A disability charity has been criticised by disabl

A disability charity has been criticised by disabl

first_imgA disability charity has been criticised by disabled activists for ploughing its resources into an “embarrassing” and “hypocritical” new campaign that has cost nearly £1 million.Scope released a series of six comic sketches, produced in conjunction with Channel 4, which dramatised some of the embarrassing reactions and comments that disabled people have had to face in their daily lives.Scope claimed that the message of its “End the Awkward” campaign – which is in its second year – was “straightforward”, and aimed simply to encourage non-disabled people to get to know disabled people.The charity said: “There is no single right answer on how best to act around our disabled neighbours or colleagues. The most important thing is to be willing to try, to learn and not to shy away.”The six short films – presented by disabled presenter and journalist Alex Brooker, who was paid for some of his work, although not by Scope – secured widespread publicity across mainstream media, including slots on Channel 4, Channel 5 and ITV, and an article in The Independent.The films also won support on social media from a string of disability organisations – most of them, but not all, organisations not led by disabled people – such as Shaw Trust, Ataxia UK, Turning Point, Leonard Cheshire, Muscular Dystrophy UK, and the British Association for Supported Employment.But that support was followed by a substantial backlash from disabled activists.Many criticised the campaign’s confusing message, and questioned whether “ending the awkward” was really the most important issue facing disabled people.Brian Hilton, campaigns officer for Greater Manchester Coalition of Disabled People, said: “I am staggered that Scope are continuing to run this campaign for a second year, and can only wonder how they settled on this as the issue they want to plough their time and resources into.“With disability hate crime on the increase, the closure of the Independent Living Fund, the bedroom tax, the assisted dying bill, the cumulative effects of cuts on disabled people and the vilification of disabled people in the right-wing press, why is Scope still banging on about ‘End the Awkward’?“They may say ‘End the Awkward’. I say ‘End the Waste of Money’.”He also said that Scope’s message appeared to be confused. “I’m not sure if they are saying it’s wrong to ask inappropriate questions or speak and act differently around disabled people; or are they saying that disabled people should put up with stares and questions about our missing bits?”Bob Williams-Findlay, a former chair of the British Council of Disabled People, described the campaign as hypocritical and “patronising middle-class pimping”.He said: “I think it’s awkward when in the 21st century there is still a charity producing embarrassing crap on behalf of people capable of doing a better job.“What’s awkward is knowing this charity has never come clean about its own oppressive, abusive past.”He has spoken previously of attending a residential school run by the Spastics Society – the charity that was later renamed Scope – and has criticised the charity’s discriminatory history.Lorraine Gradwell, former chief executive of Breakthrough UK, another influential figure in the disabled people’s movement, said: “‘End the Awkward’ neatly ignores the pressing matters around disability such as social security, housing, and hate crime.“Scope have got everything wrong with this campaign, treating people’s attitudes to disability as if it were just a matter of good manners, when in reality it’s often about blatant discrimination.“I’d be happier if the campaign was directed at non-disabled people, asking them how they thought they could improve their attitude.”And Dr Theo Blackmore, an independent researcher, said that Scope had been founded by the parents of disabled children and had always been an “organisation for disabled people, not of them”, with fewer than one in five of their staff disabled people.He said: “In fact, I would suggest that Scope is an organisation for the parents of disabled children.“There is a big gap in the market for such an organisation, whereas there are lots of major national organisations that do not employ many disabled people and are run ‘for’ disabled people.“This is a very paternalistic model for organisations that should employ a majority of disabled people, while also being governed by us through their management committees.“‘End the Awkward’ would be better directed at Scope themselves, who could stop speaking up for us and start employing us.”In a statement, a Scope spokeswoman said this year’s campaign had “cost just under £1 million”.She that disabled people had been “actively consulted and involved in the creation and refinement of this campaign at every stage”, while the stories the campaign was based on were “real, and told to us by disabled people”.The spokeswoman said the charity had worked with leaders of disabled people’s organisations, as well as disabled and non-disabled people from “a wide age range [and] from different backgrounds”.She said Scope was running the campaign because “many disabled people tell us that while their aspirations are higher than ever, public attitudes to disability continue to be an issue in their everyday lives.“Our ads may be light-hearted, but they address a serious issue – the way that society treats disabled people.“We want to build on this conversation about awkwardness to influence politicians, policymakers, and public opinion on key issues like increasing the disability employment rate, independent living and reducing the extra costs disabled people face.“We have released reports highlighting what we believe should happen in each of these areas, and we will be working hard to influence decision-makers to take forward the clear recommendations we have set out.”She added: “Hate crime and real discrimination against disabled people are unacceptable and unfortunately continue to happen in 2015.“We campaign on these issues and support other charities’ campaigns on them. We don’t want to make light of them.“But with this campaign, we have tried to find a way to get people talking about disability and to break down some of the barriers that exist between disabled people and the general public.”She said the campaign reached 24 million people last year, while “81 per cent of people we polled said their attitude toward disability was different as a result of watching the adverts”.last_img read more

The process of exiting the European Union EU cou

The process of exiting the European Union EU cou

first_imgThe process of exiting the European Union (EU) could worsen the social care crisis if the UK government does not protect access to personal assistants (PAs) from EU countries, disabled peers have warned.They told a work and pensions minister that uncertainty over the “Brexit” negotiations with fellow EU members was leading to “terrible uncertainty” among the thousands of disabled people whose PAs are citizens of other EU countries.But peers heard that there was not a single mention of disabled people or disability in the government’s white paper on Brexit.The disabled crossbench peer Baroness [Jane] Campbell told the Lords debate on the impact of Brexit on disabled people – secured by the Liberal Democrat peer Baroness Scott – that she had employed PAs from at least 10 EU countries in the last 25 years.Baroness Campbell (pictured) told fellow peers that other disabled people who employed PAs had told her that the pool of potential employees was “drying up”, while demand continued to rise, which meant the EU workforce was an “essential supplement”.She said that John Evans, one of the founders of the UK independent living movement, and of the European Network on Independent Living, had told her that he had employed PAs from 15 EU countries in the past 34 years.He told her: “If the government does not make some kind of arrangement to protect our access to the EU PA workforce, I will lose my freedom again.”Evans said he feared that this would mean having to return to residential care, 34 years after he was liberated from a Cheshire Home.Baroness Campbell told the debate: “We constantly hear about the threat to the NHS if restrictions to work in the UK are tightened.“The PAs and carers ​employed by thousands of disabled people must be accorded the same attention; otherwise, the current social care crisis will worsen and disabled people will lose the right to independent living, as set out in Article 19 of the UN convention [on the rights of disabled people].”Baroness [Celia] Thomas, the disabled Liberal Democrat peer, who speaks for her party on disability issues, said: “There is now a terrible uncertainty about what will happen in the future.“Will we have reciprocity for all the working people from the EU who are settled in this country to stay after Brexit?“This is perhaps the greatest worry for many disabled people, as they are now used to the high standards and attitudes of many EU care workers.”The crossbench disabled peer Baroness Masham said: “I am very concerned when I hear members of the government say that we want to let in only the brightest people when Brexit takes place. This will be a disaster for disabled people who need help.“We have many disabled people, some of whom can work, but they need carers who can help with personal care and mobility.“We do not have enough British people who want to do such jobs.”The debate also heard of fears that disabled people could lose several important legal rights if the UK left the European single market as well as the EU.The disabled crossbench peer Lord [Colin] Low said that EU measures that ensure accessibility has to be considered when awarding many public contracts “offer a substantial lever for improving accessibility and bringing about change”, while another EU directive ensures the accessibility of public sector websites.He also pointed to a proposed EU directive that is set to “harmonise accessibility requirements across the EU for a wide range of goods and services”, including smartphones, computers, ticket machines, cash machines, retailers’ websites, banking and e-books.He said: “From the point of view of disabled people, there can be no doubt that it would make sense for the UK to remain a member of the single market.“If we do not, and if we are to safeguard the interests of disabled people, we need, on Brexit, to bring across as many of the benefits of the single market as possible.”Baroness Scott said she feared that Brexit would lead to a “rush to deregulation”, which would “reduce the statutory protections available to disabled people, especially with regard to employment and access rights”.She warned: “Anti-discrimination laws, while enacted by this parliament, have their roots in EU law and could be removed by this or a future government should they choose.”Her party colleague Baroness Thomas added: “The difficulty will come when the government decide which laws will be scrapped altogether.”She said she was particularly concerned “about hard-won rights in the fields of, for example, product design, air and rail travel, employment, building accessibility, public sector website accessibility and many others”.The Conservative work and pensions minister, Lord Henley, provided few clues as to which rights the government wanted to protect, but insisted that it had a “firm commitment” to “maintaining the United Kingdom’s strong and long-standing record of protecting the rights and traditional liberties, and to supporting disabled people to fulfil their potential”.He said that he could “assure the House [of Lords] of the protections covered in the Equality Act 2010”, but then failed to say whether the government would maintain all of those protections after the UK left the EU.He said: “The precise way in which the government will determine how to control the movement of EU nationals to the UK after Brexit has obviously yet to be determined.”He said it was “important that we understand the impact of any changes that we make on the different sectors of the economy and the labour market, including on health and social provision” and that “this is a matter that will be foremost in our minds in negotiations”.Lord Henley said that Department for Work and Pensions civil servants were in discussions with officials in other departments “to ensure that disability issues are given due consideration”.last_img read more

The Green party has called in its general election

The Green party has called in its general election

first_imgThe Green party has called in its general election manifesto for moves towards an inclusive education system, as well as pledging universal free social care, significantly more accessible homes and a fully accessible transport system.The manifesto proposes moves towards a universal basic income, a benefit system in which everyone in the country – no matter how wealthy – would receive a regular cash payment, without conditions and without means-testing.The party also calls for action on accessible housing, saying that it wants to “significantly improve housing choice” for disabled and older people.And the manifesto says that all public transport should be “fully accessible and step-free”, while it would phase in free local public transport for young people, students, and disabled and older people.But a party spokesman backed away from the idea of a completely step-free transport system and instead suggested that its “fully accessible” transport policy meant that “necessary arrangements” would be made to meet the “reasonable transportation needs of disabled people beyond that which can be provided through general services”.The manifesto also calls for investment in “safe, convenient networks of routes for walking and cycling”, which would be accessible to disabled people, including those using mobility scooters.On social care, a spokesman said the party believed that an “integrated health and social care service is vital” and that there should be an end to “the false distinction between nursing and personal care”.He said the party would invest at least £7.5 billion a year to deliver universal free social care, which could be funded by “a combination of changes to pension tax relief to generate just over £7 billion a year and reforms to inheritance tax, generating £1 billion a year”.The Green manifesto says the party would ask all councils to plan “appropriately” for the housing needs of disabled and older people and “significantly increase the numbers of homes built to lifetime home and mobility standards over the next five years”.And it says it wants every child who is disabled or has special educational needs to have access to a mainstream education, “in accordance with” the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, which in article 24 demands “an inclusive education system at all levels”.Last August, the UN committee on the rights of person with disabilities issued new guidance that made it clear that all segregated education should end and be replaced by “inclusive classroom teaching in accessible learning environments with appropriate supports”.But the Green party appears to be stopping short of the UN guidance, telling Disability News Service that it “supports the principle of offering all people the opportunity to be educated in a mainstream school, and meeting everyone’s needs, whatever the level of need may be”.It argues that in “exceptional cases it is not appropriate to be fully integrated into mainstream education for all subjects, for example where there are multiple learning difficulties”, while children with behavioural and emotional difficulties “need to be protected by temporary separation”.A party spokesman said: “In the longer term the Green Party hopes to address this through having special resource units in mainstream schools.”On social security, as well as a pledge to abolish the bedroom tax, the party promises a system that would “redress benefits injustice” and give “everyone confidence they will get support when they need it, including disabled people”.Further details are expected next week when the party publishes a mini-manifesto on disability.The manifesto also promises to end the gender pay gap, but makes no mention of the disability pay gap, despite the significant gap reported last month by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC), although a party spokesman said: “We want to close the pay gap for everyone.”There is also a manifesto promise on diversity in representative politics, including a pledge to introduce job-sharing for elected office, which should benefit disabled people who want to become MPs but cannot work full-time.The party takes a strong anti-Brexit position, promising to campaign for a vote on the final terms of the Brexit deal negotiated by the government, including an option to reverse the result of the referendum and stay in the European Union.It also promises to take action to tackle disability discrimination – extending current legislation – defend the Human Rights Act and UK membership of the European Convention on Human Rights, and reinstate some of the funding cuts made by the last two governments to the budget of the Equality and Human Rights Commission.In the manifesto’s 26 pages, there are seven mentions of the words “disabled”, “disability” or “disabilities”.Pictured: Green party co-leaders, Caroline Lucas and Jonathan Bartleylast_img read more

Tags Young Labour Labour Labour Students Th

Tags Young Labour Labour Labour Students Th

first_imgTags:Young Labour /Labour /Labour Students /The Independent Group / A row has engulfed the national organisation of young Labour activists – Young Labour – over its reaction to the news of seven Labour MPs quitting the party today.During the press conference held by the new “Independent Group” of anti-Corbyn MPs, the official Young Labour account tweeted: “Though cowards flinch and traitors sneer, we’ll keep the red flag flying here.”Many replies condemned the quoting of the Labour Party anthem ‘Red Flag’, as some activists pointed out that it implied Luciana Berger – who named antisemitism as a key reason for her decision to quit the party – was a “coward” and a “traitor”.Young Labour’s international officer Marcus Barnett retweeted the post, but Young Labour chair Miriam Mirwitch called for the tweet to be taken down.Commenting on the tweet, Mirwitch said: “This tweet is entirely inappropriate. I do not support it. I am strongly opposed to Labour splits, but [this] is the incorrect response.“A member of Young Labour National Committee proposed that we delete this tweet. As this is so contentious, members of [the executive committee] are voting.”Meanwhile, Labour Students – an organisation that remains under the control of anti-Corbyn activists – also came under fire, but for expressing the opposite view.Labour Students tweeted: “This is a very sad day for the Labour Party. Those celebrating these resignations, in part a response to antisemitism, are completely wrong. But we urge all others to stay and fight for a transformative Labour government, which would once again change Britain for the better.”Labour’s national executive committee (NEC) youth rep Lara McNeill commented that it was “outrageous” for party staff to have posted the tweet, as the account is managed by paid full-time officers.“These MPs are centrists who have prioritised themselves over getting a Labour government – that is the crux of this,” McNeill added. “They should be entirely condemned by the entire Labour movement for attacking our party at this crucial time.”last_img read more

SF Mission residential hotels renovated for wealthier tenants

SF Mission residential hotels renovated for wealthier tenants

first_imgMaybe it’s the fresh blue paint that makes 2072 Mission stand out from its less-kept-up neighbors on the busy block between 16th and 17th streets. Or maybe it’s the gallery space at ground level that, a couple years ago, once belonged to the struggling Milan Pizza.Before Starcity, a communal living development, opened last spring, 2072 Mission St. was a hotel with 16 single residence occupancy (SRO) rooms, typically reserved for San Francisco’s lowest-income residents. Residents there paid $450 a month. Nowadays, its rooms have been renovated and go for $1,900 to $2,100 a month.  Legally, Starcity still operates a residential hotel, according to San Francisco’s Housing Inspection Services and Starcity’s co-founder, Mo Sakrani. But Starcity, like other SRO owners, has discovered a loophole in the city’s regulations: owners are allowed to renovate rooms and charge as much for rent as they like. Upgrading SRO rooms to attract more-affluent tenants has been a trend in recent years, said Diana Martinez, program manager at the Mission SRO Collaborative, a nonprofit dedicated to providing services to the low-income residents of SROs. 0% “It’s a new type of definition of what SROs are, which was actually not something that was predicted,” Martinez said.When the city first passed Ordinance 41 in 1981, the intent was “to preserve affordable housing by preventing the loss of residential hotel units through conversion or demolition, and to prevent the displacement of low-income, elderly, and disabled persons,” according to the city’s website.A 1979 study counted 26,884 SRO units in San Francisco, and those numbers were diminishing. By 2011, the number of residential units stood at 18,910. Those numbers have gone up slightly; in 2015, the city reported a total of 19,166 units, but that includes units that are no longer affordable to low-income residents.Of the Mission’s nearly 1,000 SRO units, 75 — or 8 percent — had become unaffordable for low-income residents by 2015.Martinez said those losses have gotten worse in the last two years. San Francisco’s regulations on SRO rooms are intended to protect a stock of low-income housing vital to many in San Francisco. As of this year, rooms must be rented for at least 32 days at a time. Although removing a room from the SRO system can be expensive or even illegal, there is no legal limit to how much rent a landlord can charge for an SRO room.Increasingly, Martinez said, owners are renovating previously cheap, undesirable housing into dormitory-style living for young, entry-level professionals. At Starcity, residents rent private bedrooms while sharing kitchens, bathrooms and leisure space.It’s a trend the Mission SRO collaborative has been tracking.“When I started working here almost three years ago, that’s when construction was going on with different SROs,” Martinez said. “We saw them closing temporarily.”Back then she and her colleagues at the Mission SRO Collaborative could not figure out exactly why this was happening. Then, two years ago, they did a survey of residential hotels in the neighborhood and found widespread conversion of cheap rooms for low-income residents into renovated rooms for higher income residents. Martinez said she has seen it happen at the Sunrise Hotel on 447 Valencia St., which currently charges $1,800 per month for a single resident room; at the Kaileh Hotel at 1041 Valencia St., which listed one of its rooms on the rental site Hotpads as a studio for $900 a month in 2015; at the Radha Hotel at 2042 Mission St.; at the Eula Hotel at 306116th St.; and at the Graywood Hotel on 29th St., where, she said, walking through the halls before it was destroyed in a fire, it was clear which doors opened to renovated units because those doors were painted white. The un-renovated units had brown doors.When Starcity bought the building at 2072 Mission St. in 2015, it was called the Yug Hotel. Only three permanent residents lived there, Sakrani said. He attributed this to mismanagement. Of the three tenants, one was a man who was almost 80 and needed daily care, according to Sakrani. Starcity arranged to have him taken to San Francisco Healthcare and Rehab on Grove Street, where he is staying long-term. Sakrani said the Starcity team checks on him regularly.The other two residents are Eduardo, a 78-year-old man from Panama, and O.C., a man in his fifties. Both still live in the Starcity building and pay their old rent,  $500 a month. They remained in the building throughout the renovation process, and their rooms were remodeled, Sakrani said. “We made a decision that we want to keep as much of the history of the building intact as possible, as well as the community of people who were living here,” said Sakrani. “It’s their home, for, in one case, over two decades, and, in another case, over a decade, and so they were informed, throughout our development process, of what was happening, and they were told when they could start utilizing the downstairs space. They were introduced to the new community members as they moved in.”For the new 14 residents of Starcity, rent is four times what Eduardo and O.C. pay, and what other tenants would have paid before the renovation. But, Sakrani noted, all of the current residents enjoy much better facilities, including a communal kitchen and a backyard patio. The communal spaces are cleaned, and a live-in manager coordinates activities for the residents.Before the renovation, Sakrani said, one of the rooms was full of black mold, and in a different room, the electricity was out. The building had no kitchen and few bathrooms. There was no laundry facility.Sakrani believes the two tenants from the Yug Hotel have appreciated the improvements to their living space. O.C. spends time in the common spaces and plays music with the building’s other residents.Martinez said the Starcity founders have met and worked with the Mission SRO Collaborative to ensure those two residents’ needs are met. Starcity has participated in fire safety training at the Mission SRO Collaborative’s request. Representatives from the fire department and the Collaborative were present.“We have been in contact with Starcity because … we are working with the city to preserve housing stock and do what we can to mitigate the situation, but in the meantime, SRO buildings are being flipped,” said Martinez.Closing the Loophole?Martinez said there are efforts to control rent increases in SRO rooms. The Mission Action Plan 2020, a planning department initiative to retain low-income residents in the neighborhood, recommends additional regulations for SROs. The idea, however, is considered “‘on hold’ because of legal, political, or financial constraints,” according to the plan.In a city with a housing shortage, Sakrani emphasized that providing housing for middle-income residents helps alleviate the crisis. Compared to other housing development projects in the Mission, Starcity’s rents are more affordable.The company hopes to attract people who make $50,000 to $80,000 a year. Most new housing development projects in the Mission, Sakrani noted, target people with much higher incomes. But Martinez said converting buildings designed for low-income residents doesn’t do any good for traditional SRO clients. “Any new housing that does not have low-income rents is not beneficial to the community we work with,” she said.Sakrani said the company is relatively new and does not plan to develop any more existing residential buildings. “We started to realize the implications of developers who do this on a mass scale,” he said. “It’s really important for us to build partnerships in the community and have a positive effect in the community. There’s still a lot that we can do.” center_img Tags: housing • SROs Share this: FacebookTwitterRedditemail,0%last_img read more

PAUL Wellens has extended his contract at Saints u

first_imgPAUL Wellens has extended his contract at Saints until the end of the 2015 season.Fresh from lifting the First Utility Super League title, the 34-year-old has penned a deal that will see him represent the club for the 20th season.He joined Saints’ Academy system in 1996, made his first team debut in 1998 and has gone on to play 491 times for the Red V, scoring 230 tries, 40 goals and one drop goal for 1,001 points.‘Wello’ is also named in the Club’s Greatest 17.“I’m really looking forward to 2015,” Paul said. “With a World Club Challenge to look forward to, the new Super League format and a title to defend it is a very exciting time for the club.“I’m in the very latter stages of my career and with a good crop of young players coming through my focus is on training hard and competing for a place in the team whilst also using my experience to help these young players develop further.“This is a challenge I’m looking forward to. I’m also excited to be working with Keiron Cunningham, Jamahl Lolesi and Sean Long.”Head Coach Keiron Cunningham added: “It’s great that Paul has agreed to extend his contract by another season.“He proved his versatility in our Championship winning season by playing in many positions and performing at a high level.“His commitment to the club is superb; he is the ultimate professional and that rubs off on all those around him. He is also keen to learn and improve, setting himself challenges to get better.“His strong and respected relationship with the players is evident by the fact he wants to help improve Jonny Lomax’ game at fullback – the position he plays in.“That is a fantastic and unselfish example to the young players in the squad.”In his time at the club, Paul has won two World Club Challenges, five Super League titles and five Challenge Cups as well as being part of the team that has secured the League Leaders’ Shield five times.He also won the Man of Steel and Harry Sunderland Awards in 2006 and the Lance Todd Trophy in 2007 and 2008.Paul will wear the number 20 shirt this season whilst new signings Travis Burns and Atelea Vea will be 6 and 11.Kyle Amor moves to 10 with Louie McCarthy-Scarsbrook at 13.After their great performances in our Championship winning season Luke Thompson and Greg Richards have been given 18 and 19 respectively.Dave Hewitt (27), Jack Ashworth (28), Olly Davies (29) and Matty Fleming (30) have all been promoted to the squad alongside Matty Fozard (31).The squad is:1. Jonny Lomax, 2. Thomas Makinson, 3. Jordan Turner, 4. Josh Jones, 5. Adam Swift, 6. Travis Burns, 7. Luke Walsh, 8. Mose Masoe, 9. James Roby, 10. Kyle Amor, 11. Atelea Vea, 12. Jon Wilkin, 13. Louie McCarthy-Scarsbrook, 14. Alex Walmsley, 15. Mark Flanagan, 16. Lance Hohaia, 17. Mark Percival, 18. Luke Thompson, 19. Greg Richards, 20. Paul Wellens, 21. Joe Greenwood, 22. Matty Dawson, 23. Anthony Walker, 24. Jordan Hand, 25. Andre Savelio, 26. Lewis Charnock, 27. Dave Hewitt, 28. Jack Ashworth, 29. Olly Davies, 30. Matty Fleming, 31. Matty Fozard.last_img read more

SAINTS Reserves completed an extremely successful

first_imgSAINTS Reserves completed an extremely successful season by doing the double over a very competitive Halifax side at Langtree on Friday evening, writes Graham Henthorne.Both sides fielded long benches but it was the Saints who struck first to open the scoring on seven minutes in what eventually became a 42-10 victory.A great grubber from Tom Connick bought a repeat set and after a couple of set up drives quick hands to the right saw Danny Richardson and then Jake Spedding get the ball out to winger Kevin Brown. With four players converging on him the pocket rocket stuck his head taking them all over the line with him.Both sides traded possessions for a period of time but when Fax knocked on at the half way mark they gave the Saints good field position which they weren’t about to waste this time.They pounded the line for five tackles then on the last Aaron Smith and Jack Ashworth spotted a gap on the blind side. Ashworth threw a great miss pass out to Brown and the winger again did the business this tie stepping off his right to slip under the defensive cover.The Saints pack were controlling the middle of the park well but the visitors, prompted by scrum half Connor Robinson, continued to pose problems for the Saints.But on the half hour a stray pass from a Fax attack was taken by Dave Llewellyn. Quick thinking from the veteran saw the ball flipped backwards between his legs to put the supporting McDonnell away. Two tackles later and the ball reached Regan Grace on the left, two steps later and the winger was rounding a prop down the middle then streaking through the gap and outstripping the cover over the final 60 metres to score to the left of the posts.On the stroke of the break Olly Davies scored Saints fourth of the half charging powerfully onto the ball 10 metres out. Richardson’s easiest conversion of the night put the Saints 22 points up and effectively out of sight.Fax had other ideas at the restart, however, as they came at the Saints from the off. A ball steal from Robinson as Eccleston was bringing the ball away was brought to a halt just short but at the expense of a sinbin for Calvin Wellington. The attack came to nought and the Saints did exactly what you want when you’re a man down, they went and scored as a McDonnell overhead pass was taken by Eccleston who managed to touch down at the corner flag.Undaunted Fax came charging back and prop Reilly scored stretching out over the line at the posts.Levy Nzoungou had try disallowed for obstruction but the Saints showed their superior fitness first keeping Fax out on three consecutive sets then dominating the next fifteen minutes scoring three tries to put any thoughts of a comeback totally to bed.The dummy of the season thrown by Tom Whittle led to the try of the match as the big prop found himself free on half way. Everybody expected him to pass and we all took it as he continued to charge down field before coolly passing wide to Wellington. The centre took it on then chipped a pinpoint ball right footed over the cover which was expertly caught of the run by the supporting Connick who strolled under the posts.From the kick-off five drives put the Saints on the attack but Connick’s high kick was dropped cold by the Fax fullback and fell straight into the hands of Owen Smith who had a run in which even your correspondent could’ve scored from.A missed tackle down the middle let the visitors in for a consolation try.The final act of the game saw Davies dive in for his second from dummy half which then brought the spectacle of Dave Llewellyn being asked to convert from in front of the sticks. Apparently he was too tired to walk too close to the sticks from where he picked up the ball which meant that he put the ball embarrassingly wide.The final game of the season was as competitive as the all of the Reserves games have been and both coaches were as upbeat about the competition as each other with Fax having signed numerous players and the Saints being to introduce their younger players into playing against men.Match Summary:Saints:Tries: Kevin Brown (7 & 21), Regan Grace (33), Olly Davies (38 & 78), Dave Eccleston (47), Tom Connick (64), Owen Smith (67).Goals : Danny Richardson, (3/4), Brad Billsborough (2/3), Dave Llewellyn (0/1).Halifax:Tries: Martyn Reilly (51), Adam Ryder (72).Goals: Connor Robinson (1/2).Half Time: 22-0Full Time: 42-10Teams:Saints:1. Shannon McDonnell; 2. Kevin Brown, 3. Jake Spedding, 4. Calvin Wellington, 5. Regan Grace; 6. Tom Connick, 7. Danny Richardson; 8. Tom Whittle, 9. Aaron Smith, 10. Olly Davies, 11. Owen Smith, 12. Dave Llewellyn, 13. Jack Ashworth. Subs: 14. Josh Eaves, 15. Jordan Gibbons, 16. Dave Eccleston, 17. Callum Hazzard, 18. Levy Nzoungou, 19. Brad Billsborough, 20. Chris Follin, 23. Cameron Brown.Halifax:1. James Saltonstall; 5. Jamie Stringer, 3. Adam Ryder, 4. Gareth Potts, 2. Conor McGrath; 6. Joe Martin, 7. Connor Robinson; 8. Elliott Morris, 9. Billy Gaylor, 10. Martyn Reilly, 11. Jordan Syme, 12. Ed Barber, 21. Adam Robinson. Subs: 13. Josh Greenwood-MacDonald, 15. Morgan Punchard, 16. Cian Timmins, 17. Will Calcott, 18. Lewis Hosty, 19. Lewis Boye, 20. Aiden Hema, 22. Jack Mead, 24. Jack Matthews.last_img read more

The 20yearold has been recognised for his perfor

The 20yearold has been recognised for his perfor

first_imgThe 20-year-old has been recognised for his performances on dual-registration for Sheffield.He has played 15 games for the Eagles alongside five for the Saints.Brandon Moore of Halifax and Harry Newman of Featherstone Rovers are also named in the shortlist.Saints’ James Bentley won the accolade in 2017.last_img

CFPUA asks customers to voluntarily conserve water

CFPUA asks customers to voluntarily conserve water

first_img Wise water-use steps include:Operating irrigation systems in the early morning or evening, no more than two to three times a week to distribute a total of one inch of rain per week on lawns.Running only full laundry and dishwasher loads.Turning off water when not in use, such as when brushing teeth.Using a trigger nozzle that automatically shuts off when washing vehicles.Sporadic low pressure has been reported by some customers in the Middle Sound area over the last several days. CFPUA staff are exploring interim steps to mitigate this until a planned water main extension is installed sometime in late 2020 or early 2021.CFPUA continues to monitor conditions in our drinking water systems and meteorological trends to determine whether formal water-use restrictions may be required to maintain adequate drinking water service to the community.Related Article: Reporter who broke GenX contamination story hired as CFPUA spokesmanOn Sunday, Pender County issued a water shortage emergency in certain areas and on Monday, Brunswick County also asked residents to conserve water. (Photo: CFPUA) WILMINGTON, NC (WWAY) — Cape Fear Public Utility Authority is encouraging its customers to use water wisely as the persistent high temperatures and lack of rain increase demands on the community’s drinking water systems.According to a news release, CFPUA has not implemented water-use restrictions at this time, but customers should consider steps to reduce water use to ensure service for all customers and adequate supply for essential services, such as fire protection and medical uses.- Advertisement – last_img read more

Watch Unsafe parts at Mount Carmel have been evacuated – Fearne

Watch Unsafe parts at Mount Carmel have been evacuated – Fearne

first_img SharePrint WhatsApp Health Minister and Deputy Prime Minister Chris Fearne said that the unsafe parts at Mount Carmel Hospital have been evacuated. He insisted that the patients are now in a secure location. Minister Fearne said that the patients from the two wards in question have been reallocated to a rented facility outside of the hospital. The reconditioning works at in these two wards should not take longer than 5 weeks. He also added that this is the first step for a general Mount Carmel Hospital revamp. Shameful that government funds corruption and not mental health – PNMinister Fearne was talking to journalists during a visit at the Regional Health Centre in Paola, which is undergoing restructuring works. Accompanying him was Parliamentary Secretary for EU Funds and Social Dialogue Aaron Farrugia. center_img <a href=’http://revive.newsbook.com.mt/www/delivery/ck.php?n=ab2c8853&amp;cb={random}’ target=’_blank’><img src=’https://revive.newsbook.com.mt/www/delivery/avw.php?zoneid=97&amp;cb={random}&amp;n=ab2c8853&amp;ct0={clickurl_enc}’ border=’0′ alt=” /></a>last_img read more