 2017 features football players, ‘Here Come the Irish’

first_imgFor the first football season with the new Jumbotron, students will see themselves wearing navy, the color of this year’s The Shirt.The design for the front of The Shirt features football players holding hands, and the back carries an excerpt from the lyrics of the song “Here Come the Irish,” which was written by former football player and special guest of the unveiling ceremony John Scully. According to a University press release, this is the first time The Shirt has been navy since 2012. Michael Yu | The Observer Members of the Notre Dame cheerleading team don the 2017 edition of the shirt as they cheer at the unveiling ceremony at the Hammes Bookstore on Friday.Justin McCurdy, president of The Shirt committee, said this year’s design encompasses various aspects of Notre Dame football games.“It’s crisp, it’s clean, it’s Notre Dame, the navy, and it captures all aspects of the start of a football game: the players walking out, the fans getting the chills when the song comes on, the cheerleaders running out of the tunnel,” McCurdy said. “It just incorporates that beginning that we all know to the Notre Dame football games.”Kristin Andrejko, vice president of The Shirt committee, said the Notre Dame football experience is a unique one, and this year’s Shirt seeks to replicate that.“I think it’s special because I’ve never seen a Shirt that captures a moment in the stadium, and I think this Shirt really does just that,” Andrejko said. “It’s the players walking out at the beginning of the game, holding hands, a sign of unity … and it’s the chills you get when you hear ‘There’s a magic in the sound of their name.’”To create excitement about The Shirt unveiling, the committee hosted several events last week, allowing students to design a Shirt on a cookie in the dining halls and to participate in an Amazing Race scavenger hunt, which had a prize of two on-field tickets for the Notre Dame-Miami (Ohio) game next year.“The Amazing Race, all headed by Alex Richard, was over in 11 minutes,” McCurdy said. “People were running into the final location sweating, out of breath. It was great.”Andrejko, who will serve as the president of The Shirt Committee next year, said the group looks forward to doing the event again.The unveiling ceremony itself featured free food from Barnaby’s Pizza, Let’s Spoon and ND Catering as well as performances by musical groups on campus and an appearance by Scully.The proceeds from The Shirt will be split between the Student Union and Student Enrichment Endowment, which seeks to allow all students to enjoy the Notre Dame experience regardless of their financial situation.Tags: Student Enrichment Endowment, Student Union, The Shirt, The Shirt committeelast_img read more

Construction on Angela Athletic and Wellness Complex continues

first_imgAs the Spring semester comes to a close for students, work on the new Saint Mary’s Angela Athletic and Wellness Complex continues to develop. Benjamin Bowman, the Saint Mary’s construction manager, said, as of right now, the project is on schedule and under budget.“The contractors are doing are a great job,” he said. “They’ve had to work through a lot of different weather conditions.”Despite being on schedule, Bowman said even though the weather has caused delays along the way, Weigand Construction has been working Saturdays and occasional Sundays to make up for lost time.“Normally in the winter the ground will freeze hard and the contractors can move heavy equipment over it,” he said. “This winter it never really froze hard, it created these muddy conditions which was difficult for the contractors when they were putting in the concrete foundations.”Bowman said contractors are currently working on phase one of three which entails work on the field house and the lower level restrooms.“That space they need to turn over to us in August,” he said. “That’s so the Fall athletes have a place to practice indoors.”Athletic director, Julie Schroeder-Biek said in an email that being without an athletic facility has been a challenge for Spring sports teams practice schedules.“It adds an entirely new level of planning for our coaches — if we have inclement weather that doesn’t allow us to practice outside, we have to get very creative,” she said. “Coaches may take their athletes to hit the weight room, watch game film or use various indoor spaces available in the local community or at Notre Dame.”Despite the challenges, Schroeder-Biek said she is looking forward to the new complex.“This building is going to be beautiful,” she said. “It is a building that we are going to be so proud of.”Bowman said phase two, the coach’s offices, is then projected to be completed in either October or November. Phase three, the final phase, will be the health and counseling suite on the South side of the building and should be completed in January of 2018.“It’s pretty amazing,” Bowman said. “The old facility was 44,000 square feet, this one’s 103,000. So it’s over double what the old facility was in size.”However, the 44,000 square feet did not go to waste when the building was torn down. Bowman said Saint Mary’s requires 50 to 75 percent of the demolished material must be recycled for sustainability purposes.“The metal gets sorted and melted down and created into new beams,” he said. “The block and all the concrete parts gets ground up and made into new concrete.”Schroeder-Biek said she thinks the complex will help bring the Saint Mary’s community together. As a result, extending facility hours is currently being considered.“This building will be home to athletics, health and counseling, [the Belles Against Violence Office] and a cafe,” Schroeder-Biek said. “It will be a great place to gather, to cheer on the Belles, to get in a work out, to study with friends, to grab a cup of coffee or a smoothie.”Bowman said Sodexo, a food services company, is currently working on a menu for the cafe that will include healthier options such as smoothies, salads, panini and made-to-order sandwiches. In addition to the cafe, there will be a total of five lounges for students. In order to accommodate for those spaces, there will be 85 wireless access points throughout the building.“There should never be an issue connecting to Wi-Fi,” Bowman said. “Even some of the new equipment will communicate wirelessly.”Besides some equipment pieces that are only a couple years old, Bowman said the rest of the equipment will be new.Other new features include an elevator and a ramp going to the lower level which Bowman says will be able to support an ambulance if needed, a new one-eighth mile track, rather than the previous one-tenth mile track, with smoother corners, not one, but three separate locker rooms for Saint Mary’s athletic teams with a varsity lounge next to them, a laundry facility and a locker room for visiting teams instead of using the racquetball court as teams have in the past.“Not only is it a good collaborative space, but it will also be a space where you’ll see a lot of activity, which will potentially motivate students, employees and faculty,” Bowman said. “It will be a lively space.”The abundance of windows incorporated in the building will help add to the liveliness of the complex Bowman said – that is what he and the contractors call “daylight harvesting.”“The north [side] will have more than the south,” he said. “That’s because the south side is where the sun is, less windows will ensure the building doesn’t gain too much heat.”Even the structure of the building specifically allows for more activity he said.“The design of the building itself has a major north-south spine which lines up with the entry to the athletic fields and LeMans tower,” he said. “So when students park in that North parking, you have the option to walk through the building to get to campus which is part of the activity.”Bowman said what he is looking forward to most is seeing the transformation and the community’s reactions.“I’m on my sixth group of people touring through the building,” he said. “I enjoy doing that and seeing their eyes light up and the excitement in their faces.”All are able to enjoy the transformation both on and off campus through two cameras that have been mounted on campus. To view the progress, visit the Saint Mary’s Athletics page under the “Renovations” tab.Tags: angela athletic and wellness complex, Saint Mary’s Construction, Weigand Construction Colast_img read more

Angela facility dedication continues with wellness workshops, discussions

first_imgSaint Mary’s dedication ceremony for the new Angela Athletic and Wellness Complex continued Saturday with a variety of workout classes, concurrent sessions, speeches and panels revolving around health and wellness.Director of athletics Julie Schroeder-Biek, who helped plan the ceremony, said she feels proud of the new building.“This facility is such an inviting place,” she said. “Here on this campus, I feel that the impact is in how it will build community. We have students, faculty and staff and alumnae working out here, meeting here, eating here, cheering on the Belles here. [It’s] just a great blend of people using this space.”Throughout the weekend, the College held myriad workshops and other events about fitness for the community.“Rather than have this dedication event in one night, our desire to thank the donors, celebrate the space with wellness programming and bring in prospective students to celebrate with us required a multiple day event,” Schroeder-Biek said.The closing keynote, titled “Striking the Right Balance — Keys for Powerful Living,” featured three College alumnae and was described as a “TED-style talk” by College President Jan Cervelli.“No one arrives to this college or the real world fully formed,” Cervelli said. “Today’s event will address stretching, growing and being comfortable with setbacks to enable a growth mindset and find balance in our lives.”One of the three speakers of the keynote, Kimberlyn Martin Troy, a ’00 alumna and fitness instructor at the College, spoke about wellness of the body and how her mom said she seemed more confident when she first went home for break during her time at Saint Mary’s.“As students, we have a voice here,” Troy said. “It wasn’t Saint Mary’s teaching me to [be] powerful. I was realizing the power I already had.”Everyone has natural balance and power inside of them, Troy said, and allowing yourself to be a beginner is a way for you to find that balance and power within yourself.“There’s value in every single moment of every day,” she said. “Awareness is all the balance you need to live your most powerful life.”Alumna Elizabeth Palmer, ’13, spoke about wellness of the spirit by reflecting on her time doing mission work in a Kenyan burn unit.“A wise man once told me, ‘the best book you’ll ever read are human stories [and] the best libraries are hospitals,’” Palmer said.A patient at the hospital named Dorcas could not see Palmer, but Palmer said they would share love by holding hands.“We could not share verbal communication or eye contact, but our hands would always clasp together,” she said. “Dorcas showed me that God’s hand is always outstretched towards me.”Encountering patients and her Saint Mary’s education was a transformative experience, Palmer said, since those experiences gave her the confidence to endure the hardship in the burn ward.A grade school teacher and Saint Mary’s alumna who acted as a mentor during her parents’ divorce inspired her to attend the College, Palmer said. The influence strong women had on her life made the decision to attend Saint Mary’s natural, she said.“I have been shaped by strong, independent women all along,” she said. “An integral part of my development has been to know God’s love. At Saint Mary’s, I constantly see the face of Christ of others.”As a licensed clinical social worker,M.J. Murray Vachon, ’82, spoke at the keynote address about ‘Inner Challenge,’ her life skills and character development program. She said her clients and students often understand what mental illness is, but do not know how to define mental wellness.“Mental wellness needs to be understood and cultivated,” she said. “One in six of us each year will suffer from symptoms of mental illness. Just like healthy eating prevents, manages and sometimes cures diabetes, mental wellness life skills prevents, manages and sometimes cures mental health issues.”Murray Vachon said grounding one’s feet on the floor, taking deep breaths and noticing one particular thing in front of you can help one feel more connected to their body and surroundings.“This exercise cultivates beauty,” she said. “Notice cultivates beauty. Notice cultivates gratitude.”Mental wellness is key to becoming an authentic individual who can find their identity and balance within, Murray Vachon said.“The whole [Angela] facility was built to consider our bodies, minds, and spirits,” she said. “We can show up, we can live and we can have lives that are balanced and rooted in power that is rooted in the spirit, not the ego.”Tags: angela athletic and wellness complex, dedication ceremony, elizabeth palmer, Julie Schroeder-Biek, Kimberlyn Martin Troy, M.J. Murray Vachonlast_img read more